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Microsoft

Journal Journal: Microsoft Surface

The launch of Microsoft Surface marks the beginning of a new technology category and a user-interface revolution. Surface, Microsoft 's first surface computer, provides effortless interaction with digital content through natural hand gestures, touch and physical objects. Surface computing breaks down traditional barriers between people and technology. Something similar to this was presented a
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft unveils coffee table touchscreen

aapold writes: "Code-named "Surface", microsoft is set to unveil a coffee table touchscreen PC at a conference today in Carlsbad, CA. Prices run between $5,000 to $10,000, and are expected to be deployed in stores such as T-Mobile and lobbies of Starwood Hotels.

But what I really want to know is if it this coffee table will run java..."
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft Unveils Multitouch User Interface

longacre writes: Popular Mechanics takes the Microsoft Surface system for a hands-on video test drive. To be announced at today's D5 conference, the coffee-table-esqe device allows manipulation from multiple touch points, while infrared, WiFi and Bluetooth team up to allow wireless transfers between devices placed on top of it, such as cameras and cell phones. Expected to launch before the end of the year in the $5,000-$10,000 range, the devices might not make their way under many Christmas trees, but will find the insides of Starwood hotels, Harrah's casinos and T-Mobile shops.

Comment Re:Good job Harvard (Score 2, Interesting) 110 110

I was part of the team that placed 2nd in the southern california regional, and seeing how badly some of these teams did [harvard, UNC] is very disheartening, because our region only had enough schools competing to send 1 team. It is tough to know that the only team that closely beat us in the regional contest placed 12th in the world, and yet the US is still sending teams who can't solve more than 1 or 2 problems and crack the top 50.

Maybe the ACM should open up more spots based on how the regions perform at the World Finals and less on the number of schools that compete if they really want to send the best teams.

Often statistics are used as a drunken man uses lampposts -- for support rather than illumination.

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