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Comment Story Bible (Score 1) 95

The package for selling a series typically consists of a treatment/pitch document, a pilot script and a story bible. The story bible typically contains the layout of the characters and main story lines for the first season and often has synopses of a;; the first season shows.

A series has a master producer called a Show Runner. If that guy or gal is concerned with continuity across episodes and seasons then continuity happens. If they are not then the only continuity you can count upon is adherence to the story bible and in-episode continuity which is handled by the script supervisor/continuity supervisor.

A good show runner keeps the story bible updated as things change and grow.

Submission + - Your Toyota's Software has 10,000 Global Variables->

obscuro writes: In 2013, Toyota settled an unintended acceleration lawsuit out of court for $3 million after software forensics experts explained that their system was run on Spaghetti code. This article is the first I'd heard of it and I thought it might also be /.'s first shot at it... or, at least, a chance to stroll down memory lane.

http://www.safetyresearch.net/...

Link to Original Source

Comment Style - Toward Clarity and Grace (Score 1) 244

Get a copy of this book: Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace by Joseph M. Williams (Author), Joseph Bizup (Author). Read it and obey it.

It teaches the reader how to write and rewrite based on what cognitive science has discovered about reading comprehension and motivation.

Some of the important basics are - avoiding the passive voice (with WHY you should do so and a very compelling discussion about AGENCY); chaining ideas from one sentence to the next and one paragraph to the next so cause and effect tracks with attention; how to group information so the reader remembers it; how to reinforce an idea.... Every page is a revelation.

From my own experience, I find reasons connected to examples go VERY far. Using examples, even for very complex things, was something to which Richard Feynman credited much of his success. He believed that if you couldn't come up with an example that illustrated the problem then you didn't understand the problem.

Also, PLEASE lead with the one or two things you know someone needs. Handle the 80% who are there to set something up and leave. A good anti-pattern for this is the man page for ifconfig. As man pages go it's very good but it requires digging to construct the line in the shell one might need. People go to the man page for ifconfig to connect to a wired or wireless network and have the most challenges with wireless. The top of that page (and many other man pages) should read something like this: If you are connecting to a wired network, get THIS + EXAMPLE information by doing THIS + EXAMPLE and then use it to do THIS + EXAMPLE. If you are connecting to a wireless network, get THIS + EXAMPLE information by doing THIS + EXAMPLE and then use it to do THIS + EXAMPLE. After each THIS + EXAMPLE have a statement like, "you'll probably see something like THIS" with an explanation of how to use it. Then it should have a basic, advance and troubleshooting section followed at the end by a related concepts section that you can use to find other man pages that might be helpful.

Comment Re:One small problem (Score 1) 509

Sorry dude, you're wrong on almost all of these counts and clearly don't understand the American system of government and law.

  • Number 1 is totally wrong. We don't derive our rights from being represented in congresses and George Carlin is funny but they aren't privileges.
  • Number 2 is totally wrong. Groups don't have rights. We recognize some groups as lacking sufficient majority to access their natural rights via the common channels of commerce, society and government so we make laws to reinforce their access to their rights.
  • Number 3 is not just wrong it's the definition of a totalitarian state - so please stop voting.
  • Number 4 is a problem. The only quote I see in the posts you might be referencing is quoting the Constitution, not "liberty and justice for all" from the Pledge of Allegiance. The Constitution can be found in the first section of the first chapter of the first book of US law.
  • Number 5 is wrong. It's like saying that the primary function of a company is being a company. Organizations exist to execute mandates not to be organized. Our government's purpose is specifically to, "establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence (SP.), promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity..." See the BLESSINGS OF LIBERTY part? Take a closer look.
  • Number 6 is a paraphrase from fucking MAO, "Political power grows out of the barrel of a gun." Here in the United States we believe that liberty comes from our creator (whoever we think that might be) and that it is protected by OUR continued maintenance of the capacity and right to use force. So, you're kind of right but if you elaborated I'm sure you'd show how wrong you can be about it.
  • Number 7 is a bizarre statement. Justice in the United States is about protecting people's rights to life, liberty and property. That's why it's POSSIBLE TO BE GUILTY OR INNOCENT. When someone deprives someone of their RIGHT to life, they are guilty of murder. GET IT?

The individual is the source of ALL RIGHTS, ALL RESPONSIBILITIES and ALL POWERS. The Declaration of Independence works like the givens for a geometric proof. "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed." There is no society contemplated here. Society is a collection of individuals that, JUST LIKE GOVERNMENT, is never presumed to have more rights than the individual.

