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Comment: Re:America (Score 1) 120 120

According to the article, it wasn't so much that the tabs were historical artifacts, it was that they could be used to date a location from 50 years ago. The example in the article was a campsite that was used during the 60s based on the type of pull tab on the beverage containers.

Comment: Re:Teacher? Teachers... IT? (Score 1) 629 629

Lazy IT, sure, but we are talking about teachers here, not professional office workers. They were probably locking themselves out their systems every time they had to change their passwords which caused disruption to instructional time so the Principal ordered all passwords to be locked down to the teachers last names.

At any rate, this might deserve a talking to and perhaps some sort of school punishment. Calling in the police and bringing felony charges just confirms my above views that the teachers and principal are likely not the cream of the crop.

Comment: Re:Reason: for corporations, by corporations (Score 1, Insightful) 489 489

Better analogy still. A private dirt road connects to a new Amazon.com distribution center. Amazon complains that it's shipping is slowed by all the new traffic it is created on the road and says the person maintaining the road should pave it. Private road owner refuses to do it unless Amazon foots some of the bill. Amazon does so and everyone is happy.

Remember, the Netflix and Comcast thing was about two private corporations working out their problems without resorting to government.

Comment: Re:What an Embarrassingly Vapid Article (Score 1) 477 477

Depending on the cost of cabs and availability, people might find it preferable take their personal driverless car to work then send it home or to a parking lot that may be a few miles away where it can wait to be summoned back for the ride home.

Comment: These things are like water! (Score 2) 149 149

Back in the mid 90s, I worked at a company that built protocol analyzers. During lunch break we would sometimes play Descent (2?). One day, a couple of us took a protocol analyzer and figured out which packet to push into the network to cause more mega missiles to appear (normally, there was only one or two in existence at a time).

When we played at lunch that day, we had a hilarious time when the biggest super weapon in the game became the primary weapon. Once the other players figured it out it became a grab/shoot/die fest.

One of the guys we pulled this on afterwords: "I picked up one mega missile and was like 'cool' then I got another, and another and another then I thought 'Holy Crap! These things are like water!"

Good times. Now, get back to work.

Comment: Should have gotten the other one banned (Score 1) 266 266

A better strategy would have been to get the old med banned for some reason which would force people on the new med and keep generics from cropping up at some point.

Seriously, if a drug company decides to stop making a drug, the patent should automatically expire.

Comment: Re:If you tax the rich, they'll leave (Score 2) 255 255

Well, if his assets are $20 Billion and his return on all his assets were only 5%, he would be generating $1billion in income. A write off of $70 million lowers his taxable income to $930 million. ( my guess is his return is higher than 5% but that is a SWAG)

Comment: Re:Ho-lee-crap (Score 2) 275 275

Nobody even mentioned that the modern carrier also has a large amount of electronics, sensors and other fancy doodads that no cargo ship will ever have to contend with (they may have a decent weather radar but they don't have any need to scan the sky for aircraft for example).

There are never any bugs you haven't found yet.

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