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Comment: Forever (Score 1) 44

by milimetric (#45808107) Attached to: </em>Prince of Persia</em> Level Editor 'Apoplexy' Reaches 2.0

I will love Prince of Persia as long as I live because it was a formative game for me. It taught me to have guts and just jump, but to practice my ass off before doing so. I will die at some point though (probably), and so will everyone else that feels like me. So I think odds are pretty strong that games like this will fade into oblivion. Think about it this way: do you know what board game your great-great-great-grandpa liked?

Comment: On PHP, religion, and why I'm always right. (Score 1) 519

by milimetric (#38572492) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Which Web Platform Would You Use?

The reason I dislike PHP is because it has a bunch of bizarre patched together conventions that don't make sense to me. But if they make sense to you and you're absolutely sure that your code is safe and maintainable, then it's the best framework for you. Someone mentioned asking this is like asking about religion and they're right. Since you asked, I'll point out the advantages I see with two frameworks I'm using today:

1. Google App Engine: super easy to get started and have something running. Lowest amount of code / task of any framework I've used.
2. ASP.NET MVC 3: clean separation of concerns that uses reflection and dependency injection (so there's very little configuration required). Lots of support on stackoverflow and asp.net/mvc.

Both of those are great for me mostly because I like and respect HTML/HTTP and want full control over some aspects of the request/response paradigm when I need to do fancier things like domain based routing. Both frameworks allow me to dive deep without complicating themselves too much. And I like C# 4.0 & Python 2.7, both are very pleasant to work with.

Comment: Re:Nonesense (Score 4, Informative) 191

by milimetric (#38563744) Attached to: Insiders Call HP's WebOS Software Fatally Flawed

"WebOS is crap"

I agree if you change it to this

"out-of-the-box WebOS is crap"

Though I still love WebOS and most things it stands for, for the reasons you mentioned. Here's what I did to make it not crap (I have a TouchPad and an HP Pre 3).

1. Install Preware: http://theunlockr.com/2011/09/16/how-to-install-preware-on-the-hp-touchpad/.
1.1. Install the patches that muffle system logging.
2. Install custom kernel and set the lowest CPU frequency allowed to 768, keep the max at 1.4 (for the HP Pre 3, same idea for the Touchpad, different freq.)
3. With your HP Pre 3 which comes unlocked for only ~ $200, sign up for an unlimited "non-smartphone" data plan with AT&T. This'll get you $10/month unlimited data.

These simple steps will get you a phone that's just as smooth as an Android device (iOS is still smoother), and $20/month cheaper for unlimited data, and without a contract. The downside is of course that you're now definitely deep inside geek territory installing custom kernels and what not. I'll say that I'm pretty sensitive to basement-nerd induced stress, and so far that's been low on WebOS compared to other open-sourcey crap like the new Ubuntu.

Comment: Re:Hello (Score 3, Interesting) 276

by milimetric (#38182960) Attached to: Palantir, the War On Terror's Secret Weapon

How very shallow. I'm coming at this from a radical left perspective, but I happen to think it's good to think things through before pulling your hair out and running around like a crazy person screaming bloody murder.

This story has no mention of any *new* civil liberties violations. Palantir *aggregates* existing data. If anything, this could help *limit* civil liberty violations. Palantir or a similar system means the government can actually use the data they are already collecting, which implies they can optimize it and get rid of spying tactics that never help deter crime. A logical person should probably agree that if there's a proven way to stop a crime from happening, it's in society's best interest to use it. The point of civil liberties isn't to protect criminals, it's to protect ourselves from the government's mistakes. I think Palantir will allow the government to make less mistakes and be more efficient.

Comment: Objectivity (Score 1) 276

by milimetric (#38182950) Attached to: Palantir, the War On Terror's Secret Weapon

To all the people talking about Big Brother: you are all very shallow. I'm coming at this from a radical left perspective, but I happen to think it's good to think things through before pulling your hair out and running around like a crazy person screaming bloody murder.

