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Comment: Re:You're dying off (Score 1) 284

by jp10558 (#49749495) Attached to: The Auto Industry May Mimic the 1980s PC Industry

Well, now you're moving the goalposts aren't you? Putting something up as collateral doesn't mean you don't own it, at least not to anyone I've ever talked to.

Do you also believe that if I'd bought the car (at a much higher interest rate) with an unsecured personal loan I'd also not own it?

And if you're going to talk about property seizure if you're severely delinquent on a debt, well none of us own anything... Just look at people who didn't pay their debt, went to court and were ordered to pay, and didn't - eventually the local sheriff can come and start auctioning off property to get that judgement paid.

So I don't really get your point. I own the car for any purpose I can imagine. Heck, I can even sell the car to someone else, and either they or I can pay off the loan. I've done this several times when trading in a car. Now, it'd be crazy for someone to pay me full value of the car without taking the lein into account, but that's really no different than taking expected maintenance or wear item replacement into account.

However, as far as I know, the purchaser doesn't have to do that, and can keep making payments or contract with me to keep making the payments, and as long as the lein is made good, it doesn't matter who owns the car.

It's like you can't wrap your head around buying debt obligations along with assets, but this is very common in many situations, and would also apply here.

Comment: Re:Oh please (Score 1) 284

by jp10558 (#49724869) Attached to: The Auto Industry May Mimic the 1980s PC Industry

Ummm, Kit Cars already exist. No one takes them seriously because 1) they're a lot of work to put together and 2) they pretty much never are as safe or look as good as factory built.

And that's a big problem - Cars have to meet all sorts of safety and emissions standards. Anyway, Android didn't disrupt pricing any, there were cheap phones before, and there are cheap phones now. A FLOSS OS doesn't do much of anything to reduce the cost of a car.

Comment: Re:You're dying off (Score 1) 284

by jp10558 (#49724569) Attached to: The Auto Industry May Mimic the 1980s PC Industry

I live in NY. It says Title on it, not Certificate of Title. It also says don't lose it as it's the only proof I own the vehicle. It has one Lien recorded for the loan. No where does it say you need to exchange this for the "real" Title.

Every time I've traded in a car, or sold a car, I use the title, and sign on the back that I've transferred ownership of the car.

Maybe your state is different, or NY prints "Title" when they mean something else...

Comment: Re:You're dying off (Score 1) 284

by jp10558 (#49720145) Attached to: The Auto Industry May Mimic the 1980s PC Industry

You don't legally own the car until the title is transferred.

Transferred to whom? I guess it depends on where you live, but I get the title, and it's in my name. The bank never sees the Title. The title is issued to me directly from the state, usually in a couple weeks from when I get the car from the dealership.

Comment: Re:An ever bigger torpedo (Score 1) 228

by jp10558 (#49636925) Attached to: Self-Driving Big Rigs Become a Reality

I still think that the biggest challenge is weather.

Have you ever used some of the adaptive cruise controls like Subaru's Eyesight? Granted, it's just keeping you a set distance behind the car in front, but I've run it through the recent Upstate NY winter. I've been impressed and how well it works - it basically works in 99% of situations where I work for driving. The last 1% where it shuts down, it's so dark and foggy and rainy or snowing so bad it's debatable if a human ought to drive in that, as they can't really see what's going on.

And this is the "Windows 3.1" of the technology. While I accept there will likely always be some situations where it gets "stuck", I also expect you'll be able to remote in to it like a drone pilot to have a human intervene when necessary. But I expect it will get rarer and rarer for that to be necessary.

Comment: Re:nonsense (Score 1) 532

by jp10558 (#49632261) Attached to: The Medical Bill Mystery

I imagine it depends on the doctor. It's pretty much a given that when I go for a Physical I'm going to have bloodtests done for some reason. The Doctor says he likes to do it, so he does. I imagine it probably helped him get in front of some illness once for a patient, and it stuck with him as a good idea. I don't love it as it's a PITA, and I have to make another appointment to get it done, but it's more of a PITA to try and find another doctor.

Comment: Re:No lack of knowledge? (Score 1) 216

by jp10558 (#49629729) Attached to: Police Can Obtain Cellphone Location Records Without a Warrant

And worse than that is that you often cannot get informed. I.e. if you ask a lawyer if some action is fair use in a copyright case, or if you ask if some other action is legal, you may often get "We won't know till you get a ruling in court" which is not exactly conducive to remedying one's ignorance. If a skilled practitioner can't give you a pretty good idea of if something is OK or not - then Ignorance should definitely be a defense.

Comment: Re:No cuts are ever possible (Score 1) 198

by jp10558 (#49577327) Attached to: House Bill Slashes Research Critical To Cybersecurity

And this is why trying to cut programs is really hard - because a large portion of the population wants most / all the programs. I also think it's well known in Washington DC that the people they're supposed to be representing want many / most of the programs so it's a bit cynical to keep talking about cutting programs, or at least about being able to do so selectively. The across the board cut seemed to work, though I don't know that anyone was happy with it.

