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Comment Re:Ugh... no thanks. (Score 1) 216

You keep your peanut butter in the fridge? Peanut butter at room temperature doesn't turn until something like 5 years after the "best before" date.

It will acquire a rancid oil odor after a few months of hot summer days. I don't know if you call that "turning", but I don't like it, and rancid oil may have potentially carcinogenic compounds. The fridge is cheaper than keeping the A/C on all the time just to protect a jar of peanut butter.

Comment Re:do it right (Score 1) 122

Does that matter?
The pictures only have to be high enough res to reliably enable OCR, anything above that is irrelevant.

It might not matter if you are scanning novels to produce ebooks, but for technical works with equations you want to see the actual text layout in a pdf, and for small subscripts less than 300dpi (preferably 400) is a no-go.

Comment Re:Article blocked (Score 1) 194

> http://technewsreporter.blogsp... works for me.

The Referrer Control for Firefox it links to bears no relationship to the screenshot above it. Its icon is a green square, not a blue globe. Its only options are "skip", "remove", "source host", "source domain", "target host", "target domain", and "target url". Checking any of them has no affect on the Forbes ad-blocker detection. Its Rules Preferences box is a blank window with only Close and Help buttons with no way to enter information. The Help button leads to a page with somewhat cryptic descriptions and no instructions.

Does anyone know how would I set it up on Firefox to bypass Forbes? Thanks.

Comment Both GCC and Clang (Score 1) 255

I periodically run both just to get the warnings that each is able to provide. And I clean up all warnings, even if I know that they are harmless, so I won't miss a blunder buried in the noise. Turning on all warnings has saved me from having to chase down more bugs than I care to admit. gcc *.c -o xxx -O -Wall -Wextra -Wmissing-prototypes \ -Wmissing-declarations -Wshadow -Wpointer-arith -Wcast-align \ -Wredundant-decls -Wnested-externs -Winline \ -Wno-long-long -Wconversion -Wstrict-prototypes -ansi -pedantic clang *.c -o xxx -Wall -Wextra Any other warnings you'd recommend?

Comment Re:not good (Score 1) 55

It's funny because my quartz watch outlasts not only smartwatches but all 19th century winding watches. :)

I don't know when self-winding mechanical watches were invented, but a few years ago my quartz watch died, and I wore an old 1970s-era self-winding Timex as a temporary stopgap that turned into a couple of years, until my GF got me a new quartz because she thought the Timex was ugly. Sure it lost a minute or two every week, but I didn't find that a big deal to adjust with my computer's clock always on the screen, and it just kept working with no battery to worry about. Actually I kind of miss it.

I hardly ever take off my watch (even the old Timex was waterproof) and would hate to have to take it off every night to recharge. So I'm completely out of the market for a watch whose battery lasts less than a year or two.

Comment Re:Still have to pay RENT after you buy it (Score 3, Informative) 85

Whose lifetime?

Not sure what they're fine print says, but I still have an original Tivo series 2 from 2001 with a lifetime subscription, and they still honor it with schedule updates and occasional software updates even after I've moved several times.

It's hooked to an old analog over-the-air TV with a digital TV converter, and the Tivo controls the converter just fine via its remote control sensor. It's impressive the number of channels available free with digital over-the-air, compared to the old analog, with hundreds of future program selections at any time. Obscure old sci-fi movies playing at 3am and so on that I'd never be aware of otherwise.

Of course I have the commercial skip hack programmed in. Unlike the newer Tivos where the hack just fast-forwards for 30 seconds, the old Tivo instantly skips 30 seconds ahead, which I find much nicer.

Comment Re:In the past this has been working under the tab (Score 1) 273

If you ALSO want me to behave like an employee, controlling my hours, sitting through useless HR presentations, and acting like an agent of a corporation, then I'm an employee and I want the full benefit package

Funny, that's exactly what contractors do. I was a contractor for 4 years at a desk where I had to show up in exact hours, attend OIG presentations about sexual harassment and child pornography on business systems, and of course was not allowed to post on Facebook where I work.

In a fair world, none of this should have any relevance to whether one is an "employee" or "contractor". In the past, as an employee I have had huge freedom to work my own hours, and as a contractor, I have worked under a rigidly controlled corporate structure with fixed hours and so on. It all depends on the situation, such as whether regular employees need to have you available during their working hours.

A key difference as I see it is that if you are a contractor, you should be paid at least the loaded rate (i.e. with benefits) of an employee doing the same work. If you aren't, the company is screwing you. And yes, I'm sure many companies are screwing many "contractors" who aren't in a good position to bargain. But I think that should be a primary part of the test of whether a "contractor" is really an employee.

Comment Viewing tip (Score 3, Informative) 66

If you turn javascript off on discovery.com (there are about 3 dozen(!) embedded sites; the list even scrolls off the NoScript screen), not only does the page load about 20 times faster, as a bonus you get the entire slideshow on one page and don't have to mindlessly click through one picture at at time.

Comment Not a linear relation (Score 1) 243

Alkaline battery voltage doesn't fall linearly with lifetime, but undergoes a rapid drop near the end of life: http://www.powerstream.com/z/A... In this curve, the battery has only 10-20% of its life left at 1.1v, and I've never owned any device that did not work down to at least that voltage and usually less. Whatever device in the example that stops working at 1.35v is very poorly designed and not something you run across often.

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