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Comment: Re:Translation Time! (Score 1) 331

I couldn't agree more. Sales is not some evil thing that slimy boards make companies do -- its actually the reason that the company is around in the first place. If you dont think that's right -- stay in school and do research. My best experiences on the tech side were riding shotgun with sales. That is how you figure out what features are needed to close a deal vs which seem technically interesting. On the question of comp -- which is how this thread started -- its all about risk / reward. Technical people probably have a higher base comp than sales people -- sales people are comfortable having more at risk based on performance. If a sales / tech partnership is working well -- and a sales guy is hitting his numbers -- than comp may be similar after commission. If the sales guy is hitting it out of the park -- then his comp is going to be larger than his tech counterpart. so - if the tech base salary is already pretty high -- I wouldn't have that much of a delta based on successful sales -- perhaps 10-15 percent ( of salary ) based on good performance on the sales team -- if the tech person thinks they are getting ripped off in this -- they should move to sales where more is at risk -- but the sky is the limit on comp -- I have seen that happen and work well.

Comment: Re:yeah. its much better to be p0wned (Score 2, Informative) 552

by markov23 (#31280516) Attached to: Independent Programmers' No-Win Scenario
if you are an s-corp you need to have more than one client -- or the irs will eventually get annoyed. thats not that hard to do though - and this is what accountants are for -- to make sure you dont have issues like that. As someone who worked corporate and is independent now -- all of these reasons not to go independent are just fear talking. And the feeling that its safer inside of a corporation -- that is to put it bluntly - a lie you are telling yourself so you can sleep at night. the only barrier to working for yourself is getting over your fear, and getting your first client.

Comment: Re:Talk To Potential Acquirers (Score 1) 165

by markov23 (#30631358) Attached to: Finding Someone To Manage Selling a Software Company?
Ive sold companies and taken them public -- the channels for sales are the following: Lawyers -- in my market there are a couple of big law firms -- each has a deal guy for this stuff -- get to know him. This is what linked in is for -- not so much slashdot ip lawyers -- unless there is a patent here -- probably not. vc's -- this is really where you are -- you have a product - you proved it can sell ( the games you make, not the framework ) - and now you want to raise money for some business talent to help monetize it. be prepared to part with most of your company, lose control and have an outsider as ceo. Its not that bad -- and is really the stage you are at. not all of your team will want to do that -- too bad -- they can leave, but they will leave some ownership behind as well. if your company turns out to be sale worthy -- they as well as your new ceo will have the contacts to make it happen -- mostly that happens when you dont need it to. now for the next question -- how do you get vcs to pay attention to you -- thats still challenging -- but at least its the right problem. Good Luck

Comment: Re:As long as he knows how to ... (Score 1) 426

by markov23 (#30510852) Attached to: When Developers Work Late, Should the Manager Stay?
It is -- and there are a lot of people just as skilled as you that are out of work. Some of them might feel some ownership of the project and want to get it done. Some of them might understand that we write code for a living and this is part of the package. Some might leave at 5 when everyone else on the team is pulling an all nighter to get a project out the door. Its the job of the manager to make sure the project gets done -- then clear out any morale crushing behaviors that showed up -- because unemployment is at 10% right now -- Its 5pm and I have a new guy I need to interview.
Earth

The Limits To Skepticism 1093

Posted by kdawson
from the sometimes-you-just-gotta-say dept.
jamie found a long and painstaking piece up at The Economist asking and provisionally answering the question: "Does the spirit of scientific scepticism really require that I remain forever open-minded to denialist humbug until it's shown to be wrong?" The author, who is not named, spent several hours picking apart the arguments of one Willis Eschenbach, AGW denialist, who on Dec. 8 published what he called the "smoking gun" — it was supposed to prove that the adjustments climate scientists make to historical temperature records are arbitrary to the point of intentional manipulation. The conclusion: "[H]ere's my solution to this problem: this is why we have peer review. Average guys with websites can do a lot of amazing things. One thing they cannot do is reveal statistical manipulation in climate-change studies that require a PhD in a related field to understand. So for the time being, my response to any and all further 'smoking gun' claims begins with: show me the peer-reviewed journal article demonstrating the error here. Otherwise, you're a crank and this is not a story. And then I'll probably go ahead and try to investigate the claim and write a blog post about it, because that's my job. Oh, and by the way: October was the hottest month on record in Darwin, Australia."

Comment: Lesson of TSR (Score 3, Interesting) 174

by markov23 (#30281994) Attached to: Games Workshop Goes After Fan Site
We used to have a company called TSR that behaved this way -- they sued all of the their fans that tried to keep D&D alive and didnt understand the economics of this type of community. When wizards got the license -- regardless of all of the harping on this forum about them -- they embraced this type of community and created the OGL. Their discussion with publishers was we can either fight over each piece off the pie or try and make the pie bigger. It was a completely different approach and it worked amazingly well. GW will figure that out at some point -- or go away like TSR. GW has every right to protect their ip -- it is theirs and they spent a lot of money developing it -- it just may be bad business to go about it the way that they are. And Im sure ill get abused for this next comment -- but with all of the slamming of wizards in this forum about them not being open -- you are confusing open for free. Open is important for the community -- free is not. If free is the most important aspect of a gaming system -- stay away from rpgs -- I play them and I want professional content created by talented people -- and those people like to get paid.
Censorship

Modern Warfare 2 Not Recalled In Russia After All 94

Posted by Soulskill
from the it's-the-thought-that-counts dept.
thief21 writes "After claims that console versions Modern Warfare 2 had been recalled in Russia due to complaints from politicians and the gaming public over the infamous airport slaughter scene, it turns out the stories were completely untrue. Activision never released a console version of the game in Russia." Instead, they simply edited the notorious scene out of the PC version. They did this of their own volition, since Russia doesn't have a formal ratings committee.

Comment: Real reasons we cant tax this (Score 2, Interesting) 762

by markov23 (#30143502) Attached to: Calling B.S. On Amazon's Taxation Arguments
Besides the constitutional reasons that it is like this that will not change --- lets look at what would happen if you allowed local govts to enforce everyone to collect thier taxes. I know my fair city - Philadelphia -- would within a week decide that all items ordered on line were subject to a 15% tax that they wanted collected. They would cry poor and make all the same arguments here - but mostly they like taxing people that cant vote them out of office and would present this as a way to help local busineses. Soon every township that has a guy on the board that feels mail order places are biting into his business would tax this whole concept out of existance -- which is why we have a clause in the consititution that prevents interferance with inter state commerce -- because without it -- we would.

Comment: This is dumping (Score 1) 330

by markov23 (#30143318) Attached to: Less Than Free
This behavior is called dumping and is what monopolys get in trouble for. Selling something for less than your cost of production for the purpose of gathering market share and shutting out competition. If their name was Microsoft - they would be in court now.

Comment: Re:Sonos (Score 1) 438

by markov23 (#30020788) Attached to: Simple, Cost-Effective, Multiroom Audio?
because they just work and it fits the requirements. If you dont want to pull wire through your walls -- this is the way to go. If you are willing to pull wire and put speakers in the walls -- there are a couple of other options -- but the install then becomes more expensive than the gear -- and this is slashdot where the next post after a sonos post is 400 for an wireless device with a built in amplifier and an incredibly good interface that can be controlled with a touch screen or an iphone -- why dont we put a noisy linux box there, download some codec -- write an interface all by ourselves that our wife wont use and forget that we needed an amplifier - that would be cheaper.

3500 Calories = 1 Food Pound

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