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Comment: Re:How to cripple a city (Score 1) 473

by nephilimsd (#47708033) Attached to: Google's Driverless Cars Capable of Exceeding Speed Limit
The speed limit is generally interpreted as the "maximum safe speed, regardless of other conditions." As such, driving at exactly the speed limit cannot be considered unsafe for driving too slowly, though it could be considered unsafe for driving too quickly if other factors such as weather and traffic also impact the safe driving speed. http://www.nolo.com/legal-ency...

Comment: Re:Pete and Repeat (Score 1) 277

by nephilimsd (#47656663) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Why Are Online Job Applications So Badly Designed?
Posting every keyword you can think of is also most likely a bad idea. If the automated software detects too many keywords, the application is thrown out as likely spam. The ideal thing to do is to have one master resume that contains everything you think might ever be relevant, and then tailor a specific copy for each job you are posting for, using only the keywords they ask for in the job posting plus maybe one or two related skills. Then a human might actually see it. Also, you can still format a plain-text resume to be short, and provide a PDF of a pretty version with expanded explanations of duties or situations. And learn to bring additional copies of your resume to interviews, so you can give the interviewer something much nicer to look at.

Comment: Re:Disengenous (Score 1) 306

by nephilimsd (#47585715) Attached to: Amazon's eBook Math
I find value in the practices that companies employ, and not just in the prices that their goods are sold. For example, WalMart has a policy of subsidizing payroll dollars with tax dollars (http://www.forbes.com/sites/clareoconnor/2014/04/15/report-walmart-workers-cost-taxpayers-6-2-billion-in-public-assistance/). Therefore, I choose not to shop at WalMart. Furthermore, because I find this practice particularly egregious, I encourage other people not to shop there. If all of my choices were limited to three companies that engage in similar practices (or at best, one that doesn't), then the market isn't actually competitive. What you have is an oligopoly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oligopoly).

Comment: Re:Modern Day Anti-Evolutionists (Score 1) 497

by nephilimsd (#47417063) Attached to: Climate Change Skeptic Group Must Pay Damages To UVA, Michael Mann
I don't see deniers as being particularly squeaky, but rather as appealing to the outcome that most people want anyway: Change nothing about the current policy, the prices that we pay, or the convenience of life, and if possible, maybe think about doing something about this whole climate thing. But the climate is a very distant concern, after cost and convenience. If we can't find a cheap, convenient solution now, let's just wait until one shows up. In the mean time, full steam ahead!

Comment: Re:Even higher! (Score 2) 1040

by nephilimsd (#47158235) Attached to: Seattle Approves $15 Per Hour Minimum Wage
You're presenting a false dichotomy. On the one hand, either your preconceived notions of economics are true. On the other, all established principles of economics are false. This not an "A or not A" situation. It is entirely possible that labor cost does not have the same type of effect as you believe and for destruction for destruction's sake to still be a generally bad economic policy.

Comment: Re:Auto-save is NOT your friend (Score 1) 521

by nephilimsd (#47075639) Attached to: Goodbye, Ctrl-S
The number of times that I open a document with the purpose of testing a change or providing information to someone in a what-if scenario that I really don't want saved is probably more than the number of times that I open a document with the purpose of actually changing anything. I work in a finance department, and a lot of our calculations are still done in Excel templates. If I don't have the option to close without saving, I am probably not using whatever office suite you are presenting me.

Comment: Re:I don't know about you lot... (Score 1) 379

The thing about the Surface Pro is that apps from third parties are available. All of the apps that are used on a traditional Windows desktop are available. This includes entertainment options such as Steam or any Windows games, productivity applications such as Adobe suite and Office suite, video or sound engineering software, CAD software, or anything else created in the last 20-some odd years. Not all (closer to none) of the applications are optimized for touch, that's true, but that's what bluetooth mice and detachable keyboards are for. When those are inconvenient, you get to covert to a simple mode, where web browsing, netflix, emails, and whatever other tablet-specific applications you want are available to use. I own an original Surface Pro, and so far it has been the best all-purpose computing device I have owned. With the 8 GB RAM upgrade in the Surface Pro 3, I might actually consider upgrading. The biggest drawback is that Windows 8 is still frustrating to navigate. If they would add an option where Metro is the default screen when keyboard is not connected, and goes away completely when a keyboard is present, the device would be perfect.

Comment: Re:Soo... (Score 1) 465

by nephilimsd (#46901083) Attached to: Lessig Launches a Super PAC To End All Super PACs
The issues that you bring up are important, but the point of the MayDay PAC is that none of those issues can be effectively tackled while the only candidates that are available are those that are hand-picked by those with the most wealth. By ending Super PACs, more pertinent issues and ideas can be used as a political platform, and the issues that voters care about are more likely to be addressed than issues that the wealthy care about. Not implying that the wealthy aren't voters, mind you, just that not all voters are wealthy and we currently only get to vote on the basis of issues that the wealthy care about, and that does not really include the wear on drugs, punitive taxation, or the 4th amendment.

Comment: Re:Apple / Google / etc (Score 1) 288

by nephilimsd (#46420755) Attached to: How Ireland Got Apple's $9 Billion Australian Profit
Or, you know, you could tax profits. Like we already do for the rest of society. That's why individuals have "write-offs" that reduce their tax burden. Spending money on acts that want to be encouraged (restocking the dairy, donating to charity, etc) reduces the taxable income by the amount spent. In this argument, only $.05 would be taxable per gallon of milk sold. That means that given a 20% tax bracket (most of the U.S.), the price would need to be raised to $2.06 to break even. Not exactly a major hardship.

"Your attitude determines your attitude." -- Zig Ziglar, self-improvement doofus

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