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Comment: Re:umm duh? (Score 3, Interesting) 84

by TheRaven64 (#47521437) Attached to: Dropbox Head Responds To Snowden Claims About Privacy
There are techniques that allow searching within encrypted files, but they rely on the client creating the index. You can then search the index for an encrypted search term and, if you know the keys, interpret the answer. Getting this right is quite tricky (there are several research papers about it), so he's right, but it's not impossible.

The main reason that I suspect DropBox discourages encryption is that they rely a lot on deduplication to reduce their costs. If everyone encrypted their files, then even two identical files would have different representations server-side if owned by different users, so their costs would go up a lot.

Comment: Re: Code the way you want... (Score 1) 276

by TheRaven64 (#47521383) Attached to: 'Just Let Me Code!'
Yes, almost certainly. The market for compiler engineers is very much a sellers' market at the moment. Universities neglected it for so long that most people graduate from undergraduate degrees with basically no knowledge of how a compiler works (if they're lucky, the know how compilers worked in the '80s), so there are 10 jobs for every person.

Comment: Re:"Just let me build a bridge!" (Score 1) 276

by TheRaven64 (#47521177) Attached to: 'Just Let Me Code!'
In The Humane Interface, written in 2000, Jef Raskin made the same complaint. The time between turning a computer on and having written a program to add two numbers together on, say, a C64 or a BBC Model B, was about 30 seconds. On a modern computer of the time, you wouldn't even have finished booting - starting the IDE would take even longer. The problem is, this misses the point. There are lots of scripting languages with REPL environments, including a POSIX shell and PowerShell on Windows, that can do this as a single command once the computer is running (on OS X, you can add numbers in Spotlight, so it's even quicker - just hit command-space and type the sum). If you want to write a more complex application, it's vastly easier today. Extend that simple calculator to show an editable history and show equations, and you'll find it a bit easier today. Now extend it to be able to print - if you've ever written applications to print in the era before operating systems provided a printer abstraction then you'll know how painful that was.

Comment: Re:Analogies are poor... (Score 1) 276

by TheRaven64 (#47521159) Attached to: 'Just Let Me Code!'
I don't understand why you think 'yum install gcc' is somehow different from 'download and run the installer for the VS command-line tools'. Especially on a modern Linux distro, where libraries come with -devel variants to save you the 10KB taken up by the headers in the normal install, so you end up having to install a load of headers as well to get the system useable.

Comment: Re: Code the way you want... (Score 1) 276

by TheRaven64 (#47521141) Attached to: 'Just Let Me Code!'
I was a consultant for a few years and didn't find that it did. Most of my customers found me, as a result of my open source work (usually to work on the same projects, sometimes to work on projects in similar fields). Contract negotiation didn't take very long (they list some requirements, you mutually agree on a date, you pick a number, if they haggle then you politely decline).

Comment: Re:Best Wishes ! (Score 3, Insightful) 200

by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (#47519471) Attached to: Microsoft's CEO Says He Wants to Unify Windows
History isn't encouraging, though. They've been pursuing the dream of one windows to rule them all since the days when that involved smearing a crude layer of flayed win95 across winCE and pretending it was a good fit for PDAs.

Now that hardware has advanced they have a much better shot at architectural unification (if memory serves, NT has basically edged out everything else except for whatever CE support they provide for legacy customers); but UI? That won't go well.

Comment: Re:let me correct that for you. (Score 1) 595

by Zordak (#47519281) Attached to: Experiment Shows People Exposed To East German Socialism Cheat More

You consider a world where nobody has to work as a utopia. My observation is just the opposite. If you take effort away from people, they tend to become entitled, lazy, selfish, and (ironically, with more leisure time) miserable.

Where are you getting this from? I detect a very basic failure to either apply critical thinking or reading comprehension.

From your constant insistence, over multiple comments, that under your proposed system nobody would "have" to work. I consider it a privilege to be able to work to provide for myself and my family, not a burden to be cast off at the first opportunity. My ideal world is one where everybody has the ability and opportunity to work for a living wage, not one where everybody gets free stuff.

