Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: This bill prohibits telemarketing to cellphones... (Score 1) 619

by krbvroc1 (#37555674) Attached to: Congress May Permit Robot Calls To Cell Phones

I just looked at the bill. It says

‘‘(iv) to any telephone number assigned to a cellular telephone service, specialized mobile radio service, or other radio
  common carrier service, or any service for which the called party is charged for the call, unless the call is made for a commer
cial purpose that does not constitute a telephone solicitation;’’.

The problem is that the current law is not enforced. Just in the past few days I got multiple machine dialed calls from someone trying to sell me a Home Security system. Not only was it my cellphone, but the cell number is on the Do Not Call list.

Comment: Re:From the TFA (Score 3, Insightful) 301

It makes sense. Think about all the business that T-Mobile lost while this thing was pending. People did not renew, some people did not switch to T-Mobile due to the uncertainty, etc. If it DOESN'T go through, T-Mobile needs to be compensated for that loss.

Comment: How is that free market working for us? (Score 2, Insightful) 827

by krbvroc1 (#29025599) Attached to: US Cell Phone Plans Among World's Most Expensive

Among the most expensive and not even for a service that is advanced compared to other countries systems. And so called competition between carries is for which carrier can offer you which features for a high price ($55) plan. There is no real competition when it comes lower cost plans. And finally, my opinion for the most expensive, the lack of open systems. Carriers lock people into certain models of phones. Those lock-ins not only keep customers from shopping for the best service/price, but requires the carriers to earn even more profit to subsidize the exclusive contracts with the phone vendors.

Comment: Here is what I know... (Score 2, Informative) 645

From reading the various comments, it appears that someone illegally sold the books in question using the
Amazon 'self-publishing' feature. In other words, Amazon had no right to sell the book in the first place.

Amazon certainly failed in its responsibility to ensure it was only selling things it was entitled too. And Amazon has yet to clearly state that this is what actually happened.

But I think the respresentations in the media so far is that the publisher of Orwells books changed their mind, which does not appear to be the case. If that happened, people who had purchased the book already would still have their purchase. Rather, in this case, Amazon sold 'stolen merchandise', and the technology behind the Kindle allows recourse unlike a physical book.

Privacy

+ - US Govt tracks travel abroad - even hotel bed size-> 1

Submitted by
mytrip
mytrip writes "The Bush Administration has been collecting detailed records on the travel habits of Americans headed overseas and the luggage they bring with them, whether they fly, drive or take cruises abroad.

The Bush Administration has been collecting detailed records on the travel habits of Americans headed overseas, whether you fly, drive or take cruises abroad — not simply your method of transit but the personal items you carry with you and the people you stay with, according to documents and statements obtained by the Washington Post.

According to the Post, "The DHS database generally includes 'passenger name record' (PNR) information, as well as notes taken during secondary screenings of travelers. PNR data — often provided to airlines and other companies when reservations are made — routinely include names, addresses and credit-card information, as well as telephone and e-mail contact details, itineraries, hotel and rental car reservations, and even the type of bed requested in a hotel.""

Link to Original Source

Everyone can be taught to sculpt: Michelangelo would have had to be taught how not to. So it is with the great programmers.

Working...