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Comment: Re:The WHAT industry? (Score 1) 143

by jesseck (#47370609) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Replacing Paper With Tablets For Design Meetings?
They design your healthcare - treatment plans, hospital stay, standard fees, all that. This way, when hospitals replace patient care with "efficiency", the execs can at least look at their pocketbooks and be satisfied. I know a few healthcare workers that see patient care going to shit while their metrics get more demanding. Anyways, people will pay for efficiency and a design team that uses tablets is more effective than one with paper (and greener!) - so in the end it makes sense: If you want efficient healthcare, go with the ones who use tablets.

Comment: Single-Issue Candidates (Score 1) 308

by jesseck (#47298619) Attached to: Interviews: Ask Lawrence Lessig About His Mayday PAC
You seek to elect candidates focused on a single issue, however our Congress hears and votes on multiple issues during an election cycle. While campaign finance reform is your goal, wouldn't your contributors / potential contributors be more concerned about other issues that affect our country as well? Campaign finance reform may be important, but rarely would it trump individual moral / political beliefs.

Comment: Re:Block their cookies (Score 2) 140

By throwing a temper tantrum until you cave and leave the cookies on the floor? At that point, you didn't give the toddler the cookies... you just placed them where the toddler would be pacified. The toddler is the one who abused your "trust".

That sounds a lot like politics... "I sponsored this bill, but I didn't realize it would be used for this."

Comment: Re:Oxymoron (Score 3, Insightful) 231

by jesseck (#46852379) Attached to: White House Worried About Discrimination Through Analytics

Disparate impact... it's going to be with us for a while. Might as well get used to it. Black people are generally less intelligent than others and it's our fault.

While you state that black people are generally less intelligent then others, I think these politicians thoughts are a big drive towards that... they are in effect stating that poor neighborhoods are incapable of reporting their own pothole problems. In the end, the "Street Bump" app is another avenue of personal responsibility - people took the initiative to improve their driving route, installed an app to report problems, and ran that app to ensure the problems were reported. In poorer neighborhoods, people are not taking the personal responsibility to report the problems. They can call in to report problems, and by reporting those in sufficient numbers (similar to the app) Boston's street maintenance crews could be alerted. They don't, though, because they have been conditioned over generations to believe they don't matter and it requires someone else to fix their "problems".

In the end, the politicians are stating the poor people / black people / whatever group of people are incapable of taking responsibility (unlike those wealthy people), so the Government must hold their hand and make things easier for them. Yes, it will be with us for a while, and short of a major event nothing will change it.

Comment: Re:Fantastic Google Chrome marketing (Score 1) 204

by jesseck (#46755839) Attached to: Mozilla Appoints Former Marketing Head Interim CEO

In regards to his personal and political beliefs, those should not (but probably will) have a bearing on how he leads a company. We don't need a bunch of crowd-pleasing politicians, saying whatever people want to hear, to lead. Mozilla has just shown itself as willing to cave to any demand, and demonstrated its inability to support its employees. Similar to Benghazi (different subject, same concept) - the US Government, regardless who is "at fault", stood by while an Ambassador and CIA Operators were killed without assisting in a meaningful way. So, too, has Mozilla stood by while an employee became a casualty of their personal beliefs. There will be a next time that someone else at Mozilla (or a similar company) is expected to "take one for the team" because of their personal beliefs.

In regards to his choice and consequences, yes, I agree. We can say whatever we want, but there are consequences to every action.

Comment: Re:Fantastic Google Chrome marketing (Score 4, Interesting) 204

by jesseck (#46752227) Attached to: Mozilla Appoints Former Marketing Head Interim CEO

But what about the LGBT employees there? The CEO was just one of the employees (and now he's gone) so the only people you're hurting are the other Mozilla employees, why are you so against them?

Because it is fun to bully a company into releasing their CEO. Damn three-letter executives make too much anyways - let's bully their income away with higher taxes for the rich. When we're "sick of bully's and hypocrites", we need to look into the mirror - the shit goes both ways.

This intolerant "tolerance" policy pisses me off... have an opinion and don't be a coward to state it. I have respect for a person who states and stands by their beliefs (regardless of what they are), and doesn't change them because someone else doesn't agree. Just recognize bullying for what it is- I hate hypocrites who are tired of bullying and decide they need to start doing the same.

Comment: Bad pictures (Score 3, Insightful) 102

by jesseck (#46495981) Attached to: Transformer-Style Scooter Lets You Ride Your Briefcase To Work
If they have a product, they should use actual images of those. Their homepage has fake pictures, done poorly. The man boarding a train? Probably not their market, and his reflection in the train clearly shows no "transformer" scooter. The lady in the airport? Looks like an out-of-place runway model, with unnaturally straight features. Man by the bus, he also has some unnatural characteristics. I understand using props for marketing, or prototypes. To do "press releases " with poor photos is bad form. Then again, I'm not sure who will use this product either, and if it exists beyond a designer's computer.

Comment: Re:Sensitive information? (Score 2, Funny) 152

As for the other info, I fail to see how my wedding date, educational history, etc. would be particularly useful to a killer.

It depends on how devious the killer is... they may use the home address to kill your dog, kill your spouse on your anniversary, and then off you at a class reunion.

Assembly language experience is [important] for the maturity and understanding of how computers work that it provides. -- D. Gries

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