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Comment: Re:Hasn't this been proven to be junk science? (Score 2) 313

by joh (#49489553) Attached to: A 2-Year-Old Has Become the Youngest Person Ever To Be Cryonically Frozen

Hope, and judging that rotting over weeks or rotting over decades in the worst case will mean they will end up the same way, just slower.

The next step will be (probably destructive) high-resolution scanning of the physical brain structure and then saving the scan data in the hope that one day we will be able to "decode" that data and "run" the brain on some other hardware by emulating it's biology. At least that data will keep fresh much, much longer (potentially). Baby steps to immortality. There's nothing wrong with trying.

Effective immortality will be the most lucrative product ever. Sooner or later we will grow some of us into ghosts and maybe even gods. And they probably will be the same ill-tempered, asshole-gods as all of them are. Well, or not. At least we should try.

Do you really want to die in the same body you were born in? Like a fucking animal?

Comment: Re:A few positive points about Apple's watch .... (Score 1) 290

by joh (#49465215) Attached to: Report: Apple Watch Preorders Almost 1 Million On First Day In the US

I don't get it. Really. I mean, people spend $400 on lots of things that aren't really necessary, just because they like them. Have you ever build a house? Or bought a car? Or clothing? Shoes? You like things, you can afford them, you buy them. If it makes you happy to have things you like, what's so bad about that?

And this isn't just about about rich people. One could even say that living (as opposed to surviving) starts when you can afford more than you need. I really don't want to limit me to what I really NEED. Buying pretty and convenient things and by this allowing others to make pretty and convenient things is what keeps things going and this probably started with the first stone hand-axe someone swapped against a slice (or two) of meat, so he could eat without having to hunt while the hunter got a stone-axe without having to know (and learn) how to make it. EVERYTHING that differentiates us from living like animals came from that.

So if you think that watch is crap, make a better one or shut up. Or invest you energy into hating (which won't change anything but your mood and probably not in a good way).

Comment: Re:Ugly ugly ugly (Score 1) 290

by joh (#49464909) Attached to: Report: Apple Watch Preorders Almost 1 Million On First Day In the US

To be honest I thought the very same about the iPhone 6 but when I handled one and looked at it in the flesh I changed my mind. It's actually quite pretty in a simple and subtle way. And that watch is VERY similar to the iPhone 6. It's smoothly rounded, with very little in terms of gaps and ugly details and I'm fairly sure it will look and feel totally fine.

I won't buy one, but I don't really think it is ugly. Of course it's still a matter of taste, but there are things you can call "ugly" with better reasons.

Comment: Re:Dumb question (Score 1) 290

by joh (#49464669) Attached to: Report: Apple Watch Preorders Almost 1 Million On First Day In the US

Yes, you can.

Anyway, I don't need such a watch and I won't buy one (now) but I have little doubt that it is a nice and somewhat useful and pretty toy.

Recently I have taken to cautiously using Siri for simple things (like setting a timer when cooking some noodles or whatever) and yes, not having to fumble with my phone feels good. Having Siri (and other things for simple tasks) on my wrist surely would be convenient. Not groundbreaking as such, but just one step in the very same direction that we once set out towards by using a piece of rock to do things instead of using our teeth. Everything after that was lots of little steps.

I don't get the hate, really. People don't "need" most of the stuff they buy. Doesn't mean it isn't comfortable or nice to have though. Hey, drinking nothing but water is totally enough!

Comment: Race to the bottom... (Score 5, Insightful) 269

by joh (#49334919) Attached to: Developers and the Fear of Apple

The 'race to the bottom' is just utterly normal for any market with lots of competition. The only way to escape then is setting yourself apart enough to command higher prices instead of trying to undercut the cheapest offers and this in itself is a highly competitive field (as in: works only for a few apps, not for all).

Face it, apps are like cups of coffee: Either you sell just coffee and people will buy the cheapest one or you manage to add some (real or subjective) value to your cups of coffee so you can sell with better margins.

But yes, it's almost impossible to make a living from $0.99 apps.

