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Comment: Re:Because (Score 4, Insightful) 325

by jlowery (#46640755) Attached to: FWD.us Wants More H-1B Visas, But 50% Go To Offshore Firms

"I'm not fox news but you can believe me. If you work hard and create value, you can make a lot of money"

Scientists work hard and create a lot of value and generally do not make a lot of money.

Many good teachers work hard and create a lot of value, but do not make a lot of money.

Many engineers work hard and create a lot of value, but do not make a lot of money.

Many paramedics work hard and create a lot of value, but do not make a lot of money

Many truck drivers work hard and create a lot of value, but do not make a lot of money

Many people who put family ahead of working hard create value and do not make a lot of money.

If you think a person's value to society is directly tied to the amount of money they make, then you need to go soak your head.

Comment: Re:Matter of environment (Score 1) 246

by jlowery (#45705623) Attached to: The Business of Attention Deficit Disorder

This. Is this a 'disorder' of the individual or of the society? I think it's the later. Schools seem to be the indoctrination center for factory/office work, where sitting in one place for long periods and focusing on one task is economically beneficial (more so to the corporation than the person). But we're not all built like that. Some of us are explorers, some synthesizers of ideas, some creative and constructive. Yet we're all expected to behave like office drones when in school. And many of us go on to careers that we are conditioned for, not what we have an aptitude for.

Comment: My 'outside the box' list (Score 1) 598

by jlowery (#45070465) Attached to: What Are the Genuinely Useful Ideas In Programming?

Useful skills related to programming, but not programming technology:

1) how to take a complex problem and break it down into simpler problems

2) how to reduce risk by slipstreaming accumulated small changes into a production changes (see 1, above)

3) build client trust by implementing the low-hanging fruit, first.

4) make yourself redundant through documentation and mentoring. It may not seem in your best interest, but it's the professional thing to do, and prods you to move on to other things.

5) Choose the right tools for the job

6) (Corollary to 5): If you're programming in XML, you're doing it wrong.

7) take time to think about a problem. If you think you have a solution, sit on your hands!: don't code until you've examined the drawbacks.

"The Amiga is the only personal computer where you can run a multitasking operating system and get realtime performance, out of the box." -- Peter da Silva

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