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Comment: a good thing (Score 1) 470 470

And why not? Bill Gates has done a lot of good with this wealth; real tangible things. And it's not just about giving money, it's about being involved. He and his wife are both active in the process and that's what makes it impressive - they're not just signing checks. And why would anyone put Glenn Beck in the same sentence with the Pope, the Dalai Lama and Bill Gates? Except maybe for contrast with the Dark Side.

Comment: Re:I guess I'm an optimist... (Score 3, Insightful) 118 118

Blame the government? They didn't build the tank, the contractor did. The idea is for the contractor to build the item they bid upon to the specifications. How would the engineers know that these are at 65% of the expected fracture strength? Because they have specs.

Comment: not surprised (Score 2) 307 307

Not all that surprising. Back in the day, NT ran on MIPS and Alpha and you could compile native code for both from respective versions of Visual C. That was a long time ago but all the code infrastructure to support different CPU architectures are still there. 3rd party code is a different story.
Patents

8-Year-Old Receives Patent 142 142

Knile writes "While not the youngest patent recipient ever (that would be a four year old in Texas), Bryce Gunderman has received a patent at age 8 for a space-saver that combines an outlet cover plate with a shelf. From the article: '"I thought how I was going to make a lot of money," Bryce said about what raced through his brain when he received the patent.'"

Comment: pass on the savings (Score 1) 360 360

I haven't touched the white pages in ages. I'm all for getting rid of it. But it's interesting to note that as institutions have found ways to be both "greener" and more monetarily efficient, those cost savings have not come back to the consumer in the form of cheaper products and services.

Comment: Bogus (Score 1) 419 419

Totally bogus. This is just an attempt to kill the used book market. As it is, textbook revisions are introduced at a rate far higher than actual changes in content; all in order to make older used books obsolete. The entire textbook publishing industry is a sham. Look at so-called "international" editions - these are often identical to the US version, except maybe for physical differences (lighter paper for lower freight cost, or b&w instead of color to make it cheaper to print) or perhaps minor changes in language due to localization. Yet these books are not meant for domestic consumption even though they are perfectly capable of doing the job at a fraction (often 1/4 to 1/2) of the cost of an official US edition.
Crime

The Bomb Squad Olympiad Starts Today 43 43

The bomb suit relay and the robot obstacle course are just two of the events you can enjoy at the Bomb Squad Olympiad. Over the next three days squads from across South Carolina will compete and showcase their bomb defusing capabilities for the public. I hear the deep fried dynamite is especially good.
Classic Games (Games)

The Best Video Games On Awful Systems 272 272

Buffalo55 writes "For the most part, classic games manage to reappear on different systems. Just look at Nintendo. The publisher has done an excellent job bringing NES, SNES, Genesis and even old school Neo Geo titles to the Wii's Virtual Console, while Microsoft's Game Room brings the best of Atari's 2600 into the living room. Of course, not every console was a success. The '90s, in particular, saw quite a few flops from companies like Panasonic, Sega and Atari. Just because a system is a failure, though, doesn't mean all of its games suck. On the contrary, most of these machines have a few gems that fell between the cracks once the console croaked." What overlooked game on a failed platform would you like to see revived?

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