Comment: Re:What's the money for? (Score 1) 90

by joh (#48469211) Attached to: WaveNET – the Floating, Flexible Wave Energy Generator

Excuse me, but this is like your employer asking you why you want more pay for your work than necessary to keep you from starving until the next workday... I mean, maybe he doesn't WANT to pay you more than that but you DO want as much as you can get.

Slashdot is a business, not a public service.

Comment: Delays? (Score 1) 46

by joh (#48445173) Attached to: Spaceport America Loses $1.7 Million Due To Virgin Galactic Delays

Not unheard of in such things, really. If you're not prepared to push through some bad times, forget about it. Either push on or leave it. I still think VG is hardly more than a stunt for the rich (and a dangerous one too) but you're not going to dunk even your toes into space without running into problems now and then, often producing lots of debris... and costs.

Comment: Entropy always goes downhill (Score 2) 550

God. OK. While I agree with you in many things, there are a few things that you seem to have missed:

1. Debian (or general-purpose Linux generally) isn't simple anymore. These days are over and there's no way to get them back. Really. This is true for EVERYTHING in Debian/Linux and in every other OS. General-purpose systems tend to become more complex to be more easy on the outside. And there's no way around that.

2. The "community". I don't even know where to start. The "community" has turned into a mob that knows everything and gets nothing done. I'm sick of that. Strong opinions about things with no alternative implementations are worth exactly nothing.

3. Sit down and develop something better and defend it.

4. There is no step 4.

Meanwhile I really fear that several community-based projects will happily fail just because there are legions of people who know perfectly what they hate and have no precise idea what they want to have or even would sit down and DO IT. Do I like SystemD? No, it sucks, just like every other comparable system. Do you know what I hate even more? Not having ANYTHING to work with and to rely on it staying around.

Debian (and Wikipedia by the way too) is becoming a bit like a failed state: Factions that love fighting more than building something and kill each other while there's hardly anything left than smoking ruins around them. If there's someone doing something that you don't like and won't listen to you than either just sit down and do something better or shut the fuck up.

Debian is becoming a lesson in applied entropy.

Comment: Re:Citizen Four (Score 1) 231

by joh (#48352545) Attached to: Berlin's Digital Exiles: Where Tech Activists Go To Escape the NSA

I think there's no way to go forward with technology and not have that (being monitored one way or another). The REAL test is if we can still manage to have rights and use them regardless of being monitored or not. All too often all this surveillance panic is used by people as an excuse for being cowards. The real test of you being a freedom-loving individual is not if you're against or pro surveillance. The real test is if you dare to be yourself DESPITE it. Because if all of us just act as free individuals all surveillance in the world isn't going to make us less free. But if we give in to that kind of terror we won't be free.

In short: Do not ever wait to be not monitored before you act freely. Because you can't prove a negative anyway. Freedom is nothing that ever will be handed out to you.

To Berlin: East Berlin (and all of the GDR) was the most perfect surveillance state that ever existed. Still, when the people stood up and wouldn't take it anymore, it collapsed. What good is knowing everything to a government if "everything" just amounts to "they are fed up with us and won't take it anymore"? I think many people underestimate what Germans did in 1989: They got rid not only of a government, but of a government that had all the powers in its hands. There's a lesson to be learned from that. The people are more powerful than the state.

Comment: Re:Silly question -- but... (Score 4, Insightful) 54

by joh (#48347325) Attached to: New Facebook Update Lets You Choose News Feed Content

Why the flying fuck would I need another site to feed me news?

Facebook is the website to end all websites.

People seem to use Facebook as a kind of mental chewing gum. There's always some gossip and "news" to scroll through. Sometimes you're interested in something of it. An endless on-the-go stream of gossip.

Comment: Re:How about... (Score 1) 54

by joh (#48347275) Attached to: New Facebook Update Lets You Choose News Feed Content

No, they should just show you relentless everything you get. If it's too much, go and restrict it.

What FB does is not showing you everything and additionally show you things you never wanted to see just because someone paid them for it.

But of course FB is a business, not a service. It's more like a personal TV channel than anything else. You get fed enough of what you want just enough to make you see what others want you to see.

You can't take damsel here now.

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