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Comment: Re:Wow... (Score 1) 324

by orcateers (#33210590) Attached to: How Star Trek Artists Imagined the iPad... 23 Years Later
Its also more visually apparent to the viewer that the person has a lot of documents open if there are a bunch of padds sitting around the desk. One of the big reasons movies and tv have trouble with computer stuff is that everything about the story has to be made visually clear to the audience.

Comment: Re:No... (Score 5, Interesting) 182

by orcateers (#32200948) Attached to: Sprint's $199 HTC EVO 4G Gets Release Date of June 4
I used to have Clearwire in Seattle, (which I believe was the same network this phone will use), the speed was good for streaming video, and they didn't have any cap on monthly usage, but they throttled me for bittorrent, ostensibly because of the upload quantity, but ftp uploading to my web host never caused any alarm. (I noticed that the sprint service for evo will cap uploads at 1 mbps). On an unrelated note, the wimax service varied greatly based on what window I put the antenna in, or what corner of the house I was in etc, so you'd have to test it out on-site before getting an idea of what it can really do for you.

Comment: What about Un-Manned Spaceflight? (Score 3, Insightful) 452

by orcateers (#29359943) Attached to: Future of NASA's Manned Spaceflight Looks Bleak
Programs like the Hubble Telescope, Voyager, radio telescopes, mars rovers, etc, are all projects that teach us immensely more for the invested dollars than manned space flight. Maybe we should encourage more of this type of research? I think Americans have a special fetishism of the frontier that gives fleshy-contact primacy, but intellectual contact with astral elements is exciting too.

Comment: Ive Got it (Score 1) 863

by orcateers (#29175589) Attached to: "Smart" Parking Meters Considered Dumb
1. duct tape a plastic bag over the meter
2. take a picture
3. bring the picture to your ticket hearing, object to your ticket by explaining that the meter was "broken".
4. Stop complaining, ya cheapskate. You don't pay for parking ever anyways, who are you to complain about "wait time" (which, I must say, Iv'e never hat to wait at a smart meter, even though they are a tad inconvenient)

Comment: Re:Hello alternative media (Score 1) 881

by orcateers (#28968105) Attached to: Murdoch Says, "We'll Charge For All Our Sites"
One thing I've learned by reading a vast array of kooky personalities on the internet is to be immediately suspicious of "news" sites that make a really big deal about how "alternative" and "fringe" they are. Often, places like this are trying to push a narrative about how "I don't have time to cite any sources because my expose about the secret international police state is just too mind blowing and the man is trying to shut it down" and "You can join me in my heroic quest for truth and justice if you just buy ten copies of my free DVD"

Comment: I used to get paid for this (Score 1) 119

by orcateers (#28840689) Attached to: Microsoft Uses Human Computing Game To Tune Bing
This was my job about three years ago. I would sit at home while a client dished out web queries, and I identified which sites were good results (they were nearly always spam). I would need to judge each web page in about three seconds. This speed was figured so that I could keep up my required quota, while still taking many, many 6.5 minute breaks (this being the longest amount of time before the client automatically logged out). This job drove me crazy. After looking at thousands and thousands of spam-pages your brain was jelly, and you want a free I-pod for no reason at all. You are also now listening to Drum and Bass internet radio, because you know that if you listen to music you like it will distract you. The only rewarding moment was when I found the feminist/lesbian-focus Star Trek fan fiction.

Comment: Why so much attention on manned efforts? (Score 1) 389

by orcateers (#28720189) Attached to: What If the Apollo Program Had Continued?
experience shows that people gain a lot more knowledge per invested dollars from unmanned space-projects like voyager, hubble, mars rovers, etc. than with manned escapades like the iss and the apollo program, but we continue to focus on putting our physical flesh into space as the most culturally meaningfull product of NASA, why?

As Americans, do we have a "Lewis and Clark complex"? Do we prematurely put space exploration into our existing ideas about "the frontier"? how much would we learn from a permanent moon-city, and would we really care if it wasn't all that much? (as long as we got to stick our flag into some more "virgin territitory")

"But this one goes to eleven." -- Nigel Tufnel

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