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Comment: Realistic / HP / Marantz / Thorens / Model M (Score 2) 702

by markzip (#46791815) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Tech Products Were Built To Last?
  • Realistic Radio Alarm Clock - Radio Shack's house brand, bought in 1981. Pounded every day since then.
  • HP Laserjet 6P - Prints and prints. When I ordered my new box I surprised the tech who was building it by insisting sure that he include a parallel port card.
  • IBM Model M - Makes me feel like I am doing "real" work when I type. I think mine is from 1989.
  • Thorens TT - Set it up properly, replace the belt and stylus every now and then, good to go. This has been my daily driver for 20 years. But it had a long life before that.
  • Marantz amp - from the mid-70s, just sits there and sound warm and generous all day, every day. Again, relatively recent to me (15 years), and had a long life before that.
  • The point is, buy the most that you can buy at the time you need it and don't cheap out on things you use every day. (Although the durability of the Realistic brand is a bit of a surprise)

Comment: Not network neutrality problem, a business problem (Score 3, Insightful) 182

by markzip (#46546843) Attached to: Level 3 Wants To Make Peering a Net Neutrality Issue

(Sorry, a properly grammatical title would not fit in the space allotted)

Netflix & Level 3 Only Telling Half The Story, Won’t Detail What Changes They Want To Net Neutrality

In a fairly deep and interesting article over at StreamingMedia.com, Dan Rayburn argues that there is more to the story here and that neither Netflix nor Level 3 are giving us their proposed solutions. He goes through both the Netflix and the Level3 blog posts, taking them apart very carefully.

It is not a network neutrality problem, but rather a business problem. Worthwhile read.

Comment: Re:I don't like the sound of this (Score 1) 155

by markzip (#44109267) Attached to: ICANN Working Group Seeks To Kill WHOIS
Thanks for this link. I read TFA, but I'm afraid that someone with a /. number as high as mine is still not really able to answer the questions on that survey. Perhaps someone with the /. number of 422 might explain? Quoting from the survey: The EWG is eager to obtain your input, including on the following questions:

Regarding the EWG's suggested Aggregated RDS model, are there additional advantages and disadvantages that should be considered? In such a model, which data repository (ARDS or Registry) should be considered authoritative?

Regarding the EWG's suggested Aggregated RDS model, are there additional advantages and disadvantages that should be considered? In such a model, which data repository (ARDS or Registry) should be considered authoritative?

Could the EWG's recommendations for purpose-driven authenticated Gated Access to validated registration data satisfy identified RDS users and their needs? In such a model, how would requestors be identified, authorized and issued RDS access credentials? In particular, who would accredit law enforcement agents, based on what criteria?

Could the EWG's recommendations for purpose-driven authenticated Gated Access to validated registration data satisfy identified RDS users and their needs? In such a model, how would requestors be identified, authorized and issued RDS access credentials? In particular, who would accredit law enforcement agents, based on what criteria?

Could the EWG's recommendations for addressing maximum protected registration satisfy both accountability needs and the privacy needs of at-risk individuals? How might a suitable solution be identified and funded?

Could the EWG's recommendations for addressing maximum protected registration satisfy both accountability needs and the privacy needs of at-risk individuals? How might a suitable solution be identified and funded?

Are the users and purposes identified by the EWG thus far sufficiently representative? Are there any significant gaps in users and purposes that must be addressed? Are the users and purposes identified by the EWG thus far sufficiently representative? Are there any significant gaps in users and purposes that must be addressed?

Given the desire for an extensible next-generation RDS that might accommodate the needs of a rapidly-evolving global Internet, how could future new users and purposes be accommodated? Who would decide on permitted purposes, using what criteria?

Given the desire for an extensible next-generation RDS that might accommodate the needs of a rapidly-evolving global Internet, how could future new users and purposes be accommodated? Who would decide on permitted purposes, using what criteria?

Are the registration data elements identified by the EWG thus far sufficiently representative of the data required for each identified purpose? Are there any significant gaps in data elements that must be addressed?

Are the registration data elements identified by the EWG thus far sufficiently representative of the data required for each identified purpose? Are there any significant gaps in data elements that must be addressed?

How should public and gated data elements be classified? What criteria should the EWG apply to make initial recommendations in this area?

How should public and gated data elements be classified? What criteria should the EWG apply to make initial recommendations in this area?

What community needs should be considered during the EWG's discussion of registration data storage duration, escrow and access log requirements?

What community needs should be considered during the EWG's discussion of registration data storage duration, escrow and access log requirements?

The EWG acknowledges that deploying and operating the suggested RDS will incur costs. In such a system, how could or should those costs be borne?

The EWG acknowledges that deploying and operating the suggested RDS will incur costs. In such a system, how could or should those costs be borne?