Comment: Re:well, why wouldn't they? (Score 1) 198

by jp10558 (#49577249) Attached to: House Bill Slashes Research Critical To Cybersecurity

I'm not real up to date on this, but I think we are able to get a quantity of the WunderWeapons too. i.e. we have like 120 F22s. That seems like a lot of airplanes to me, especially if you add in all the F16s etc we still have, that are probably about 1:1 to the MiG29s.

What isn't mentioned in the fiasco of the F35 is we're unlikely to use them, heck we barely use the F22s. We're likely to use Drones at this point, and we have a LOT of those too, and they're much cheaper than an F35 is.

I really think it's just a GOP form of welfare.(I was going to say conservative, but I don't know that the GOP is really Conservative anymore).

Comment: Re:So if your network is also from 1997 (Score 1) 171

by jp10558 (#49497015) Attached to: Windows Remains Vulnerable To Serious 18-Year-Old SMB Security Flaw

Oh, I'm not forcing anyone into a Windows environment. I strongly push them towards Linux and tell them it's the preferred environment at the lab, and all our infrastructure is Linux based. We just wanted to set up a data download station, and suggested Linux, but were told the external users aren't familar with Linux (I don't know how they run the experiment, where lots of it is based on Linux, but hey, not something I get to change), and will need Windows there.

We have plenty of Labview stuff which I'm told by staff must use Windows, as well as some Matlab stuff, even though I'm pretty sure quite a lot of it runs on Linux, I don't get to override them.

And then there are the Mac users who insisted on using onenote for logging on a separate Windows computer, when their experiment controls were all Linux and their laptops are Macs, but why not use a Windows only program for this note-taking? Because it's easier than a web based logging tool to copy pictures into. (This was 2008ish, carries forward to now, though there now is a Mac OneNote client, it's still not to my knowledge multi user or runable on Linux)...

Most of the insanity comes from people who *don't care* about the technical reality and substitute their own. And are apparently OK with a lot of cluged together solutions. At least I get a job out of it.

Comment: Re:So if your network is also from 1997 (Score 1) 171

by jp10558 (#49492025) Attached to: Windows Remains Vulnerable To Serious 18-Year-Old SMB Security Flaw

Well, there's the experimental data, and then the administrative data. Those word docs need to be shared, backed up, etc. The various matlab and labview files need to be accessible from Sun Grid Engine nodes and local Windows, Scientific Linux and Mac OSX workstations.

We currently use a RedHat HA cluster that provides NFS and CIFS / SMB access to disk stored on iSCSI devices. So sort of a home build SAN I guess. We looked into better known commercial offerings, but basically they were 10x our budget. Unlikely to happen. One of the "Wins" we got was budgeting to buy actual 1U servers with IPMI and the like. Even build your own costs a good chunk of IT budget for 5 years.

Scientists and Professors are a bit unreasonable I guess - they want high performance, reliability, and all that without having to spend a lot of money or change their workflow at all. They also flat out don't read documentation about stuff that's unimportant to their research, and to them, computers should be like mains power - it's unimportant how it works, and it should magically "do the right thing"...

If they have to know more than "plug it in", there's likely to be trouble. IT certainly can't ask any user to ... stop being a user because they don't know what a network share is, or what a computer power button is. They user is a world class scientist here to do important research - they don't have time for "unnecessarily complicated" systems. Sadly, this is of course why we have jobs. But it does generally keep us to the lowest common denominator for software and solutions.

Comment: Re:So if your network is also from 1997 (Score 1) 171

by jp10558 (#49481747) Attached to: Windows Remains Vulnerable To Serious 18-Year-Old SMB Security Flaw

Honestly, I'm not sure if you're a troll, or just someone who strongly believes if you don't do it your way, you're wrong.

I'm working in a research institution. We have limited funding from grants. We are doing X-Ray research, with detectors that output data on the order of 30GB a run, and there can be more than one run a day. This data, once generated, needs to be accessible by compute nodes, without hitting the acquisition disk. There isn't reliable down time between acquisitions, so rsyncs are hard to schedule. We also need to schedule backups, which is easier on central storage, as these acquisition machines move around, and aren't always up.

Laptops have trouble carrying around 30TB for analysis, and desktops aren't cost effective with that storage load. I could also go into the issue with data walking out the door, which may be prohibited, or desired depending on the situation.

On top of binary research data, there's all the program source, program binaries, infrastructure data, standard office documents etc.

I'm not sure about a content management system - we have a Wiki which is great, and SVN which is great, and Vault for Inventor source control, which is also great. For office documents, the closest thing I'm aware of is Sharepoint, which doesn't seem like anything I want to touch with a 10 ft pole. What else should I be looking at?

And how does it work for users who barely understand "save to this network folder"?

Comment: Re:So if your network is also from 1997 (Score 1) 171

by jp10558 (#49477715) Attached to: Windows Remains Vulnerable To Serious 18-Year-Old SMB Security Flaw

I'd love to know the better solution for Mac, Windows and Linux access to network shares, and the network shares have to be performant, local (i.e no cloud sync), not require paid software, and support several tens of terabytes per shared filesystem. Oh, and use Active Directory permissions...

The degree of technical confidence is inversely proportional to the level of management.

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