Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment The Elephant in the Room (Score 1) 504 504

Depending on the circumstances, the employer may or may not be legally entitled to use the code how they like. But there's enough discussions here on what constitutes development. But...

The developer may not have been legally entitled to collect a paycheck to work on GPL software on company time.

You hear horror stories all the time going everywhere from rent-a-coder to some utility bundled on the Microsoft CD, where the employer had the expectation that they owned the code, only to find out a developer cheated and used some GPL code.

Since the developer even said that there was no written of verbal agreement with the company, the default assumption would be that they are paying you to write code that they will own.

I don't want to get into legal quibbles here, but the developer has basically defrauded the company if he got paid to deliver code that they can't use because of the license.

Comment Re:What would be the point of encrypting the datab (Score 1) 510 510

Well you would have the administrator manually mount the encrypted db after a reboot and type the passphrase at that time, not hardcode it in the app. It doesn't help when someone cracks the running system. It does help when they steal the server or the database files. You pretty much get the same benefits as full drive encryption.

Comment Definition of PII from the text of the law (Score 5, Informative) 510 510

"""
Personal information, a Massachusetts resident's first name and last name or first initial and last name in combination with any one or more of the following data elements that relate to such resident: (a) Social Security number; (b) driver's license number or state-issued identification card number; or (c) financial account number, or credit or debit card number, with or without any required security code, access code, personal identification number or password, that would permit access to a resident’s financial account; provided, however, that “Personal information” shall not include information that is lawfully obtained from publicly available information, or from federal, state or local government records lawfully made available to the general public.
"""

So this doesn't apply to places like slashdot and facebook. Only places that should be securing your data in the first place.

Comment Re:Why choose Ubuntu? Why not something else? (Score 2, Interesting) 165 165

When Fedora first came out, I felt like Red Hat went out of their way to make fedora the "hobbiest" version, and RHEL the "corporate" version. Have they got more or less divergent as time has gone on? It's kind of nice to run the same version of the software at home and in the server room, where Ubuntu is Ubuntu is Ubuntu. One less thing to deal with. Just wondering if I should give Fedora another try...

Comment Re:Bicycling (Score 1) 347 347

Uh, I'm just responding specifically to the claim that a bicylist breaking the law only endangers himself.

How does slamming on the breaks when a bicyclist runs a red light or darts out of a blind alley make me an unsafe driver?

Comment Re:Monolithic Kernel = Death of Self-Teaching (Score 2, Insightful) 742 742

So did you write a new manpage for futex(2). ;-)

(Maybe that'd be a good way for a newbie to start contributing. Adding documentation and updating manpages as they get to know the kernel, and scoring cred that way. Of course most developers hate writing docs.)

Comment Re:Linux? Yawn... boring... (Score 1) 742 742

Slashdot was written in someone's spare time... All I'm saying is there were plenty of shiny new things back then in the ancient olden times before smart phones that were sexier than kernel hacking. A lot more shiny new things and opportunities between 1995 and 2000 than there are now. It's just silly to say that the dot-com-mania era didn't have anything more exciting to offer than today's smartphones.

Comment Re:older developers... (Score 1) 742 742

Forgive me for asking, but what the hell is a binary sort? I thought I was just being dense, but none of the items on the first page of a "sort algorithm" search list a binary sort as a popular sorting algo. Do you mean binary search? (I'm hoping it's just a typo and I'm not that out of it...)

If it is a Miracle, any sort of evidence will answer, but if it is a Fact, proof is necessary. -- Samuel Clemens

Working...