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Comment: Samsung Galaxy S5 works fine (Score 1) 484 484

I've been using a Samsung Galaxy S5 for about a year now and it never gave me any trouble. Battery lasts me through the whole day without any problems (of course you have to turn off non-essentials: GPS, Bluetooth, NFC, etc. when you're not using them) and it charges relatively fast. Never experienced programs crashing. Very happy with it.

Only thing I wish is that the camera program would open faster.

Comment: Re:No plans ... (Score 1) 188 188

I, too, make decisions of which I have no plans to follow through upon. I can almost understand their thought process. And I have a feeling some of you do too.

But some of you guys sound like my wife who complains about my poor life decisions.

Well, little did she know that marrying her was one of the... worst... atrocities I averted because if i were to remain single i wouldn't have a lovely person to remind me of how stupid my decisions could be.

My point is sometimes you just do dumb shit without plans. And it hertz to admit it.

Comment: Re:This thread will be a sewer of misogyny (Score 2) 779 779

This question hits the nail in the head. The assumption that men and women are or have to be equal in every respect is a notion that requires reexamination. Maybe women in general just find this specific area not to be of their interest, hence there are less women participating. Are there any fields where men are underrepresented where we have to change the law to include them? Ballet or women's studies, perhaps?

Also, does it always have to be about gender equality? I'm so tired how people try to profit by making things issues when they are not. Gender baiting, race baiting, whatever-baiting seems to be this nation's favorite pastime.

Comment: Re:One man's piss is another man's ... (Score 1) 245 245

Bill Gates studied the engineering behind it? I am so reassured...

The recommendation of the former CEO of a software corporation (no matter how successful) doesn't really give me that high a level of confidence in the product.

You think Bill Gates is the scientific mastermind behind this invention? Like you said, he's the CEO, the investor, the guy who got inspired to put his money on that project. He's not the brains behind its science. Do you think that the people around Bill Gates would let him drink that water if it wasn't safe or let him make a premature statement about the quality of the water? Most likely scenario is that this project was funded for quite some time and finally they called up Bill Gates to tell him they have a viable product. He goes and tests the product and gets some publicity out of it by drinking it himself.

He has people doing all the work for him. You don't have to trust Bill Gates to know that that water is safe to drink.

Comment: Re:Despicable Greenpeace (Score 5, Insightful) 465 465

If they really had no self-interest, as you seem to suggest, then the sign they left in the Nazca site would have just read "Time for change-The future is renewable" without mentioning "Greenpeace" in huge letters. You can't be so naive as to think that Greenpeace simply advocates issues of climate change, anti-oil, deforestation, etc. Their brand thrives on those issues and it's what defines them. Just look at their track record of getting people's attention with publicity stunts... How is that not self-promotion? In marketing terms they are brilliant.

The sad thing about this recent stunt is that Greenpeace is getting a lot of publicity out of it. Their so-called apology to the Peruvian people was a joke. Here's a direct quote from their official apology: "We fully understand that this looks bad... we came across as careless and crass." Looks bad? We "came across as"? They are apologizing that they stained their own image. They are sorry that the world now sees them negatively. In other words, they are expressing that they are sorry for themselves.... How far up one's own ass must one's head be for them to write something like that in an apology to the people of a nation? It should have read "We have no words to express the shame we feel for having acted the way we did." But that would be too humble.

If they are really sorry to Peru they would take part of their operating budget for the next few years to pay for all reparations and maintenance costs of the Nazca site.

Comment: protest against the protesters (Score 1) 1128 1128

Yeah, I get it. Some people are upset with the decision.
But how does that justify looting and destroying other people's property?
How does one make the mental link between the decision of the jury and destroying other people's cars, stores, and public spaces?
Something in that culture has to really change.

"Intelligence without character is a dangerous thing." -- G. Steinem

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