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Comment: Re:This is a good thing. (Score 1) 190

by synaptik (#47934291) Attached to: Wave Power Fails To Live Up To Promise
A) Yes, I realized this after my haste to make the joke.
B) You have clearly missed that this was supposed to be a joke.
C) Had this story actually been about tides and not wind (see A above,) then I would be right: retarding the tidal bulges even more than they already are (via harnessing) would slingshot the moon even faster than the tides currently do.

Comment: Re:Six Missoins Each (Score 1) 186

It wouldn't suck if they made more profit on less revenue.

Sure it could.

For example, Boeing could take the $4B and spend $5B on R&D having negative profit; while SpaceX could take the $2B and make $1B profit.

But then Boeing's technology will have improved by $5B in R while SpaceX's will have only benefited 1/5th as much

Comment: Re:Dystopian v/s utopian (Score 1) 191

by deathcloset (#47918269) Attached to: Sci-Fi Authors and Scientists Predict an Optimistic Future

Keep in mind utopian failures are not a societal thing they are a species thing. In all cases human utopian societies are subverted and corrupted by a parasitical sub-species of humanity, psychopaths. Quite simply remove them and a lot of humanities problems will go away with them.

Be careful trimming our claws. You wouldn't want the 501st to have fought without a Lt. Speirs now would you?

"Winters assessed Speirs as being one of the finest combat officers in the battalion. He wrote in his memoirs that Speirs had worked hard to earn a reputation as a killer and had often killed for shock value.[7] Winters stated that Speirs was alleged on one occasion to have killed six German prisoners of war with a Thompson submachinegun and that the battalion leadership must have been aware of the allegations, but chose to ignore the charges because of the pressing need to retain qualified combat leaders."

I don't think they need to be done away with, but maybe they need to be better used or positioned: keep the claws, but keep them away from the face.

Comment: WIFI-Enabled Vital Organs?!?! (Score 5, Insightful) 183

by deathcloset (#47863283) Attached to: In France, a Second Patient Receives Permanent Artificial Heart
I strongly believe that in the not too distant future the number 1 thing that people will wonder why we were so dumb as to not notice it was a horrible idea was having every goddamn thing connected and communicating.

ROM people. ROM!!! (the second ROM was written in allcaps for emphasis)

You can't remotely exploit a device without a network or public interface.

We're so obsessed with connectivity and networks these days that we are blinded to the negatives of all this connectivity - thinking they are just problems of the system to be resolved rather than inherent aspects of the system which can not be gotten rid of.

Alrighty rant(off);
v Now since, like you, I love the internet and connected thingymabobs somebody please reply and give some really good counterarguments against my thinking that IP addresses+Organs is a bad idea.

Comment: Assuming it's open source, who cares. (Score 1) 47

by ron_ivi (#47844549) Attached to: Should Docker Move To a Non-Profit Foundation?
If it's managed well, who cares what the organization / tax structure of the backers are.

If it gets mismanaged by an individual, you'll get dozens of non-profits as well as corporations that are welcome to fork it and try to convince people to use their own forks

If it gets mismanaged by a non-profit, you'll get dozens of commercial companies and individuals that are welcome to fork it and try to convince people to use their own forks.

In the end, the best managed fork will win; regardless of how it's taxed.

Government

FAA Scans the Internet For Drone Users; Sends Cease and Desist Letters 222

Posted by timothy
from the and-now-you're-safe dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this news from Government Attic: "The FAA has released a set of cease and desist letters sent in 2012 and 2013 to people operating drone vehicles for a variety of purposes including: tornado research, inspecting gas well stacks, aerial photography, journalism education, and other purposes. Drone cease and desist letters sent during 2014 are available from the FAA upon request." The text of the letters (bureaucratically polite, but bureaucratically firm) often starts with notes indicating to the UAV operators to whom they were sent that the FAA became interested in them because it "became aware of" their web sites, or even because someone tipped them off about an article in a community newsletter. The letters go on to outline the conditions under which the FAA allows the operation of unmanned aircraft, and specifically notes: Those who use UAS only for recreational enjoyment, operate in accordance with Advisory circular 91-57. This generally applies to operations in remotely populated areas away from airports, persons and buildings, below 400 feet Above Ground Level, and within visual line of sight. On February 6, 2007 the FAA published UAS guidance in the Federal Register, 14 CPR Part 91 / Docket No. FAA-2006-25714 I Unmanned Aircraft Operations in the National Airspace System. Toward the end of the docket it says, ''The FAA recognizes that people and companies other than modelers might be flying UAS with the mistaken understanding that they are legally operating under the authority of AC 91-57. AC 91-57 only applies to modelers, and thus specifically excludes Its use by persons or companies for business purposes." Update: 09/07 02:16 GMT by T : Pray forgive the OCR that turned "persons" into "pecions" and "circular" into "arcular"; updated to fix those. Update: 09/08 11:07 GMT by T : Correction: Carl Malamud is not affiliated with Government Attic as this story originally described: sorry for the error.
United Kingdom

Watch UK Inventor Colin Furze Survive a Fireworks Blast In a Metal Suit 54

Posted by timothy
from the could-substitute-cherry-bombs-in-the-basement dept.
Nerval's Lobster writes Labor Day is nigh, and with it the official end of summer. It's time to pack away the umbrellas and beach towels, and perhaps spend a few minutes flipping through photos of all the fun times you had over the past couple months: the grilling, the trips, the fireworks oh yes, the fireworks Chances are pretty good that you've set off more than a few fireworks in your time. But Colin Furze, the British inventor and YouTube celebrity who once co-hosted Sky1's Gadget Geeks? Well, he puts everybody's love of fireworks to shame. He loves fireworks so much, in fact, that he built a giant metal suit so he could stand in the middle of an epic pyrotechnic display. No matter how good your own engineering skills (or strong your courage), it's inadvisable to try this at home. But it's sure fun to watch.

Comment: Zero-G is bad long term, but what about 1/6-G? (Score 4, Interesting) 109

by deathcloset (#47769645) Attached to: Eye Problems From Space Affect At Least 21 NASA Astronauts
This is an unintuitive wild speculation, but I wonder if these effects are a linear function of the gravity or if there is a more complex interaction.
In other words, if Alice spent 6 monts in zero-G and Bob spent 6 months in 0.166-G, and assuming equal eye health, would Bob have less damage than Alice or more?

Obviously the human body emerged out of a 1-G environment, so the eye has evolved with those pressures. But just because removing those pressures completely may result in harm, that is not to say that removing those pressures partially would be harmful.

The only non-zero-G astronauts I know of were the Apollo folks - but I can't find any information (or anectdotes from them) on the difference in physiological effects of zero-g versus 1/6th-G.

It seems like they would have experienced less intercranial pressure and would have had an actual reference for up and down.

Oh space be a harsh mistress.

Comment: Re:Not so sure it's harmless (Score 3, Informative) 251

by mabu (#47760995) Attached to: TechCentral Scams Call Center Scammers

I got a call two days ago from these people. I strung them along until they gave me a web address to go to in order to download some software and run it on my computer. Then while they were expecting me to do that, I ran a WHOIS on the host and IP, found out who was hosting them (it turned out to be an American company) and I contacted their abuse team and reported the site as being fradulent. 24 hours later, their web site was shut down.

It also helps when you contact their abuse department, that you tell them you work for an antivirus company and you're going to add the IP address of the site to your blacklist. In many cases, there are hundreds if not thousands of web sites operating from the same IP. They will take quick action rather than have one bad customer cause 900 other customer sites to not be accessible.

You know, the difference between this company and the Titanic is that the Titanic had paying customers.

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