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+ - CSS Zen Garden Turns 10->

Submitted by mlingojones
mlingojones (919531) writes "The CSS Zen Garden—an attempt to showcase the power of CSS, from ye olden days when most sites used tables for layout, when CSS2 was bleeding edge, when IE5 was the most popular web browser—turns 10 today. In celebration, the maintainer Dave Shea is reopening the project for submissions, with a focus on CSS3 and responsive design."
Link to Original Source

Comment: For Mobile (Score 5, Insightful) 290

by mlingojones (#41311135) Attached to: Zuckerberg: Betting On HTML5 Was Facebook's Biggest Mistake
Ooooh. What the article MEANS is "betting on HTML5 as a MOBILE strategy instead of writing native SMARTPHONE applications was a mistake." That's much less broad. Also, as HTML5 is still in its infancy and not yet a finished standard, I think it's kind of early to make this statement.

Comment: Re:If you don't like Net Neutrality, (Score 1) 345

by mlingojones (#38012418) Attached to: Senate Set To Vote On the Repeal of Net Neutrality
What's the practical distinction to US citizens, though? We access the whole Internet through US-based ISPs, and the US government can impose regulations on ISPs, so as far as I'm concerned the government has the ability to control the Internet.

Of course, I would much rather have them in control than the ISPs themselves...

Comment: Re:The Whole Web (Score 1) 485

by mlingojones (#38004918) Attached to: Adobe Ends Development of Flash On Mobile Browsers

This annoys me greatly. It's supposed to be my device, HTC. (I would remove Flash completely if I could. I don't ever seem to visit websites that need Flash on my phone.)

Not to rub salt in your wound, but this seems kind of ironic given that the logic behind a lot of the attacks on iOS is that users should be able to choose whether they want to use it or not. It seems to me that not having the option not to use Flash is just as bad as not having the option to use it.

Comment: Really? (Score 3, Insightful) 301

by mlingojones (#37885948) Attached to: Dennis Ritchie Day

Am I missing something here that says we have to compare all these people on the merits of their accomplishments?

Steve Jobs did great things. Dennis Ritchie did great things as well. We can argue all day about who was "better" or "more influential", but what's the point? Why not just celebrate their lives to honor them, instead of to passive-aggressively piss off people who look up to someone else?

If you celebrate Dennis Ritchie, do it for his monumental contributions to computing. If you do it just because you think Steve Jobs got too much attention, you're doing a disservice to both of their memories.

Comment: Re:And how was society harmed? (Score 2) 334

by mlingojones (#37690200) Attached to: iPhone 4 Prototype Finder Gets Probation

What crime was committed? He found some prototype in a bar and sold it to some news website. What crime was committed, exactly? The guy didn't sign an NDA or anything.

Theft? Selling stolen property? If you lost your phone and the person who found it decided to sell it instead of return it to you, would it be a crime then? Or does it only become okay when it happens to a company you dislike?

Comment: Re:Good. (Score 1) 145

by mlingojones (#37052120) Attached to: Gizmodo Off the Hook In iPhone 4 Investigation

They didn't steal it.

They openly acknowledged how they got it.

In California, not turning in to the authorities a found object with a value greater than $100 is considered stealing.

They stated, simply, that if it did belong to Apple, which was not a 100% certainty but was likely, that all Apple had to do was to ask for it back through proper channels.

Because it only confirms that it belongs to Apple if Apple makes a public announcement, not asks for it back privately, right?

Instead, we saw what happened. I would rather a judge have found for them and dismissed with prejudice, but at least it appears to be working out.

I realize there's a presumption of innocence and they haven't been found guilty of anything, but come on, man. They publicly acknowledged purchasing property they knew was stolen, destroyed it, and when the owners asked for it back they wouldn't listen unless the owners would announce publicly that it was theirs. They indisputably broke the law in more than one way, and it sucks to see them getting off scot-free.

On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog. -- Cartoon caption

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