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Comment: Re:Visible controllers (Score 1) 105 105

this is why keyboards like textblade, with touch sensitive keys that actually don't send an input signal until you push down will be important for vr.

with that kind of keyboard, you can have a u.i. representation of the keyboard (e.g. like if you look down) and you can tell where your fingers are by glows that correspond to what keys you're touching... but the touch doesn't mean that you are entering any text yet. it's just to orient yourself on the keyboard. then you push down on the key as normal and send commands or whatever.

Comment: i hate multi-user environments too... (Score 1) 284 284

and i hate hate hate that because of it, when a program installs, it has to send cruft all over the freaking drive instead of, in a nice and orderly fashion, just pack all of itself into one self contained folder. i would literally fall to my knees and fellate myself if i never ever had to wonder where a config or settings file was stored ever again.

especially these days, computing is cheap. i daresay that those who have to share the computer with a household is outnumbered by those for whom the computer is genuinely PERSONAL.

and other reasons for putting .dll and files everywhere, like to save disk space by sharing resources... gah - disk drive storage is ludicrously cheap.

howabout we chew through some resources so that we can have a sane, intuitive computing environment?

Comment: digital can still be SLOWER (Score 1) 261 261

it seems like for most people, digital reading is fine when it's just "straight ahead" fiction reading. you're approaching the material linearly and with the exception of a couple of flip backs every now and again, you're just going from start to finish one page at a time. i read almost all my novels like this.

it's really different if you're reading a textbook or manual where you might have to access information in a wide variety of places at any moment. in such cases, books tend to be better and faster because you can go immediately to any page that you've dog eared or even by pure muscle memory remember about where it is relative to the thickness of the book. and page flips are instant. try flipping 25 pages with a book looking for information and then doing the same on a kindle. screen refresh on e-paper is still VASTLY inferior to a moist thumb. even in this day, there's all kinds of inexplicable delays in just going to page 124 on digital vs on paper. paper really is superior for instantly going to any page and the interface for doing that is faaaaaaaar better with paper.

there are ways to get close to this speed on a pc or a laptop but only by really changing up the paradigm of how one searches a book for information - i.e. not flipping pages looking but explicitly using the search function. and in any case where you would be looking through the glossary, digital would be better and faster.

not to mention that taking notes on the book pages itself is better and faster in analog. lots of apps where you CAN do this... but none of them are as fast as hiliter and pen in hand.

for learning things like programming, or a graphics program or even the dungeon master's guide, if i could choose only one medium, i prefer paper books with pens and sticky notes and hiliters. ideally though, i'd have both.

Comment: i would love it if it were true (Score 1) 212 212

i really wish reading and writing code were like literacy.

i've been circling coding for a looooong time and i can do some scripting in maya mel but even there, it's on the order of copying and pasting and writing some connective tissue to make things work.

the problem that i've found is that it's not like literacy where you pick a language and you learn the syntax. that would be GREAT if that were true. but in modern programming, it's also like you have to start learning neurology, biology and psychology at the same time. there is just a tremendous amount of infrastructure whether it's libraries, APIs or different OSs and there's a whole host of just simple questions that would illuminate the "lay of the land" that remain mysteries to me.

it feels like it's something that would have been within grasp back in the c64 days but nowadays, it feels like there's simply too many layers.

perhaps i can get good enough to write programs that input and output to the console....

Comment: Re:Not so fast, Thermodynamic laws are pesky thing (Score 1) 174 174

why is waste heat "garbage"?

are you denying that there is such a thing? that we are currently actively cooling parts and attaching heat sinks and radiators for merely decorative purposes?

and if waste heat is an actual phenomenon... why NOT harvest energy from it? complexity is low with no moving parts. price is currently high but as with most things, that can come down with research.

so waste heat exists. power can be harvested.

i don't see what the point of your tirade is.

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