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Comment Interesting comment in TFA (Score 5, Informative) 303

You won't find the phrase "Emergency Manager" in this article, which indirectly positions the parasitic state government as our saviors in this crisis. And yes, I can say that without apologizing for city misconduct. When a newspaper of record like the Washington Post or The New York Times fails to report a detail as enormous as the persistent erosion and suspension of home rule in a time of public austerity, they essentially mislead their readers and distort the historical record.

Here are a few details that the Detroit Free Press and the Flint Journal managed to include but which the Washington Post and the New York Times did not:

- In 2011, newly elected Governor Rick Snyder passed Public Act 4 which allowed him to appoint an Emergency Manager over financially distressed cities with the power to liquidate assets, suspend and renegotiate contracts, and even disincorporate cities.

- In 2012, Michigan voters repealed Public Act 4 by public referendum, but within weeks the Republican majorities in the state legislature passed an almost identical bill, Public Act 436, that, as an appropriation, is referendum proof. Snyder signed this bill.

- From most of 2011 to 2015, Flint has been under a sequence of four Emergency Managers who, during their tenure suspended local officials, liquidated assets and, oh yes, DECIDED TO DRAW OUR DRINKING WATER SUPPLY FROM THE FLINT RIVER! Emergency Manager Ed Kurtz made the commitment, Emergency Manager Darnell Earley oversaw the transition, and Emergency Manager Jerry Ambrose nullified a City Council resolution to switch back to Detroit water in early 2015.

The Post should be ashamed for the way it has reported this story, and I do not say this lightly. These two so-called "bastions of liberal thought" have helped let an overwhelmingly gerrymandered and Republican-dominated state government off the hook for their role in poisoning 100,000 mostly poor, mostly black people in this city.

Comment Re:Year of the Linux desktop! (Score 1) 200

I was replying to the fact that the GP above me called Darwin a kernel. That's all. It's absolutely not. It's the operating system name. XNU has always been the kernel for NeXTSTEP/OpenSTEP, Darwin, OS X and iOS.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darwin_(operating_system)#Kernel
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XNU

Actually read it.

The GP is correct, and you're correct. So WTF are you arguing about? It's based on NeXTSTEP and BSD, as is plainly stated in the article. Besides, the entire web of core components that Mac OSX is built on: NeXSTEP, Mach, OpenBSD; all of them are tied somehow to BSD. It's in all of it.

This has nothing to do with what I was arguing with. I was correcting the person's terminology. It's like saying Debian GNU/kFreeBSD runs off the Debian GNU/kFreeBSD kernel.

Comment Modern X11 Desktop Environments don't need Linux (Score 2) 785

They don't. If you don't like the way Linux distros are evolving, then try out another OS that uses X11. Who knows, maybe a push towards FreeBSD will help speed up support for more hardware there. There's of course some certain apps (GParted for example) or limited features in a Desktop Environment that depend solely on Linux, but I find that to be generally rare, especially when looking at what FreeBSD Ports supports.

My oldie-but-goodie Slackware Linux is still staying away from systemd, so I'm glad about that.

Comment HAHAHA. (Score 1) 192

I mean no offense but I seriously think Slashdot was the last place to ask this question. It's no doubt a subject that needs some resolving, but based on posters' histories here, you should ask someone else.

My personal opinion? Move to Qt and don't use the default look. C++, cross-platform (if management is willing to extend it to that.) This of course costs money for hiring developers who are coherent in it. Typical management would say no. What is the software currently written in? Let me guess: Java.

Comment Holistic terminology (Score 2) 80

I'm guessing he used the term "holistic" in a sense that the plan covers multiple aspects of security. The classical term of "holistic" refers to not alternative treatments, but rather it covering the entirety of something or treating everything as interconnected. In medical terms, it usually refers to the mind and body as a whole.

Might I add that most "holistic" medicine is grade A horseshit.

Comment Re:Konsole (Score 1) 352

The hall of shame award goes to Apple's Terminal.app. Horrible handling of the bash key shortcuts.

the bash key shortcuts work just fine in OS X's Terminal.app. Can you give specifics, because I'm a hardcore shortcut user and I've never run into problems compared to X11 term apps regarding shortcuts in bash or any other shells for that matter.

Comment Re:Terminal.app (Score 3, Informative) 352

You actually have just as many options as any other term emu. I use zsh with Terminal.app just fine. OS X comes with:

/bin/zsh (z shell)
/bin/ksh (korn shell)
/bin/tcsh (t shell)
/bin/bash (default - bourne again shell)
/bin/sh (not bourne shell but bourne-again shell (bash) - it's not symlinked though which is interesting)

You can change it via the chsh command just like any other unix OS or if you feel like pointing and clicking your way there, you can edit Terminal.app's preferences.

Comment Re:OS X (Score 2) 405

Here's the list of supported Macs for the latest El Capitan Beta which goes back to some 2007 models: https://developer.apple.com/library/prerelease/mac/releasenotes/General/rn-osx-10.11/index.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40016209

As for osx86, I'm running the latest El Capitan Beta just fine on my Main PC (2013ish hardware) and my old Dell Latitude E6420 (2011) without issues - the selected hardware is fully supported. If you want to have OS X run fine on your PC then pay attention to using hardware within the range of what has support, either from Apple or third parties, and you'd be able to run the OS without difficulties.

Submission + - Microsoft Now OpenBSD Foundation Gold Contributor

An anonymous reader writes: The OpenBSD Foundation is happy to announce that Microsoft has made a significant financial donation to the Foundation. This donation is in recognition of the role of the Foundation in supporting the OpenSSH project. This donation makes Microsoft the first Gold level contributor in the OpenBSD Foundation's 2015 fundraising campaign.

Submission + - Microsoft thanked for its "significant financial donation" to OpenBSD Foundation (undeadly.org)

McGruber writes: Some unexpected news from the OpenBSD Journal: "The OpenBSD Foundation is happy to announce that Microsoft has made a significant financial donation to the Foundation. This donation is in recognition of the role of the Foundation in supporting the OpenSSH project. This donation makes Microsoft the first Gold level contributor in the OpenBSD Foundation's 2015 fundraising campaign."

Comment It's using Cider and Cider is known to be terrible (Score 1) 94

Looks like this has been said in previous comments - If you remember TransGaming's Cedega for Linux, a closed version of Wine that was considered reasonable competition to the open source version way back in the day, then you've now heard of TransGaming's Mac port of it. It's also considered a bit outdated as well, as current builds of Wine seem to work better on OS X for running games. I remember EA went through a phase of using it and the end results were pretty terrible. I'm amazed that Square Enix actually went this route. Cider is terrible. I bet you if they went for current Wine builds and put it in an app bundle (which people do for many DirectX Windows games to run them on OS X), it would work much better, but I'm sure that going that route versus using a commercial solution causes legal woes.

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