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Journal: Mars, Ho! Chapter Thirty Four

Journal by mcgrew

Engine
An alarm woke me up at quarter to seven and for once I didn't mind a bit, and in fact I was glad it woke me up. I was in the middle of a really weird dream. A herd of cows was stampeding towards me, only they were running on their hind legs and somehow carrying big butcher knives in their front hooves, all singing a Chartov song while coming at me. Too many westerns, I guess.
It was engine seventeen, somethin

Comment: Re:let me correct that for you. (Score 1) 595

by Zordak (#47517239) Attached to: Experiment Shows People Exposed To East German Socialism Cheat More

As a matter of strict values, I share your vision of a world where nobody goes hungry or cold. But I strongly disagree with your path to getting there. You consider a world where nobody has to work as a utopia. My observation is just the opposite. If you take effort away from people, they tend to become entitled, lazy, selfish, and (ironically, with more leisure time) miserable. They may have enough to eat, but they lose so much of their humanity that they become less excellent as people. There is intrinsic value to hard work. In my experience, people who work hard (up to a certain limit) are happier. A society of bored people is one where crime is rampant and people are full of envy and strife (because nothing begets envy like a sense of entitlement). And that's not even to mention practical issues, like the inflation that dogs basic income economies.

My "utopia" is one where everybody works hard when they're working. When they're not working, ideally, they're building strong nuclear and extended families, raising children with a strong work ethic, and teaching them that when they are able, they should help those whose efforts have been less fruitful than their own. That help involves, for example, helping people through tough times, or giving them a lift while they do something to improve themselves like get an education or start a business. The end goal is always for everybody to get to a point where they can support themselves by their own efforts, so that nobody is dependent on government largess (as opposed to everybody). In fact, government hardly enters into it, except for providing some basic infrastructure and emergency services.

Perhaps that society is not possible in our present human condition, but it is an ideal I would sooner seek after than one where an over-powerful central government deals with poverty by subsidizing laziness.

Comment: Re:How thrilling... (Score 1) 50

by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (#47517015) Attached to: Amazon Fire Phone Reviews: Solid But Overly Ambitious
The CPU and GPU are fine, reports on battery life seem to vary, with excellent results if you turn the 'dynamic perspectives' thing off and don't firefly much, tepid ones if you actually try to use those features; but the screen is genuinely disappointing for a phone in that price range, although the internal storage is better than usual.

There's nothing offensively wrong with it; but the price tag befits a device that is genuinely compelling in some way, which it isn't.

Comment: Re:How thrilling... (Score 1) 50

by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (#47516921) Attached to: Amazon Fire Phone Reviews: Solid But Overly Ambitious
Unfortunately, while stock android is undeniably Google's little fiefdom, 'FireOS' is a pretty much point-for-point a replacement of hegemonic Google with hegemonic Amazon (somewhat more, arguably, given the 'silk' browser's extensive default reliance on server-side processing).

It is pretty stark how lousy de-googled Android is; but Amazon isn't really here to change the dynamic of effectively closed control of the platform, just who controls it. Getting models with a 'clean' AOSP firmware(typically excluding drivers; because it seems to be blobs all the way down on the mobile side) isn't hard; but using them is fairly grim.

Comment: Re:Security? In a crapp? (Score 1) 39

by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (#47516325) Attached to: CNN iPhone App Sends iReporters' Passwords In the Clear

Did anyone *really* expect a crapp to have any sort of security whatsoever?

It's a trifle surprising given that the usual 'eh, let's just wrap our shit mobile website in a UIWebView and call it a day' school of 'app' development would likely have inherited SSL through sheer laziness, while whatever attempt at app development CNN attempted is apparently so dysfunctional as to be markedly worse than the state of website logins in general, and apparently so incoherent that the phone and tablet versions don't share login behavior...

That seems like the sort of thing that takes effort to screw up.

Comment: Re:No. (Score 1) 502

The one complicating factor, though, is that discrete sound cards are being squeeze from both sides: With even integrated GPUs offering HDMI and displayport audio, and even all but the most spartan (usually super-cheap and/or strictly business oriented) onboard audio supporting S/PDIF, the option of an external DAC or receiver becomes much more attractive, especially if you already have one that you like or want to be able to use other audio sources with a relatively expensive piece of high quality audio gear.

The performance of the analog components of onboard audio is, indeed, going to be more 'endurable' than 'good'; but digital logic is crazy cheap and (mostly) either works or doesn't, and basic boring onboard audio often has less ghastly driver mess than the cards trying to 'value add'(Creative, specifically, being a ghastly offender).

It's not as though they are a ghastly scam or anything, if you want to be able to plug a nice pair of headphones straight into your PC rather than an outboard module that's totally understandable; but they do occupy a slightly precarious middle ground between mostly-competent onboard audio and the full array of audio gear that accepts digital input.

The confusion of a staff member is measured by the length of his memos. -- New York Times, Jan. 20, 1981

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