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Comment Re:Muslims will find this offensive... (Score 1) 617

1 - Like you just admitted, you won't get murdered for telling some unpleasant truth about a Christian religion in a Christian country. 2 - That's not even the issue. The issue is that you can get murdered for telling some unpleasant truth about Islam in a Christian country.

You are really not getting the point here.

Comment Re:Muslims will find this offensive... (Score 2) 617

The average Muslim takes their religions as seriously as the average Christian these days.

That's actually wrong. Factually wrong, although it's an argument that being repeated all around against all data. As you can see, the "average" Muslim believes in capital punishment for Apostasy (leaving the faith of Islam) and more than the average believes that stoning to the death should be the penalty for adultery.

The data comes from the PEW research centre, not some nut-job right-wing organisation. Should also be noted that the extremist Muslim majority countries couldn't be analysed, so the real situation is even worst: http://www.pewforum.org/2013/0...

Comment Re:Muslims will find this offensive... (Score 1) 617

Yes, Christians might be offended, but: 1-You won't apply self censorship like you do about something that offends Islam. 2-You don't have a real possibility of being murdered (in the 1st world at least) just because you refuse to apply that self censorship about Catholicism (unlike with Islam).

Comment Re:Finally! (Score 1) 221

Same reason we ditched Assembler somewhere in the past. Languages need to evolve, we can't be stuck with C and it's design limitations forever. C served us well, just like Assembly had done, but as compilers evolve we can proceed to higher level languages paying a very little penalty in execution time and in control.

Comment Re:Do damage to Bitcoin's reputation??? (Score 1) 185

So, you are telling me that the value of the Venezuelan Bolivar I should use for reference is the one that the street traders in some lost city of Colombia (Cúcuta) are willing to pay for it?

Well, in that case the price of Bitcoin dropped almost to zero since if I go around in the street (and well, I live in city bigger than Cúcuta by almost 1 order of magnitude) where I live and ask people to trade/accept bitcoin for payment, nobody accepts that (even the bitcoin vending machine we had is gone now).

I mean, we should compare apples to apples and oranges to oranges, right?

Comment Re:Do damage to Bitcoin's reputation??? (Score 1) 185

The US Currency scams don't cause the value of US currency to swing wildly.

The US currency is backed up by the USA government. Bitcoin is backed up by an algorithm that crunches numbers and serves absolutely no other purpose. As soon as people realize there is no point in keeping a computer crunching numbers with no practical purpose (highly likely if the price of bitcoin continues to crash), Bitcoin looses it's value. US Currency can only loose it's value when people see no point and using it to pay the USA government their taxes or any other contribution, even if they decide to stop using it for any other transaction (which is highly unlikely given the power of the US government in the national and worldwide economy).

Comment Re:Do damage to Bitcoin's reputation??? (Score 1) 185

Which can only be true if Bitcoin serves its intended purpose as a useful store of value

Not really. It just has to be a perceived a speculative asset in order to use it as a scam. A classical example is the usage of Tulip futures as an highly speculative asset during a small period of the XVII century in Holland. Clearly the tulips where certainly not an useful store of value, and yet, due to the high speculation about it's price, it became a heaven for scammers to use it, leading to a major crash that affected the Dutch economy.

Comment Re:My Plans for Firefox (Score 1) 208

Damn, I thought that was just me.

Yes, I know the feeling, when we encounter such a major bug our reaction is: "this must obviously by a problem with my personal setup, there's no way the devs would let such a major flaw unsolved". But well, it's not. This is Firefox and the devs just put the bug aside, don't address it exists, and go on adding video chat and some new icons in the tab bar.

"Bond reflected that good Americans were fine people and that most of them seemed to come from Texas." - Ian Fleming, "Casino Royale"

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