Individuals have certain responsibilities that go along with those rights. "But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security." We have a duty to correct or abolish our government if it fails to protect and serve our rights AS INDIVIDUALS.

The particular limits on government called out in the Bill of Rights is instructive here. They are the rights necessary to correct or abolish our government or to establish and run one.

  • 1st Amendment - Free speech (exactly how does SOCIETY speak?) and free assembly (which can be two people or a million) - This is the right that we use freely AS INDIVIDUALS and that we grant to the government for the formation of courts, administration, departments, congresses, etc.
  • 2nd Amendment - Right to keep and Bear Arms - This is a right we use AS INDIVIDUALS and a right we grant to local governments for policing and to our national government for FBI and military. Our individual right to bear arms is also what qualifies our courts as those belonging to a free people. WE THE PEOPLE are the convening authority of our courts. If only the police and military had the right to bear arms then THEY would be the convening authority of our courts.

The list goes on. But the idea is that there is NOTHING in US law that society of the government is permitted to do that is not directly derived from rights belonging to the individual. And ALL POWERS granted to the government are granted under strict conditions.

It's forgivable that you don't know this. Democrats hate this stuff. It tends to seem quaint and it gets in the way of their plans. Nevertheless, it's true. When there weren't so many idiots in the news, discussion about progressive politics often centered on whether they could be permitted under the Commerce Clause since that is the door through which Democrats have driven their giant bus load of change.

Comment An Actual Answer (Score 1) 167

I worked for several years during and after college at The George Baker Workshop which was in the Art Barn in the center of Occidental College. It has since been returned to the building's original purpose - food service. We built kinetic sculptures driven by motors, wind and or water. George Baker also taught all the sculpture classes out of the building.

Since it was the only space on campus outside of the physical plant department where people could go to work with metal, plastic and wood it became what is now referred to as a maker-space.

This was in the late 80s and early 90s when a CNC mill would set you back many, many thousands of dollars. We had two drill presses, a band saw, a belt and radial sander, a table saw, two standard anvils and one custom metal shaping anvil that George Baker designed and several oxy acetylene setups with cutting and welding heads which were available to everyone. Along with a healthy collection of hand tools.

We had a 3 inch lathe, a 10 inch lathe, a 5 ft break, a pneumatic punch, a plasma cutter and a TIG welder with a full station (metal table, etc.) and a set of very nice hand power tools. These were only for the sculpture fabrication team but we were happy to to help people with small projects and teach people how to do things.

Here are a bunch of things that might not come to mind but are SUPER helpful.

  • At least two big heavy tables - 5ft x 10ft
  • At least four small heavy tables 4ft x 4ft with a decent vise on each
  • Tons of different sized and shaped clamps
  • Tons of movable lights on stands for getting enough light on your work - great light from above can work against you when you're were under the work
  • Several LARGE portable fans - melty fumes, smoke, glues, paints and solvent need their air to be blasted out of the space fast
  • A set of standard fasteners with their related drills, taps and dies - this was a godsend - I remember we used 8-32, 10-24 and 1/4-20 and two other ones. They were allen head bolts in various head styles - people break drills and taps constantly - trying to support a big variety of fasteners is hugely expensive - you end up buying whole sets and having a ton of odd sized shit.
  • Plenty of 5 gallon buckets - you dip hot things in water, you used them to organize things, you used them for trash when some idiot super loads all the trash in the workshop with chunks of unusable pallet wood or rat shit covered fun fur
  • A large area DESIGNED to hold scrap material - wall space with deep strong pegs at 2ft intervals, 4ft x 4ft x 3ft bins
  • PROMINENTLY DISPLAYED CLEANING SUPPLIES WITH LOTS OF ENCOURAGEMENT TO SWEEP YOUR OWN MESS -broom, mop, floor cleaner, rags (with a schedule for cleaning them), paper towels, dust pans, small brooms.
  • PROMINENTLY DISPLAYED AND AMPLY SUPPLIED SAFETY GEAR - gloves (tons of them), respirators, googles, leather aprons, hard hats, FIRE EXTINGUISHERS

That's all the time I got. Hope this helps.

I would also put up a big sign that says, "Trigger Warning - Cisgendered fasteners and the language necessary to discuss them are used in this space." I first thought of this as a joke and then realized that, sadly, it's not a joke.

Comment Re:MOD PARENT RACIST (Score 1) 198

WTF? How is the OP being racist? Specifically?!

The OP is critical of our giant Federal spending and doesn't like the ACA. The idea that somehow that correlates to racism is INSANE. Do you have anything better than some lame name-calling?

