Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:It worked on you, didn't it? (Score 1) 347

by nicholasjay (#46140951) Attached to: Super Bowl Ads: Worth the Price Or Waste of Time?

Since talking about the commercials has become almost as popular as the game itself, here's a place to do just that.

Exactly what the advertisers want.

Meh. Doing anything isn't usually in your interests exclusively. Increasing the value of your home helps the home centers (through sales), local governments (taxes), and neighbors (property values).

If I can't do something I want to do just because it might tangentially benefit someone else I wouldn't be able to do anything.

Comment: Entitlement (Score 3, Insightful) 408

by nicholasjay (#46024913) Attached to: Short Notice: LogMeIn To Discontinue Free Access

It's so typical. Someone offers a service/product for free. People use it and like it. They keep using it. Then the service/product gets changed/removed/etc and everyone yells at the owner about how they feel shafted instead of *thanking* the owner for providing such a useful service for free for so long.

Everyone feels entitled to get whatever they want for free.

Comment: Re:hmm (Score 2) 562

by nicholasjay (#45595959) Attached to: Anonymous Member Sentenced For Joining DDoS Attack For One Minute

The length of time spent doing something illegal shouldn't absolve guilt that it was illegal in the first place. In my mind it's the same as the mob mentality that overtakes people during riots. Just because everyone else was looting more expensive goods doesn't excuse stealing something cheap.

And he wasn't just sending some traffic to a website. He was participating in a DDoS attack and full well knew what he was doing and what the group was trying to accomplish.

If you're going to break the law to try to accomplish some 'noble'* goal, you have to be prepared for the repercussions of your own actions.

* I'm not saying that his goal was or wasn't noble, but everyone considers their own goals to be noble.

Comment: Re:Lost wages? What about back pay? (Score 1) 767

by nicholasjay (#45158173) Attached to: Shutdown Cost the US Economy $24 Billion

I've got some friends who work for the Fed and they loved the shutdown because they a) didn't have to go to work, b) weren't using up vacation days and c) were guaranteed backpay for the days the gov't was shutdown.

Nothing like a paid vacation.

I know a few federal employees and they hated the shutdown because they a) still had deadlines they have to meet regardless of the shutdown, b) didn't know when they were going back (couldn't travel or plan their furlough days), c) were not guaranteed back pay until the the whole deal was signed when the shutdown was ended.

Also, because of the unknown length of the shutdown, many applied for unemployment insurance because they were not allowed to look for work in their own fields.

So the shutdown was exactly like a paid vacation were you don't actually know if you'll get paid for it, you don't know how long you'll be off, and you're stressing if you'll be back to work before your next mortgage payment is due.

Comment: Good work at NASA still happens (Score 1) 262

by nicholasjay (#44745615) Attached to: Chris Kraft Talks About The Decline of NASA

NASA does more than manned space flight. There's all kinds of satellites and other unmanned missions and projects that NASA is exceedingly good at. Missions like Hubble, COBE, TRMM, and even instruments like SWIFT/BAT or cheap Earth-centric projects that come out of Wallops. Lot of good, exciting work still goes on at NASA, but it doesn't get a lot of coverage in the media.

Hell, NASA is even launching a satellite going to the moon on Friday (LADEE), but no one even knows about it.

Comment: Re:Begining to end??? (Score 1) 247

by nicholasjay (#42045397) Attached to: Highway To Sell: AC/DC iTunes Snub Finally Over

Not only that, but what about the compilation albums? Weren't they just an attempt to sell more records with minimal work? How were they put together?

Have they actually done any compilation albums? I'm not aware of one, and TFA seems to agree.

I can think of two. Who Made Who and the Iron Man 2 soundtrack.

Comment: Re:Begining to end??? (Score 3, Informative) 247

by nicholasjay (#42045127) Attached to: Highway To Sell: AC/DC iTunes Snub Finally Over

...submitting that the group's albums were designed to be listened to from beginning to end

So, where was all the outrage when radio stations were playing one song at a time? You know, the one or two good songs that people actually wanted to listen to?

Not only that, but what about the compilation albums? Weren't they just an attempt to sell more records with minimal work? How were they put together?

Comment: Non-story (Score 1, Offtopic) 255

by nicholasjay (#40841287) Attached to: Speed of Sound Is Too Slow For the Olympics

What a non-story. It says in the article that they began using this technology in the 2010 Vancouver Games.

" Beginning at the Vancouver Olympics in 2010, OMEGA switched to the current "silent" pistol technology, erasing the thousandths of of a second that stood between runner nine and runner one."

Comment: Re:This game is random , you can't outsmart someon (Score 1) 292

by nicholasjay (#35428706) Attached to: Can You Beat a Computer At Rock-Paper-Scissors?

I used the random number generator from truerandom.org to make all of my choices for a quick game. 20-5-14, I won. I figured that if the computer was trying to analyze my previous moves to predict future performance, I'd give it something to chew on. I think the statistical analysis that the computer does assumes some sort of rational play by the human.

Even if it could detect the 'random play', the human could try to fool the computer by using RNG for a while, and then switch to his own choice, and back (randomly, of course).

"Religion is something left over from the infancy of our intelligence, it will fade away as we adopt reason and science as our guidelines." -- Bertrand Russell

Working...