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Comment: I still like my WinXP VMs (Score 1) 650

by mathew42 (#46681569) Attached to: Should Microsoft Be Required To Extend Support For Windows XP?

I like my Windows XP virtual machines running in VirtualBox. I can use them to connect to client VPNs without having the VPN client disrupt my network access, run different versions of software in separate environments, etc.

I could possibly consider moving to Windows 7, but apart from being able to search for programs from the Start menu, i really don't see any advantage. For a modern browser, Firefox & Chrome run perfectly when I need them.

I fully intend to keep running my WinXP VMs well into the future, but obviously not on the public internet. I probably should investigate using a Linux VM, but why change what works?

Comment: Re:Total BS. (Score 1) 279

by mathew42 (#45996277) Attached to: Heat Waves In Australia Are Getting More Frequent, and Hotter

That the west, esp. USA, is dropping their emissions, but china alone, emits more each year that destroys those savings. IOW, China is increasing faster than what the entire west can cut. This does NOT include other nations.

What happens when you use a per head of population metric? A http://io9.com/this-map-shows-which-countries-are-contributing-the-mos-1502047155 ranks Australia as low, but our population is 22.7million (0.33%). Compare that with China (1.351 billion = 19.1%) or USA (317.5 million = 4.45%).

Comment: Re:They have the money to do this (Score 1) 250

by mathew42 (#45692717) Attached to: Chinese Lunar Probe Lands Successfully

The two problems you need to solve are decedance and entitlement.

In Australia we've seen distinct waves of immigration: Europe after WWII, Vietnam in 70's. The parents work hard in low skilled jobs and push their kids to study hard. The kids become the doctors & lawyers, but the grandkids start to assimilate and don't work as hard. Coupled with this, the majority of society expects handouts from the government, but do not contribute back.

As for real men, what you are asking for is a benevolent dictator. The problem is very few have the moral character suitable for the job and they are almost always betrayed by corruption of the next couple of levels down.

Finally, I find it sad that rather than celebrating the achievement of the Chinese, there is more discussion about decay in the USA.

Comment: Re:Nonsense! - GAPS diet (Score 1) 160

by mathew42 (#45630575) Attached to: Gut Microbes Linked to Autism-Like Symptoms in Mice

You might want to read Gut and Psychology Syndrome | GAPS Diet by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. Some doctors in the UK and US are using this approach to treat autism with good results, but there no published studies that I'm aware of. The main focus points of the book are probiotics (like kefir) and eliminating artificial additives (e.g preservatives, colours & flavours), gluten and casein.

Friends with autistic children have noticed improvement by following the book, but as others have said autism is complex and not fully understood. We've noticed significant behavioural improvements, eczema cured and disappearnce of mystery ankle pains in our own non-autistic kids by eliminating presevatives, especially 282 found in many bread products. I wouldn't consider it scientifically proven but since the cost is minimal and risks (almost) non-existant, I would recommend trialing a GAPS diet.

Probiotics are now recommended by some doctors to restore gut health after a course of antibiotics.

Comment: Re:Fuck you Rupert Murdoch! (Score 1) 229

by mathew42 (#45616073) Attached to: Australia's $44B Broadband Network May Settle For Fiber Near the Home

The draft NBNCo Corporate Plan (2013) is available to understand what Labor were building. The reality is Labor turned the abundance of fibre into a scarce resource:

"As at 30 April 2013, 26% of NBN Co’s FTTP End-Users were on the highest available wholesale speed tier (100/40 Mbps), whilst 47% were on the entry-level wholesale speed tier (12/1 Mbps). These compare with 18% and 49% respectively forecast for FY2013 in the 2012-15 Corporate Plan."

Considering that it is $5 extra for 25Mbps, that 50% connected at 12Mbps are likely to place very low demands on their internet connection, making them perfect customers for mobile wireless especially if they use their mobile phone plan and once the heavier mobile wireless users migrate to a fixed line connection.

