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Comment: Re:Flat UI Design (Score 1) 132

by jellomizer (#47524039) Attached to: Mac OS X Yosemite Beta Opens

I don't hate the Flat UI style. But for Microsoft and Apple to adopt it is not really their thing.

Google has always had the flat style, it was their thing.
With Microsoft and Apple doing it it makes them look like they are a cheap rip off.

Apple did start to go a little too far in the 3d thing. I think when they made the Dock background 3d perspective.

Microsoft in Windows 7 had a good balance.

Comment: Re:~50% have no degree... (Score 1) 157

by jellomizer (#47523889) Attached to: For Half, Degrees In Computing, Math, Or Stats Lead To Other Jobs

Now I argue to anyone who is thinking about skipping a degree to go straight to work is a bad idea. Because your job even with a 2 year degree will tend to have your career max out rather quickly.

But in terms of getting a job if you graduate with a 2 year degree or a 4 year degree you will tend to start out with the same types of jobs. So if you are not ambitious in moving up the food chain you can get a good job without the hassle of extra college education.

And still in most institutions you will be able to work up if you can prove yourself. However the degree is an extra tool in your life box to help you out.

A degree is really just a piece of paper stated that you have done some stuff at an acceptable level. You could have done this stuff without having someone grade you. But that paper still helps.

Comment: Re:Who would still want to work there? (Score 1) 65

by jellomizer (#47516663) Attached to: Microsoft FY2014 Q4 Earnings: Revenues Up, Profits Down Slightly

Microsoft is moving away from the home user market their old Bread and Butter and moving towards more to B2B and Government type of work. Kinda like IBM.
They are not going to switch over quickly, and they are going to try to gain consumer market again. But MS will be making more and more of its money from the boring stuff.

Comment: Ya, pretty much (Score 1) 904

by Sycraft-fu (#47513607) Attached to: The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

That is why when you play online shooters, which attract many immature males, "faggot" is the default insult. They are insecure about their sexuality, as most young men are, and thus being called gay is one of the more hurtful things to them. they externalize that, of course, and thus that is what they use by default against others. However if they find something that works better, they'll go after that. Race, age, nationality, etc, etc.

They are assholes, sociopaths sometimes, they want to hurt others and they choose whatever they think is the most effective way to do it.

For that matter humans in general do it, women included. Bill Burr ha some hilarious bits, based in truth as the best comedy is, about women steering a losing argument towards personal attacks against their man. Saying he has a little dick, is a momma's boy, that kind of thing.

Well, that really happens. It isn't because women are some horrible creatures, but rather because they are using the insults they have learned will hurt the worst, when they get mad and decide to turn to insults. It's what people do when they lash out.

The difference between a normal person and a troll/asshole/ITG/sociopath and so on online is that most people do it only when they are angry, when they are lashing out at another person. These asshats do it for fun, just to get a rise out of people, and so on.

It is not something to be celebrated, or even tolerated (in any community I moderate trolling is a fast way to the banhammer) but trying to act like it is a problem limited to or directed at women is silly.

Comment: Re:Let's draw a distinction here... (Score 2) 904

by Sycraft-fu (#47513585) Attached to: The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

Of course it is assholes acting out. That's what happens when you remove consequences. Games have been an excellent example of that in terms of gameplay and mechanics. There have been games that have tried the whole "No rules but what the players make, they'll work out a stable system." No, actually it devolves in to a bunch of griefer assholes, and everyone else leaves. These people can't do that kind of thing in real life because they'd face consequences.

Sociopaths learn to moderate their behaviour in the real world because if they don't, they get punished. Online, they can run rampant and so they do.

Comment: No shit (Score 2) 92

by Sycraft-fu (#47510777) Attached to: Buying New Commercial IT Hardware Isn't Always Worthwhile (Video)

We consolidated about 20ish old servers (and added new systems) in to two Dell R720xds that are VM hypervisors. Not only does this save on power n' cooling but it is way faster, more reliable, and flexible. It is much easier and faster to rebuild and stand up a VM, you can snapshot them before making changes, if we need to reboot the hypervisor or update firmware we can migrate VMs over to the other host so there's no downtime. Plus less time is wasted on admining them since there are less systems, and they are newer.

On top of that they have good support contracts, and some excellent reliability features that you didn't get on systems even 5ish years ago (like actively scanning HDDs to look for failures).

Big time win in my book. Now does that mean we rush out and replace them with new units every year? No, of course not, but when the time comes that they are going out of support, or more likely that usage is growing past what they can be upgraded to handle, we'll replace them with newer, more powerful, systems. It is just a much better use of resources.

