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Comment: Re: Uh What? (Score 1) 147

by ladoga (#49704621) Attached to: Mechanical 'Clicky' Keyboards Still Have Followers (Video)

The only downside to the unicomp keyboards is that the main metal plate inside with the contacts inside is assembled by melting the heads of dozens of plastic "rivets", forming a permanent seal that would need to be ground-off, then be very difficult, or impossible to re-attach. Would be far better if they just screwed it together.

You can replace plastic rivets with nuts and bolts: http://imgur.com/a/QroSL

Also have you tried to wash the keyboard? (disassembled as much as you can or atleast removing keys and springs first). You can put it thru dishwasher, just remember dry it throughly before plugging back in. (putting key sockets facing a fan for a day or maybe using hair dryer). I've washed one model M in a shower and let it dry on the balcony for a week and it works well.

Comment: Re: ... and lied like a Turk when he said it. (Score 1, Informative) 216

by ladoga (#49577199) Attached to: How Google Searches Are Promoting Genocide Denial

"propaganda and murder" isn't a trait of a people, but tools of ruling elite, including some Byzantine(that is Greek who pretends to be Roman) emperors.

Maybe you slept during the history class? Byzantine as a term was coined by Germans in the 1500s in an attempt to revise history as the Holy Roman Empire wanted to paint itself as successor of Rome. (It seems to have worked suprisingly well) Both "Byzantine Empire" and "Eastern Roman Empire" are terms created after 1453 (the fall of Constantinople).

The Empire now called as "Byzantine" was called Imperium Romanum (Latin) or Basileia Rhomaion (Greek) and it's citizens were called Romans regardless of the language they spoke. It's the very same Roman Empire with uninterrupted line of Emperors from the time of Caesar and not "Greek who pretends to be Roman" as you falsely claim. During the 600s they changed the offical language from Latin to Greek (administration and army) as it was practical to do so since that was the lingua franca in most of the areas controlled by the Empire.

Comment: Re:This is (sort of) good news for Americans (Score 1, Troll) 215

by ladoga (#49036549) Attached to: Russia Seeking To Ban Tor, VPNs and Other Anonymizing Tools

You mean, Georgia, Ukraine and (brewing) Moldova? With functional takeover of a number of ex-USSR countries as well (Georgia, Ukraine and Moldova differ only by daring to stand up to Russia)? And aiding bloody coups elsewhere?

Don't forget Chechenya. That war basically brought Putin into power.

Moscow apartment bombings were executed to get a pretext for invading Chechenya (2nd war). FSB even got caught planting one of the bombs. Guess who was leading the FSB back then? Guess who blamed it all to Chechens?

For Putin, killing thousands of people is nothing. He will do just about anything to stay in power. I don't really think he needs to be paranoid even. With all the crimes he has done, whoever follows might not be easy on him

Comment: Re:ok. i'll play. "my experience is... (Score 1) 39

by ladoga (#48876595) Attached to: Jim Blasko Explains 'Unbreakable Coin' (Video 2 of 2)

That does not follow. A large company can accept Bitcoins and convert immediately to their local currency. That does not require faith in a long-term forecast.

Implementing an infrastructure to handle a new payment protocol isn't free. Would you bother to add support for something that isn't going to be around?

Comment: Re:Bitcoin (Score 2) 290

by ladoga (#48827535) Attached to: Bitcoin Volatility Puts Miners Under Pressure

The Roman Empire lasted another 200 years after the currency was fully debased to 5% silver in 270 CE. That's pretty fucking good by historical standards, especially since the first 100 years of that were reasonably stable and prosperous.

Roman empire (Imperium Romanum) lasted well into middle ages. It ended with the fall of Constantinople to Ottoman Turks in 1453.

I know Catholics like to rewrite history, but Romans made no such difference. In fact the city of Rome wasn't even capital of the empire after 330 CE when emperor Constantinus named Constantinople as the new capital. Trade in the east meant that's where the money was and the court moved accordingly.

Western parts were administered from Ravenna (Mediolanum) between 330 and 426 as the Rome (the city) fell into relative insignificance before falling to Goths. Rome was reconquered by the Roman Empire during Gothic wars in 535-554 CE.

Comment: Re:Bitcoin was invented so that... (Score 1) 46

The very very low transaction costs of cryptocurrency is only true for a very small population of very technically sophisticated persons -- maintaining safe and secure encrypted data backups involves the kind of skillset that companies pay good money for, so doing this as a hobby is not exactly "free" in any practical sense. The rest of us will need to lean on exchanges, and factor in how to pay for insurance against another apparent (IMHO) inside job like MtGox.

No need for encypted data backups. Transactions are all in the blockchain, not on your computer and addresses (and private keys) can be generated offline. It's enough if you just print your private keys on paper and keep those safe. The only way to lose your bitcoins is to lose your private keys.

This also the reason why storing bitcoins on an exchange is a bad idea. If you don't have the private key those bitcoins are not really yours.

Comment: Re:kph.. (Score 1, Troll) 419

by ladoga (#48393465) Attached to: Japanese Maglev Train Hits 500kph

kph is routinely used in many metric countries. it's not at all unusual to see it.

Then they do it wrong. Do they also not begin their sentences with capital letters?

I guess we agree that kilometre (or kilometer for the US) is an SI unit. So in the International System of Units:

k = kilo (prefix for one thousand)
m = metre (base unit of length)
h = hour (unit of time)

Thus the correct unit symbol for kilometre(s) per hour is either km/h or kmh^-1. It's really that simple.

Comment: WNDR3800 (Score 1) 427

by ladoga (#47636143) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Life Beyond the WRT54G Series?
I've had a Netgear WNDR3800 running a customized OpenWRT build by arokh https://forum.openwrt.org/view... for past couple of years and I've been very happy with it. My experience with routers is limited, but it's hands down the best router I ever had.

Custom firmwares can be installed from the stock web interface (same as normal firmware update). It has plenty of processing power and RAM and has been very reliable. Between firmware updates it has regularly clocked over a year of uptime without a hiccup.

Comment: Re:Of course they are... (Score 2) 417

by ladoga (#44146255) Attached to: Snowden: NSA Spying On EU Diplomats and Administrators

his is why the US catches Russian sleeper agents occasionally... or busts Chinese spies. This happens all the time. And the general convention on the matter is that if we don't punish their spying we won't punish their spying.

Being in company of China and Russia with your track record isn't something I'd consider to be proud about.

Comment: Re:mother of all languages (Score 2) 323

by ladoga (#43651319) Attached to: English May Have Retained Words From an Ice Age Language
In Finnish mother is "Ãiti". There also exists another word for mother "emo", but it's not used anymore in reference to human mother (except few local dialects), only when referring to mothers of other animal species. Though I think Estonian ("ema") and some other Finno-Ugric languages still have it in its original meaning.

BTW. Wouldn't it be time for slashdot to support accented letters already? Ã is a with two dots over it, pronounced like letter a in english word ash.

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