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Comment Quality Assurance (Score 5, Insightful) 332

Lots of software companies will either hire you on staff or contract with you as a freelancer to do remote quality assurance on their products.

You can pitch your writing & communication skills as an asset here. Instead of saying: this doesn't work, you can write reasonable, reproducible, clear defect and quality reports.

Comment More Advanced Stuff (Score 1) 516

I stick in more advanced stuff into my code when I can, but that is always on the sly

Please don't do this. Resist the urge to get clever for the sake of being clever. This will almost always come back to bite you (or more likely a coworker) later in time.

With software, less is definitely more so try to write as little code as possible to solve te problem at hand.

Comment My smart phone is great at everything except... (Score 2, Interesting) 519

making phone calls.

Seriously. I love my HTC Hero (Android 2.1) as a PDA but the phone call capability is not very good on it. If I'm doing something and a phone call comes in, sometimes I might miss it or the phone will freeze for a few seconds before the call comes through. Ever tried calling someone while they're calling you? Good luck with that on this phone. Oh well, thankfully, I don't make too many calls

Submission + - Futurama Writer Creates New Math Theorem (

kevin_conaway writes: In the latest episode of Futurama, writer Ken Keeler wrote and proved a new math theorem based on group theory. From the article:

We all knew the writing staff of Futurama was brainy, but this is something else. In the episode “The Prisoner of Benda,” the Professor and Amy use a new invention to switch bodies. Unfortunately, they discover that the same two brains can’t switch twice and have to come up with some equation to prove that, with enough people switching, eventually everyone will end up in their rightful form. To work out the ridiculous brain switching plot line, writer Ken Keeler (who also just happens to have a PhD in mathematics) ended up writing and proving an entirely new theorem

Comment No thanks (Score 1) 117

Perhaps this announcement explains why the Popcorn Hour C-200 is such a disaster. I had such high hopes for that device but it seems like Syabas spent little to no time on QA. They advertised wireless capability and shipped the device without a driver, the blu-ray drive they "approved" is EOL and there is a list of issues as long as my arm.

To me, it appears they were busy with the PopBox and didn't spend enough time on the C-200. I'll pass on anything from these guys in the future

Comment Sic? (Score 1) 316

From the summary:

How has [sic] the Department of Homeland Security and the Transportation Security Administration...

Why was the sic added to this statement? I'm not an English major but I don't find that sentence to use any archaic or incorrect spellings nor do I find the grammar to be wrong.

Comment Try the Joel Test (Score 4, Insightful) 569

For a software position, try to see how well the company scores on the Joel Test:
  1. Do you use source control?
  2. Can you make a build in one step?
  3. Do you make daily builds?
  4. Do you have a bug database?
  5. Do you fix bugs before writing new code?
  6. Do you have an up-to-date schedule?
  7. Do you have a spec?
  8. Do programmers have quiet working conditions?
  9. Do you use the best tools money can buy?
  10. Do you have testers?
  11. Do new candidates write code during their interview?
  12. Do you do hallway usability testing?

Comment Re:wood for the trees (Score 5, Insightful) 209

Why aren't classified information on a separate network, not connected to the Net

It is, in fact there are multiple, separate networks.

Other than the author repeating the word "sensitive" over and over again, there wasn't anything concrete in the article about whether the information was actually classified. I suspect it wasn't.

"The most important thing in a man is not what he knows, but what he is." -- Narciso Yepes