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Comment Re:"At that price it's almost a burner" (Score 4, Informative) 166

"In the 1%" means you make $32,400 a year.


I personally sit in the top 0.38%.

Now you're just being pedantic. "The 1%" was a phrase popularized by the Occupy Wall Street movement, and refers almost exclusively to wealth inequity in America. The median income for the cohort to which the phrase "The 1%" refers is $400,000. Global wealth has no seriously meaningful value when considered on the scale of the individual. By your metric, the average homeless person in the US will be in the top 15 - 20%.

Comment Re:It's not just IT (Score 1) 152

He is neither trained nor paid to be a management consultant. Managers are paid humongous salaries not least because they are supposed to put in the work required for making qualified decisions. If they don't have the brains to pick that up on the job by talking to people in their language, they need to acquire that knowledge in courses catering to them. They don't get 10 times the salary of others for rolling dice.

If you're reporting to someone who gets 10 times the salary you do, either you or your company is fundamentally broken. And if you are incapable of explaining the reasoning behind the decisions you make in your position so that the person you report to can understand it, either you or your manager is seriously challenged in the communications arena. If you're capable, but just unwilling because you can't see past that massive chip on your shoulder, then you need to be replaced by someone who will. Either way, it sounds like your company has some serious problems.

Comment Re: It's not just IT (Score 4, Insightful) 152

A good manager doesn't have to be a technical person, they have to listen to their subordinates. When you tell your manager that something can't be reasonably fine or shouldn't be done their job requires them to listen to the technical experts on the project.

I've been on both sides of the managerial fence, and in my experience, you can't have one without the other. A good manager can't listen to their subordinates if they can't understand what they're hearing. It's like explaining color to a blind man. One of the primary responsibilities of a manager is communication. He or she has to be technically savvy enough to not only understand the decisions his direct reports are making, but be able to translate those decisions into the appropriate level of technical detail to the people he or she reports to. And that coin has two sides: a manager must also have enough business savvy to understand the decisions of his superiors and be able to translate them to his direct reports.

A manager who makes decisions on the say-so of his subordinates without being technically conversant enough to actually understand and explain why it's a good decision, isn't a manager at all: she's a proxy. The same goes for a manager who just tells his reports what to do without understanding why his own managers want him to do it.

Comment Re:Ouch? (Score -1, Flamebait) 301

By "this," do you mean the cheating, or the getting caught? The getting caught wouldn't have happened without the cheating...

By "this," do you mean the running from the police, or the getting shot? The getting shot wouldn't have happened without the running...
By "this," do you mean wearing the short skirt, or the rape? The getting raped wouldn't have happened without the short skirt...

Nope. Still mindless victim-blaming, but at least we know who you keep company with.

Comment Re:Editors : WTF (Score 1, Offtopic) 307

It's like saying "We have no chips in the vending machine".
You cannot "have none" - but you can "not have any".
"We do not have any chips in the vending machine" would be correct.

You have no idea what you're talking about. You don't have any idea what you're talking about either. Both of my assertions are grammatically and logically correct, with the former using the "no-negation" form of assertion.

Comment Re:Wait... (Score 1) 42

I have yet to meet ANYONE that has found linked in to be useful in any way. 99% of the "employers" are headhunters that are doing shotgun requests.

Hello, I'm Mark. Glad to meet you. I've gotten two of my last three jobs via LinkedIn and have helped at least two other people get jobs via contacts I made there. I found funding for a non-profit I'm with there. It's also my primary communication method for business associates with which I don't wish to socialize.

Like pretty much everything else on the Internet, LinkedIn is a tool. Just because YOU don't know how to use it doesn't mean it's not useful.

Comment Re: Internet dating is for cows. (Score 4, Insightful) 176

Internet dating is for people who don't have the social skills to meet people and engage in more than a nod or good morning in passing. The same people who don't know their next door neighbors and then complain they have nobody to talk to. Getting out and actually doing something, which would help address the problem, is too outside their comfort zone due to lack of practice. I predict a rise in similar scams targeted at the aging male programmer population who think they'll never fall for it.

Your view is painfully naive, shallow, and uninformed. For many people, "getting out and actually doing something" is a pretty crappy way of meeting people to date. If your ideal date is... well... someone just like you, it's fantastic. Otherwise, not so much.

I'm very social as well as involved in my community, but the aspects of community involvement I like as well as most of my hobbies tend to be things other guys like, not other women. Because of my job, I live in primarily family oriented areas where most people are married. I go out a couple times a week and it's always with married couples or just the guys. Single women in my age range are needles in the proverbial haystack.

Internet dating has been a godsend in meeting people in neighboring areas with different interests and different social circles. Internet dating is a tool. It's a shame you feel the need to denigrate others just because you don't know how to use it.

Comment Re:Say Good By to the Rainforests .... (Score 2, Insightful) 851

This is one of my favorite put-up or shut-up discussion points. Since 2004, Certified Sustainable Palm Oil has been available to the market. Over a decade later, a very small percentage of palm oil sold is produced via sustainable, non-destructive methods. Why? Because it costs more. Rather than support the RSPO by buying sustainable palm oil, slacktivists just boycott palm oil altogether rather than rewarding the industry for doing the right thing. The hypocrisy is mind boggling. Why would anyone change their behavior if those who want them to change refuse to support it?

Comment Re:But why? (Score 1) 634

No, of course not. Who is suggesting we force it?

They made their course more attractive to women, nothing else.

No, they didn't. They cherry-picked engineering applications which would appeal to women. The other drudgery that's necessary for society's functioning still needs to get done, and it will. Just not by people who think having feel-goods about what they do is more important than the work itself. I'm pretty sure if you changed nursing studies to "nursing while piloting supersonic jets", you'd get a lot more guys being RNs too.

Comment Re:Ignoring the stupidity of the FAA for a minute. (Score 2) 239

Can we just call it what it is? It's a "toy helicopter", not a "drone". That helps get the conversation on the right track.

No it doesn't. That just sidetracks the conversation completely and leads into another unrelated thread in which someone points out that "drone" is a colloquial superset of UAVs that includes "toy helicopter," the aircraft in this article, and whatever more limited definition you have in your head. It's pointless, non-contributory pedantry.

Comment Re: Run fast, for 2 fucking hours and over 26 mile (Score 1) 254

"Bill Hicks: Remember Jim Fix, that health-nut who died while jogging? Used to write BOOKS about joggingwhat do you jot down about jogging? “Left foot, right foot, hemorrhage."

Remember Bill Hicks, that comedian who made fun of Jim Fix, the health-nut with a heart condition who died at the age of 52? Used to smoke, drink to excess, and make fun of people who took care of themselves? Died of cancer at the age of 32.

Comment Re:I LOVE READING PROPAGANDA (Score 1) 981

First in regards to:

Well as a closed system maybe but, if your "society" is being propped up via funding and arms, and you have no need to actually produce anything yourself or even produce engineers at all, then it isn't as much of a problem.

The US spends over half a trillion dollars on the DOD a year. For decades, we have moved away from producing goods to a service providing nation. Granted, this is starting to improve a bit but it's nothing to celebrate, yet.

It's a little disingenuous to refuse the distinction between external funding and funding created from your own economy, don't you think? And the US economy isn't propped up by arms in the sense the OP used it because the use of those arms is not the engine of our economics. Propped up in the sense that we manufacture and sell them to others as well as ourselves, yes, but that's hardly a closed system, is it?

Federal grants are offered for... research into the recreation potential of interplanetary space travel for the culturally disadvantaged.