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+ - Elementary OS 0.2 "Luna" Released 2

Submitted by kazade84
kazade84 (1078337) writes "Over the weekend the Elementary team released the stable version of Elementary OS, codenamed "Luna" which is based on Ubuntu 12.04. The new OS features an entirely custom desktop shell called Pantheon which has been developed from scratch using Vala and Gtk+ which allows for fast apps with a small memory footprint. Elementary OS has been years in the making, and the team have documented the process in their latest blog post."

Comment: Re:Awesome WM (Score 4, Informative) 357

by nem75 (#38461146) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Assembling a Linux Desktop Environment From Parts?

This.

I actually liked Unity very much, but in it's latest installment it became a sluggish PITA, so I started looking for alternatives. After using lxde-dekstop on the existing Ubuntu for a bit. Then I scratched that and started to build a complete custom install on the basis of the ubuntu minimal install CD.

So now I use lightdm, awesome wm with xcompmgr for basic drop shadows, Ambiance themes, Faenza icons and everything Ubuntu has to offer in the way of clear, smooth font display. Only gnome-settings-manager and gnome-keyring are left from Gnome Desktop.

This is the snappiest, fastest and most usable desktop environment I've worked with so far. I use it on my work notebook, with two 90 degree tilted external displays, and everything works without a hitch, even switching from rotated displays to the notebook screen and back (thanks to xrandr -o and disper).

It's geeky and a bit of a learning curve if you want to customize, but I'd definitely recommend giving it a try.

(And - on a DE unrelated note - if you work with code everyday tilting your display and seeing the code over the full _length_ of your monitor is like a breath of fresh air. ;))

Comment: Re:then? (Score 3, Insightful) 240

by nem75 (#34939494) Attached to: Wikipedia and the History of Gaming

The pottery bowl represents probably about 0.0001% of the items that were available during its given century of origin. Most of the other items from that specific time frame are not known to us anymore. As soon as the obscure game is the only game known from its time, it will be notable. Which probably needs some milleniae to pass and knowledge about our civilization to disappear almost completely, before the game is rediscovered. But not necessarily.

Its not primarily about age, its about how much is known about a decade/century/era in general. If 2000 years pass and about all computer games from the 80s are still known by then, the obscure game will still be ... well, obscure. And only marginally more notable than it is today.

Comment: Does hammering speed really matter for carpenters? (Score 1) 545

by nem75 (#34667460) Attached to: Does Typing Speed Really Matter For Programmers?

Well, it sure doesn't affect quality per se. But does it matter if a carpenter knows how to handle his tools or not? Yes it does. Is a carpenter with a high hammering speed more likely to be proficient with his tools than a slow one? Most definitely. So does hammering speed matter for carpenters? Overall it surely does, yes.

Programming and typing speed? Very much the same.

Comment: Re:Shotwell instead of f-spot, almost Yay (Score 1) 473

by nem75 (#33857888) Attached to: Ubuntu 10.10, Maverick Meerkat, Now Available

First, it's not a bug. It's a feature that doesn't exist that he would like to exist. There is a difference between a bug and a feature request.

Technically true, but completely irrelevant for how the application is perceived by the users. Though many developers do make that distinction (I know I do, more often than not) the question if they're doing themselves a favor by this is a valid one. As far as general user perception goes a feature not working correctly and a feature completely missing is equivalent.

Comment: Re:PC games definitely cheaper (Score 3, Informative) 225

by nem75 (#33821982) Attached to: Game Prices — a Historical Perspective

PC games have definitely become cheaper. I remember in the 90s paying £40 for some games (I paid £44.99 for Warcraft II as it was the cheapest I could find it at on release!), usually though they were around the £29.99 mark with the odd £34.99 game. At the start of this century they seemed to all pretty much go up to £34.99 as standard, but in recent years the trend has reversed, and £24.99 seems to be common for new releases, sometimes even lower - £22.99 or so.

For whatever reason the UK seems to be special in this case, computer game prices there are way lower than in the rest of Europe. So much so that some publishers ask Amazon.co.uk to not ship certain games to the continent (at least they did this in some cases last year). Anyway, when I buy new games I buy in the UK, it's way cheaper than in Germany e.g.

Comment: Re:Their equipment, their choice. (Score 1) 450

by nem75 (#33338184) Attached to: Germany To Grant Privacy At the Workplace

Now, back to the topic in question. So I own a company. I pay for the computer. I pay for the internet connection, electricity, desk, and even for the time you are there, supposed to be working. And I can't check on you ? Does that strike anyone else as utterly ridiculous ?

If your employees are so highly motivated that you need to watch over their shoulders to check they do their job, you've got a whole other set of problems that no surveillance in the world will solve for you.

Comment: Re:No one use GPS to navigate to local places. (Score 1) 519

by nem75 (#28634251) Attached to: Is Sat-Nav Destroying Local Knowledge?

What local knowledge? No one use GPS to navigate to local places. We use GPS to go places we have no knowledge of.

Or so one would think. But just because you use it that way doesn't mean that other people don't almost exclusively rely on their GPS units now, regardless of how well they (should) know their current location and destination. And sadly those people exist, as far as I could observe.

Comment: Re:Real men don't use tools? (Score 1) 519

by nem75 (#28634229) Attached to: Is Sat-Nav Destroying Local Knowledge?

GPS is used for new routes. It's new knowledge. Nobody uses Sat-Nav repeatedly for the same destination.

Uh-huh. Meanwhile, here on earth, people happily use their nav units to drive around their little hometowns, traveling from well-known destination to well-known destination, because they got so used to it that they don't have a fucking clue how to drive without the damn thing switched on anymore.

egrep -n '^[a-z].*\(' $ | sort -t':' +2.0

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