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Comment: Play framework is the way... (Score 2, Interesting) 253

by jbwiv (#31892582) Attached to: Thoughts On the State of Web Development
Rails? Been there. Grails? Done that. Both are decent. Rails is very good, but the abuse of open classes gets old quickly. Grails is ok, but it's really just a thin veneer over a complex mix of Java projects, and God help you if you run into any problems, because you'll be dealing with a stack trace that's 1000s of lines long, and you be troubleshooting these underlying complex java libs. For me, the play framework (http://www.playframework.org) is the best Rails-like approach on a Java platform. It stays very close to rails, so if you know rails learning it is easy. It's very pragmatic and very fast. It doesn't require a compile step to see your changes. It just works. Best of all, the code is clean and easy to troubleshoot. I suggest you check it out.

Comment: Re:Err... (Score 3, Insightful) 279

by jbwiv (#30707166) Attached to: Why Oracle Can't Easily Kill PostgreSQL
Um....there's over 70 committers to PostgreSQL. And even the top 20 work for a wide range of companies. Buying them out would be virtually impossible. PostgreSQL is an open source database done right, both technically and politically. You MySQL apologists simply refuse to acknowledge that you hitched your wagon to the wrong horse, even when your horse may be put down soon.
Government

+ - Govt. liability when providing online services?

Submitted by jbwiv
jbwiv (266761) writes "Today, I went to my state's sex offender database to perform a search (http://sexoffender.ncdoj.gov). Surprisingly, when I searched my home address, the map was completely empty, although I know for a fact that there are registered offenders within a few blocks. I quickly zoomed out and realized the map was completely empty. Obviously, a problem with their service.

So I called the NC Dept of Justice and eventually made it through to a person who helped me trouble shoot the problem. Everything was showing up fine for her, but even after a browser restart, nothing on my end. Suddenly, I got that all too familiar feeling...one I haven't felt in a long time. I fired up a Windows VM, and sure enough, everything works fine there. Strangely enough, it's not an IE versus Firefox thing...it even works well in Firefox, but ONLY on Windows.

This is a big deal for me. My entire household is Linux-based. My wife uses Ubuntu to do her daily computer chores and, though really not a techie, she gets along quite well. What if an offender had moved in across the street, and we didn't know because we don't run Windows? Shouldn't a state government use a technology that insures compatibility across ALL major platforms? Could the state be legally liable in cases like these? And regardless of liability, how can I force them to change?"

If at first you don't succeed, you must be a programmer.

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