What you're supporting, just to be clear, is sanctioning someone's speech because a racist might share that particular view. Let's apply that logic to you. Let's see who believes in sanctioning free speech and guilt by association.... Brutal Dictators most of whom also are racists, violent to homosexuals and brutal towards women.

So, by your logic you're posts should be modded down as hate speech because they are advocating an action that is might also be used by brutal, racist, gay and women hating dictators.

Comment Re:The Moral of the Story is... (Score 1) 360

I can agree with most of that. I think the first script and movie had pace and clarity on its side. And SiFi in the years leading up to 1977 was all about post apocalyptic earth or abstract freak outs. So, SW was a VERY welcome change from hand wringing and acid trips to an exciting, accessible story.

The two Lawrence Kasdan scripts are miracles. The first movie had complete closure. All the mythology about Lucas having a long term vision should be pretty much dead after seeing Episodes I-III. What a mess!! You can thank Lawrence Kasdan for SW being an exciting trilogy. The second and third movies were well written scripts. I promise you Ewoks and other blemishes are all Lucas.

And once you ask the question, "Who builds the Death Star twice?" you're on your way to the question -Who, given that they can build more than one Death Star, only builds one at a time?

Comment The Moral of the Story is... (Score 1) 360

If you're a bad actor or you are made to look like a bad actor by a bad script or director, your career will be hurt. The Star Wars franchise has had some good scripts and directors and some disasters.

Harrison Ford was a good actor - he got work. James Earl Jones got half the bad magic guy roles for the next 15 years. Billy Dee Williams did fine after being Lando Calrissian. Those were well written roles and the actors played them well. Luke, "But I want to go to Tashi station to get more power converters" Skywalker? You've got to be a STELLAR actor to make anything out of that role and Corvette Summer is all I have to say about Mark Hamill's acting chops. Admittedly Carrie Fisher is a bit of a mystery.

Episodes I-III were terribly written and directed as if the principal actors were on methadone. It didn't hurt Liam Neeson or Ewan Mcgregor because they were famously great actors with an established brand in England. Natalie Portman was a well loved indy actress. Only indy film people really knew she was a great actress. Natalie Portman should have walked off the set the first time George Lucas told her to act like a piece of wood. He wasted her talent.

Comment Proof that the Internet Makes You Fat (Score 1) 496

That guy's chart is proof that html makes you fat. See that little downward tick around 2011 when everyone started abandoning the web for mobile apps. Then BOOM - Bootstrap brings him back to html pages. And that steep recent drop. He thinks it's from his diet and exercise but it's really because all the time he spends looking at his Fit Bit he's not on the web.

Comment FreeBSD and OpenBSD (Score 1) 716

I hadn't touched the BSDs (with the exception of Mac) in nearly a decade but recently had reason to dig into FreeBSD and OpenBSD. I installed both, played around and dug into some work related to my goals. This will sound funny, but I almost wept. They were both so straight forward and HELPFUL!! The errors suggested paths for getting it right the next time. The documentation was up to date and made perfect sense. Everything was where and what the documentation said it would be and where I intuitively wanted to look for it. The config files had nice big comments and helpful examples you could uncomment and use. There was just no noise.

I ended up choosing FreeBSD for my project for convenience sake. Some packages I needed were being tested on FreeBSD. But OpenBSD is BEAUTIFUL. If security is your top concerns it's worth ANY hassle to run it.

I've administered Linux on servers and on desktops/laptops since 1998. I ran RedHat, Fedora and then Ubuntu on my laptop from 2000 till 2011 when I got a started using Mac a lot more.

I started out with Linux a little late. In 1996 I bought that Gray Box with the Red Hat on it when it started selling at Fry's. That box came with a book. I was a Windows admin at the time and the mix of dlls, config files and registry entries was just getting annoying. I was playing the the pre-release of NT 4.0 and worrying about all the shit they moved out of userland and into the kernel. I remember going through the Red Hat book that came with that box, reading man pages and falling in love. It made sense. I got excited about knowing where to look and having pretty much ONE set of things to know for all the configuration files and shell work. I felt like if I did my homework and took an action, it wouldn't betray me.

FreeBSD made me feel that way again but MORE. It's an operating system you can master with the necessary services to do anything.

As the opportunities arise I'll be switching to one of the BSDs. I'm already running some of my cloud services on FreeBSD 10.1. There are more services in the cloud for Linux but it's worth the extra bits of work to me. And I'm constantly pleasantly surprised that the work I prepare for has already been done somewhere or is easier than I thought it would be.

If you feel like Linux is getting too complex. There's and alternative *NIX out there worth a good hard look.

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