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Comment Re:I just signed up the competition... (Score 1) 362

AT&T doesn't touch my bandwidth. They don't cap it, they don't filter it - they aren't keeping a database of my URL lookups.

While I doubt that's true even today, it's only a matter of time before they implement bandwidth caps. I don't think any major ISP is not at least trying them out. AT&T started trials last November.

Comment Re:Map 10 Downing Street (Score 1) 285

True, you get Google's top result and you can also use Firefox's keywords feature to create search shortcuts of your own. But Ubiquity is more powerful. You can highlight a page of Craigslist results and use the map command and it will actually extract addresses from the detail pages of each result and map all of them. It can do translation of a webpage while you're on it, do syntax highlighting on code snippets, etc.

That said I still don't think it needs to be integrated in the browser and I don't see the problem with keeping it as an extension.

On a related note, the article isn't quite explicit, but the lightweight theming is provided by another Mozilla Labs extension that's available today called Personas.
Social Networks

Submission + - REVEALED: Facebook intentionally blocked privacy (

Adam Green writes: "REVEALED: Facebook Intentionally Removed Privacy Protection for Users

Last week, started a Facebook group and petition protesting Facebook's new feature that makes private purchases on other websites public on Facebook. (Group and petition are linked to at

Big news today, reported at CNET: Leaked screenshots of Facebook's original Beacon feature for corporate advertisers — made public at earlier this month — reveal that Facebook originally planned to give its users the ability to permanently opt out of having their private purchases made public on Facebook. Facebook evidently removed that option just before launching the new privacy-invading feature. Facebook users who are aware that their private purchases on other websites are being made public on Facebook must now opt out site by site, week by week, month by month. There is no permanent opt-out option — let alone an opt-in policy.

"Facebook should explain why they chose at the last minute to put the wish lists of corporate advertisers ahead of the privacy interests of their users," said Adam Green, a spokesperson for Civic Action. "Facebook has the potential to revolutionize how we communicate with each other and organize around issues together in a 21st century democracy. But to succeed, they need the trust of their users. The fact that Facebook pro-actively chose to make it harder for their users to keep private information from being made public will rub a lot of Facebook users the wrong way. The ultimate act of good faith would be to switch to an opt-in policy."

Read CNET story here:

Read MoveOn statement here:

Facebook Group here:

Petition to Facebook here:"

"When it comes to humility, I'm the greatest." -- Bullwinkle Moose