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Comment Re:Pointless analogy (Score 2) 216

The United States has or had a tax on completed light trucks imported from Japan. The solution for the Isuzu Trooper in the eighties and early nineties was to basically leave the rear seat out such that "final assembly" was completed at the dealership. I don't know how extensive the final assembly step was over standard new-car prep (where they're supposed to basically verify that the factory torqued key fasteners down etc) but I imagine that they shipped the rear seat assembly and other parts necessary for final assembly inside of the vehicle itself, since it has a fairly voluminous interior when that rear seat isn't bolted-down and configured for passenger use.

Almost right; From wikipedia: "From 1978–1987 the Subaru BRAT carried two rear-facing seats (with seatbelts and carpeting) in its rear bed to meet classification as a "passenger vehicle" and not a light truck." This was in direct respons to a so-called "Chicken tax" from the early '60s. Look up Chicken Tax on wikipedia - it's an interesting read how a tax intended to protect a certain market had ramifications for a completely different industry for many decades to come.

Comment Re:Birth Control (Score 1) 842

I would donate money to an organization that freely distributed birth control devices. Overpopulation strains the supply of natural resources like water, strains the food supply (farms being bought to put in housing), increases pollution, etc. And parents that don't have huge numbers of children can better care for their children. Lessen overpopulation -> help with many other problems.

That's putting the cart before the horse. If you listen to Hans Rosling he will tell you that when there are abundant resources, low child mortality follows, and then the birth rate naturally goes down. This has happened many, many times. So what I am basically saying is you will get the same effect by supplying clean water and health care to the third world, along with of course the life expectancy benefits that go along with those.

Comment Re:It's all a matter of perspective (Score 1) 842

That, to me, is being rich - it means being free to go anywhere and do anything. I don't need a lavish life of luxury; I just want to be free of the shackles that keep me from seeing the world.

Yep, agreed. I'd buy a 4x4 camper and do the pacific rim. Australia through South East Asia, China, Mongolia, Russia, Alaska, Canada, USA, Mexico, all the way down to Chile. Adventure!

Comment Re:Trading one set of problems for another (Score 1) 842

I have no mod points (and I've already posted in this thread anyway); but I find your post interesting and informative. Does the premise of your last paragraph depend on US tax law?

I didn't post merely to blow smoke up your ass though - I am genuinely interested in your sig line; can you explain it?

Comment Re:Trading one set of problems for another (Score 1) 842

I've often thought about this; you know, dreaming of winning the lottery and all. I often think, if I won the lottery, I could spend all my life finishing all those projects I have to do. But then, most of those projects are in place because I don't have a lot of money, so the impetus to do them is gone. Also, part (a lot?) of the fun in the projects is because it's a challenge to complete on a limited budget. If I had a lot of money, not only would the project be useless, but the fun part would be removed because suddenly there is no budget constraint. I wonder if my life would be empty if I had a lot of money? At least I could travel more, which would be great. But all those electronics and programming projects I have and enjoy doing - well, would i enjoy them as much if I weren't constrained by money?

I have a theory that it's impossible to prove anything, but I can't prove it.