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Comment: Re:Why not (Score 1) 1091

by olehenning (#39424973) Attached to: Why Linux Can't 'Sell' On the Desktop
That's not really the question posed though. He's asking whether or not a massive increase in market share would be possible without the marketing efforts of Microsoft and Apple. He even stated "It's not that I don't find Linux worthy ...." And it's a fair point. I don't see GNU/Linux "making it" in the desktop marketplace for a while. Most people aren't willing to go out of their way to try something different if they get what they want quickly and easily just by using their wallets.

Comment: Re:micro or regional (Score 1) 840

by olehenning (#36616400) Attached to: With regards to beer, I prefer it to be:
Sorry, but you can't be too familiar with Norwegian breweries if you think Nøgne Ø and Lervig are the only two who produce good beer. Others like Haandbryggeriet, Kinn and Ægir all make fantastic beer. There are several others who are smaller as well like Inderøy Gårdsbryggeri and Små Vesen Bryggeri. I would actually say that Lervig is fairly overrated...

Comment: Re:Almost 2 months (Score 1) 443

by olehenning (#31974992) Attached to: Ubisoft's DRM Cracked — For Real This Time
I see your point, but Ubisoft will have to stick with this longer if they want to win. For Assassin's Creed 2, this was probably a loss, as the draconian DRM gave them a ton of bad press. In the long run though, people will most likely get used to the crap they have to eat and buy the games anyway.
Games

The Struggle For Private Game Servers 125

Posted by Soulskill
from the let's-make-onyxia-fight-ragnaros dept.
A story at the BBC takes a look at the use of private game servers for games that tend not to allow them. While most gamers are happy to let companies like Blizzard and NCSoft administer the servers that host their MMORPGs, others want different rules, a cheaper way to play, or the technical challenge of setting up their own. A South African player called Hendrick put up his own WoW server because the game "wasn't available in the country at the time." A 21-year-old Swede created a server called Epilogue, which "had strict codes of conduct and rules, as well as a high degree of customized content (such as new currency, methods of earning experience, the ability to construct buildings and hire non-player characters, plus 'permanent' player death) unavailable in the retail version of the game." The game companies make an effort to quash these servers when they can, though it's frequently more trouble that it's worth. An NCSoft representative referenced the "growing menace" of IP theft, and a Blizzard spokesperson said,"We also have a responsibility to our players to ensure the integrity and reliability of their World of Warcraft gaming experience and that responsibility compels us to protect our rights."
Games

Copyright and the Games Industry 94

Posted by Soulskill
from the your-super-mario-toilet-paper-is-probably-illegal dept.
A recent post at the Press Start To Drink blog examined the relationship the games industry has with copyright laws. More so than in some other creative industries, the reactions of game companies to derivative works are widely varied and often unpredictable, ranging anywhere from active support to situations like the Chrono Trigger: Crimson Echoes debacle. Quoting: "... even within the gaming industry, there is a tension between IP holders and fan producers/poachers. Some companies, such as Epic and Square Enix, remain incredibly protective of their Intellectual Property, threatening those that use their creations, even for non-profit, cultural reasons, with legal suits. Other companies, like Valve, seem to, if not embrace, at least tolerate, and perhaps even tacitly encourage this kind of fan engagement with their work. Lessig suggests, 'The opportunity to create and transform becomes weakened in a world in which creation requires permission and creativity must check with a lawyer.' Indeed, the more developers and publishers that take up Valve's position, the more creativity and innovation will emerge out of video game fan communities, already known for their intense fandom and desire to add to, alter, and re-imagine their favorite gaming universes."

Comment: Re:What languages? (Score 1) 1359

by olehenning (#28502021) Attached to: Emigrating To a Freer Country?
A lot of germans that I've come across refuse to speak English. I actually sat down and spoke to a German guy about this a few years ago. He said that most germans know how to speak English just fine, but they choose not to. When I went to Germany I had to use my rusty, no-good German to communicate as people simply wouldn't reply when I spoke English.
Security

Botnet Expert Wants 'Special Ops' Security Teams 115

Posted by timothy
from the if-wishes-were-horses dept.
CWmike writes "Criminal cybergangs must be harried, hounded and hunted until they're driven out of business, a noted botnet researcher said as he prepared to pitch a new anti-malware strategy at the RSA Conference in SF. 'We need a new approach to fighting cybercrime,' said Joe Stewart, director of SecureWorks' counterthreat unit. 'What we're doing now is not making a significant dent.' He said teams of paid security researchers should set up like a police department's major crimes unit or a military special operations team, perhaps infiltrating the botnet group and employing a spectrum of disruptive tactics. Stewart cited last November's takedown of McColo as one success story. Another is the Conficker Working Group. 'Criminals are operating with the same risk-effort-reward model of legitimate businesses,' said Stewart. 'If we really want to dissuade them, we have to attack all three of those. Only then can we disrupt their business.'"

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