End quote

Comment: Re:Verizon (Score 3, Informative) 375

by markzip (#41534843) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Cell Phone Carrier In the US?
+1 to this
(Assuming you are going to be spending the majority of your time in an urban area)
Get an unlocked Galaxy Nexus (or whatever the next Nexus is) and use it on the Straight Talk T Mobile service.
Here's a pretty comprehensive guide: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=1646755 Plus, here's another vote for T-Mobile's customer service.

Comment: Re:Simple (Score 2) 515

by markzip (#41444155) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Actual Best-in-Show For Free Anti Virus?
One small note, MSE is *not* available for 64 bit XP. So in the (admittedly unlikely) case that your laptop has XP 64 bit on it you'll have to look further. Your first line of defense, as always, is safe surfing, but Avira is going OK for me. It'll annoy you with occasional pop-ups but they are easy to dismiss.

Comment: Re:Limited hardware supported, not by vendor thems (Score 1) 257

by markzip (#41274709) Attached to: For Android Users, 2012 Is Still the Year of Gingerbread
OK, is $30 a month reasonable enough for you? Assuming you are in the USA, you can buy the Galaxy Nexus (unlocked) from Google and use it on T-Mobile's Pay as you go service. Here are a couple of XDA threads which may help you out: [GUIDE] Smartphone Service for just $30/month [INFO][GSM] Own Your Cell Service ..with Prepaid and the Galaxy Nexus [UPDATED 5/24]

Comment: 18 trackers on TFA page. (Score 1) 103

by markzip (#40289965) Attached to: Google and Facebook Top Biggest Web Tracker List

Reprising the comment I posted over on TFA:

Disclaimer: "This ITWorld page contains at least eighteen trackers, including eight of the top ten listed in the article. Dan's eSarcasm site loads at least 5 trackers including three of the top five."

There, fixed that for you.

--

He had me until he praised the Wall Street Journal series. While the goal of informing non-technical people about tracking on the web is a good one, the series has been full of inaccuracies, omissions and sensationalism. WSJ seems to actively avoid telling people how easy it is to avoid/minimize tracking and AFAIK has never broached the obvious conflict of interest issue raised by their reporting.

Like most Slashdot readers am no fan of tracking and targeted advertising and I run the usual suite of blockers you would expect (Ghostery, AdBlock Plus, NoScript, FlashBlock, Better Privacy, etc etc. But intellectual rigor is even more important to me. It has been missing from the WSJ reporting.

Comment: Re:Compared to what? (Score 1) 226

by markzip (#38320554) Attached to: Why Android Upgrades Take So Long

This experience taught me: 1) Cell phone makers simply don't care about software. They have almost zero incentive to put effort into it and often have incentive NOT to invest in software. 2) Never run the stock install from the phone maker. Root it and install a custom mod that is much closer to vanilla Android as possible.

3) Buy a handset with vanilla Android on it to start with.

There, fixed that for ya.

Comment: Re:tl;dr (Score 1) 226

by markzip (#38320280) Attached to: Why Android Upgrades Take So Long

Seconded.
One plain vanilla phone on every carrier with every radio.

For all other phones: On starting the phone for the first time pop a dialog box:

Would you like to use plain vanilla android (with no enhancements for this particular device)?
OR
Would you like to use TouchWizSenseBlur a beautiful-finger-paint-like-buble-gum-super-duper-extras-which-will-love-you-all-night-long-and-cook-you-breakfast-in-the-morning-full-of-win-enhancements-for-your-personal-phone-and-life?

At the start of 2010 it looked like Google was going to try to go down this road with google.com/phone but then Verizon came calling and said "we don;t think so". Google got into bed with VZW on the issue of net neutrality for wireless networks and one of the victims was their project to change the way phones are bought and sold in the US. Perhaps Larry Page will revisit this in the future, but it's difficult to see how it fits into his "focusing" strategy. I'm not holding my breath that all this changes in the US any time soon.

And yes, I vote with my money. I bought an unlocked Nexus One through Google.com/phone on the very first day it went live and replaced it last month with an imported unlocked Galaxy Nexus GSM. And yes, it is a fine phone. When I showed it to the folks at the local Verizon store they were salivating. And then they offered to sell me cases and sleeves for it. They had those in stock, even if they still don't have a release date for the Verizon Galaxy Nexus phone itself.

Comment: Re:Wait what? (Score 1) 247

by markzip (#38032896) Attached to: Brits Rejecting Superfast Broadband

As an American, I feel sure these speeds must be mis-types by an order of magnitude. Right?

This. Many times over. It's just soooo frustrating sitting here in USA seeing the UK complain about speed and caps and prices. I'd *love* to have that problem. Of course Brits probably look at our US discussions of petrol/gas prices or taxes and have much the same reaction! Swings and roundabouts, I guess.

OS/2 must die!

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