Comment: Re:What's the speed limit of copper? (Score 1) 229

by mathew42 (#45614731) Attached to: Australia's $44B Broadband Network May Settle For Fiber Near the Home

So if G.Fast can extend VDSL2 to 1 Gigabit at a couple hundred meters, are people really going to outgrow that by the end of the decade?

Since the average speed in Australia is 4.8mbit now it seems unlikely that people are going to be demanding 10gigabit connections in 7 years. Even 100mbit would be about 20 times their current average and VDSL2 can already do 100mbit for short distances.

In April 2013 according to the draft NBNCo Corporate Plan (2013) 47% of fibre connections were 12Mbps and the trend was up. The long term predictions out to 2028, show this barely changing while there is some movement in the faster plans (100Mbps) to even faster plans. In 2028 the percentage of 1Gbps is predicted to be still less than 5%.

Comment: Re:Not an issue, provided... (Score 1) 229

by mathew42 (#45614713) Attached to: Australia's $44B Broadband Network May Settle For Fiber Near the Home

And then when someone moves, and the previous occupier had fibre, but the new one doesnt want it, do you just leave that infrastructure floating?

One of the promises of fibre is that it is cheaper to maintain than copper so fibre on demand plans should be cheaper than FTTN of FTTP because the installation payment (~$3000) is made up front (or plan payments with ISP). Might sound expensive until you realise just the connection (AVC) for 1Gbps is $150/month to which you need to add RSP costs (including data at data (CVC) at $20/Mbps).

If youre going to do anything down a street you might as well do it just once, and get everyone on it in one go and then pull out the old infrastructure. They could probably recoup some of the build cost by recycling all of the copper they could pull out.

The problem is you need to find people who are willing to pay for the service. Current targets are for 70% of premises to connect and of that 50% will connect at 12Mbps and less than 5% connecting at 1Gbps in 2028.

Comment: FTTH: 47% connected at 12Mbps in April 2013 (Score 1) 229

by mathew42 (#45614271) Attached to: Australia's $44B Broadband Network May Settle For Fiber Near the Home

The draft NBNCo Corporate Plan (2013) is available to understand what Labor were building. The reality is Labor turned the abundance of fibre into a scarce resource:

"As at 30 April 2013, 26% of NBN Co’s FTTP End-Users were on the highest available wholesale speed tier (100/40 Mbps), whilst 47% were on the entry-level wholesale speed tier (12/1 Mbps). These compare with 18% and 49% respectively forecast for FY2013 in the 2012-15 Corporate Plan."

In Australia, Labor planned both quotas (1TB being the largest available from most RSPs) and speed tiers from 12/1Mbps to 1Gbps. The plan was for less than 5% to have 1Gbps speeds in 2028! This is because the high cost of data to RSPs ($20/Mbps) will make 1Gbps plans expensive.

Only a truly incompetent government could succeed in building a FTTP network where 50% of connections are slower than HFC, FTTN, 4G and approaching half of ADSL2+ connections. Sadly many in Australia were distracted by the headline speeds and failed to appreciate what was being promised.

The best suggestion I've heard yet is to simply loan Google $20 billion interest free for two decades and ask them to build a wholesale network.

Comment: Re:Wrong reaction. (Score 2) 213

by mathew42 (#45452873) Attached to: Australia Spied On Indonesian President

The point is that my government is doing that, and I strongly disapprove of it. Your government is doing that and you (perhaps) strongly disapprove of it. If we have the luck to live in democracies, it's our fucking duty to do something about it.

Actually, I'm not sure I disapprove of the Australian government spying on Indonesia. There are a number of issues in Indonesia that impact on Australia directly including: government stability, fundamentalist Islam, asylum seekers, human rights abuses (e.g Aceh, East Timor and West Papua). Having inside knowledge of the government's thoughts could prevent misteps and assist Australia in working with Indonesia using soft power.

History (Balibo Five, live cattle exports, suggests that Australia is not as skilled as we would like.

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