Comment: Is this all necessary? (Score 5, Insightful) 98

Seems like you are trying to work out a solution to a problem you don't have yet. Maybe first see if users are just willing to play nice. Get a powerful system and let them have at it. That's what we do. I work for an engineering college and we have a fairly large Linux server that is for instructional use. Students can log in and run the provided programs. Our resource management? None, unless the system is getting hit hard, in which case we will see what is happening and maybe manually nice something or talk to a user. We basically never have to. People use it to do their assignments and go about their business.

Hardware is fairly cheap, so you can throw a lot of power at the problem. Get a system with a decent amount of cores and RAM and you'll probably find out that it is fine.

Now, if things become a repeated problem then sure, look at a technical solution. However don't go getting all draconian without a reason. You may just be wasting your time and resources.

Comment: Re:Crazy (Score 2) 774

by jellomizer (#47494031) Attached to: States That Raised Minimum Wage See No Slow-Down In Job Growth

Minimum wage is actually not the big of a deal.
Most Companies do not pay their employers minimum wage they pay them higher.
Minimum wage usually will go the the Teens first job, And other part time work.
For people who are working full time, they get paid above the minimum wage.
The exception is for Tip workers. Where these laws do not effect as much anyways.

Most of the growth activity is actually in areas that don't pay minimum wage anyways.

In short minimum wage laws do the following.
For the Democrats it make it look like they are looking out the little guy, with a law without any real benefit or cost.

For the Republicans it gives them a talking point against the democrats, explaining how they are not focusing on the big picture and trying to keep jobs.

Nither side is really that effective, or hazardous. Until you get a significant increase in wages. Say $20 minimum wage, where it would be enough for the low end workers to have a significant improvement in quality of life, however at the same time, making many jobs much to expensive to maintain, and force companies to find ways to improve efficiency or outsource.
 

Comment: You first (Score 1) 272

Figure out what level of energy use, as a whole, is acceptable by your calculations. Then figure out how much that means you get to use. Make sure to include all forms of energy usage, such as heating and energy used in building and delivering goods. Adjust your energy use to meet that level, and see how that goes. Then we can talk. Otherwise, kindly STFU.

The reason I say this is not because I'm against trying to reduce energy consumption, I think conservation is always a good idea when practical, but because I'm sick and tired of hypocritical online eco-whiners. They'll bitch about how "people" should do something yet are unwilling to do it themselves. Somehow they see it as ok to bitch that others should be willing to make sacrifices but don't make any themselves.

So put up or shut up. Don't whine that "people" need to change their energy use, but then continue to live an energy intensive first world lifestyle. You are people too. If you cannot or will not adjust your usage, why would you assume anyone else would be willing?

Comment: No kidding (Score 0) 152

by Sycraft-fu (#47486671) Attached to: Dell Starts Accepting Bitcoin

I think a more accurate description of the Bitcoin community would be "highly greedy" or "has a poor understanding of economics". I don't think technical has anything to do with it. In fact if you've some technical knowledge, some understanding of the size of the financial system, and then knowledge about the bitcoin protocol you quickly come to the realization that it has a deal breaker problem (it has several in fact) and that is that it can't scale to be the amazin' world wide currency the faithful want it to be, it can't handle the transaction load that things like the Visa network does, because of the nature of the protocol.

So all the technically savvy people I know do not involve themselves in bitcoin.

Basically I see a few types of people who are in to bitcoin:

1) Hedge fund traders/scammers/etc. Basically people out to make a quick buck. They don't believe in Bitcoin other than they believe they can make money on it due to the volatility, complete counterparty risk, etc. It is just a market to be exploited and left.

2) Self described "Crypto-anarchists" aka "greedy wannabe libertarians" who think that bitcoin will free them from the tyranny of having to pay taxes for such unnecessary things like roads, clean water, and such. They like it because they think it'll lead to a world where they get to keep their money and be free of laws.

3) Doomsdayers/gold-bugs who have a poor understanding of the concept of money (namely that it is a theoretical construct and always has been, regardless of what item is used to represent it) and think that the world and economy are doomed, but if you have the right magic currency, you'll be ok. Because bitcoin has something "backing it" that makes it worth something no matter what and thus it is great.

4) People using it for money laundering, like the Silk Road. They use it because they figure it is harder to trace than dollars/euros/etc and so use it for payment for illegal items.

I owe the public nothing. -- J.P. Morgan

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