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+ - Rocket Lab Unveils "Electric" Rocket Engine 1

Submitted by Adrian Harvey
Adrian Harvey writes: The New Zealand based commercial space company Rocket Lab has unveiled their new rocket engine which the media is describing as battery-powered. It still uses rocket fuel, of course, but has an entirely new propulsion cycle which uses electric motors to drive its turbopumps.

To add to the interest over the design, it uses 3D printing for all its primary components. First launch is expected this year, with commercial operations commencing in 2016.

+ - The origin of the first light in the Universe

Submitted by StartsWithABang
StartsWithABang writes: Before there were planets, galaxies, or even stars in the Universe, there really was light. We see that light, left over today, in the form of the Cosmic Microwave Background, or the remnant glow from the Big Bang. But these photons outnumber the matter in our Universe by more than a-billion-to-one, and are the most numerous thing around. So where did they first come from? Science has the answer.

+ - CERN researchers confirm existence of the Force->

Submitted by mknewman
mknewman writes: Researchers at the Large Hadron Collider just recently started testing the accelerator for running at the higher energy of 13 TeV, and already they have found new insights into the fundamental structure of the universe. Though four fundamental forces – the strong force, the weak force, the electromagnetic force and gravity – have been well documented and confirmed in experiments over the years, CERN announced today the first unequivocal evidence for the Force. “Very impressive, this result is,” said a diminutive green spokesperson for the laboratory.
Link to Original Source

+ - Harvard researchers determine answer to beguiling question regarding flatus

Submitted by wbr1
wbr1 writes: Scientists working at the Harvard School of Public Health have solved the age old question, "who farted?"

By connecting a trace portal machine and independently derived machine learning algorithms, the source of an offensive (humorous) gaseous emission can be identified with 98.6% accuracy.

Steven Passovitz of HSPH states, "All humans have a unique mix of bacteria in their intestines. These colonies leave a distinct fingerprint of trace gasses in the excreted flatus of an individual. It does not matter how overlaid by old eggs or cabbage the particular flatus is, we can sniff you out."

+ - Tim Cook Puts His Dent In The Universe->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: From BuzzFeed: Tim Cook has long been an advocate for human rights and equality. With these two op-eds, he’s made Apple one as well. Both make it very clear that he’s speaking as Apple’s CEO or, in the case of the Washington Post piece, literally on behalf of Apple. Cook’s call for social progress is now Apple’s as well. And Apple, by joining him to make it, has smartly recognized that this is how Cook emerges from Jobs’ shadow to become an iconic company leader in his own right.
Link to Original Source

+ - In Daring Plan, Tomorrow SpaceX to Land a Rocket on the Earth

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com writes: The cost of getting to orbit is exorbitant, because the rocket, with its multimillion-dollar engines, ends up as trash in the ocean after one launching, something Elon Musk likens to throwing away a 747 jet after a single transcontinental flight. That's why tomorrow morning at 620 am his company hopes to upend the economics of space travel in a daring plan by attempting to land the first stage of a Falcon 9 rocket intact on a floating platform, 300 feet long and 170 feet wide in the Atlantic Ocean. SpaceX has attempted similar maneuvers on three earlier Falcon 9 flights, and on the second and third attempts, the rocket slowed to a hover before splashing into the water. “We’ve been able to soft-land the rocket booster in the ocean twice so far,” says Musk. “Unfortunately, it sort of sat there for several seconds, then tipped over and exploded. It’s quite difficult to reuse at that point.”

After the booster falls away and the second stage continues pushing the payload to orbit, its engines will reignite to turn it around and guide it to a spot about 200 miles east of Jacksonville, Florida. Musk puts the chances of success at 50 percent or less but over the dozen or so flights scheduled for this year, “I think it’s quite likely, 80 to 90 percent likely, that one of those flights will be able to land and refly.” SpaceX will offer its own launch webcast on the company's website beginning at 6 a.m. If SpaceX’s gamble succeeds, the company plans to reuse the rocket stage on a later flight. “Reusability is the critical breakthrough needed in rocketry to take things to the next level."

Humanity has the stars in its future, and that future is too important to be lost under the burden of juvenile folly and ignorant superstition. - Isaac Asimov

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