This story has no mention of any *new* civil liberties violations. Palantir *aggregates* existing data. This is extremely useful and, if anything, could help *limit* civil liberty violations. Palantir or a similar system means the government can actually use the data they have, which implies they can optimize it and get rid of spying tactics that never help deter crime. A logical person should probably agree that if there's a proven way to stop a crime from happening, it's in society's best interest to use that. The point of civil liberties isn't to protect criminals, it's to protect ourselves from the government's mistakes. I think Palantir will allow the government to make less mistakes and be more efficient.

Comment: Re:Better Place (Score 3, Insightful) 378

by milimetric (#38076294) Attached to: Research Promises Drastically Increased LiOn Capacity

Sure, if you look at it that way. But...

You don't need to store 1000 batteries, you only need to store enough for X hours worth of demand. So you take data on your gas station and find the busiest X hours in history, where X is the number of hours it takes to charge a battery. From that you find that you had N cars in your busiest X hours. So then you set up N charging stations with N spare batteries. You can multiply N by some fudge factor to give you the ability to handle failures, unprecedented spikes in demand, etc.

Hard numbers are indeed scary, and we humans are scaredy cats so we evolved this lovely brain to help us out.

Comment: Re:Switzerland experiments (Score 1) 594

by milimetric (#37994638) Attached to: Could Crowd-Sourced Direct Democracy Work?

This is the only post from someone qualified to comment on the subject. Everyone else is just speculating based on age old notions of what mob rule might look like. In my opinion, the world is different enough now from ten years ago that a direct democracy is worth a shot, at least in a controlled environment like Switzerland has.

Mob rule has a bad connotation because it's in the powerful minority's interest for it to be so. There's no fundamental characteristic of humans that makes them incapable of picking out a good future for themselves. As a matter of fact, the vast majority of human existence was spent under "mob rule". Now, of the hundred thousand years or so that we've been running around on two feet making cool weapons, let's list out the conflicts that resulted in massive life loss. And then let's list out the progress that we've made as a species and let's fairly compare mob rule to other systems. I might be biased, so other people should chime in. But here's my list so far:

Casualties:
- Most of these are instigated by warlords (Genghis, Julius, Alexander, Hitler, Napoleon, etc.): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_battles_by_casualties
- Also, most of these, even the Chinese rebellions (because there were always leaders): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wars_and_anthropogenic_disasters_by_death_toll

Progress:
- individual people, sometimes sponsored by their community, sometimes by states invented most of the things we find useful today.
- populist movements, especially the nonviolent kind, helped win us many of the human rights we enjoy today. Labor laws, equality of races, genders, etc.

Comment: In a perfect world (Score 5, Insightful) 1797

by milimetric (#37816596) Attached to: Ron Paul Wants To End the Federal Student Loan Program

I love Ron Paul. He's the most idealistic person I've ever known. He's basically lying to everyone though. Most of the things he says go like this:

1. Cut funding
2. ??? Allow free market to do it's thing ???
3. Problem solved

He doesn't mention two crucial things. One is that step 2. may take a very long time. The other is that for 2 to happen effectively, we have to equalize any unfair and corruption-driven advantages that others have gained in a crooked system over two hundred years. Once highly paid yuppies get busted for illegally claiming "expenses" as tax free money and corporations get busted for gambling with pension funds at the same rate that people get busted for stealing a piece of bread or robbing a grocery store, then we'll have a truly fair environment for the free market to do its thing. In the meantime, Ron Paul is selling pipe dreams. Awesome pipe dreams, but ultimately dreams without good plans to back them up.

Comment: Yoga (Score 1) 772

by milimetric (#37073510) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Am I Too Old To Learn New Programming Languages?

Seriously - Yoga.

I'm only 29 but I'm obsessed with the concept of getting older and losing my razor sharp skillz :)
So I do Yoga, stretch, relax, read, talk, play. If you fully enjoy life you'll find that technology is just a tool. Your brain will be flexible and fresh enough to adapt to any situation. At least that's what I tell myself.

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