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Comment: What's the problem? (Score 1) 307

by jbrown.za (#48875885) Attached to: Blackberry CEO: Net Neutrality Means Mandating Cross-Platform Apps

Android apps can be ported to QNX, so why aren't app developers doing that? Oh yeah, I forgot, no one uses QNX devices ... and no one wants to develop J2ME apps for BBOS either.

Maybe Mr Chen should be more focused on developing his ecosystem. Incentivize developers to port their apps and help partners create apps that offer the equivalent of the most popular apps in the other app stores.

Comment: Here's a clue (Score 3, Insightful) 281

by jbrown.za (#48600289) Attached to: Eric Schmidt: To Avoid NSA Spying, Keep Your Data In Google's Services

From the original article:

Back doors are a bad idea, Schmidt said. “It’d be great, if you’re the government, to have a trap door, but how do we at Google know that the other governments are not taking over the trap door from you?” he said.

He is not saying the government (presumably the US government) shouldn't have a backdoor. He is only expressing a concern that other governments might find ways to exploit it.

Bottom line ... it still seems like Google will hand over any data the US government wants.

Comment: Great problem to have (Score 1) 279

It always makes me feel depressed when reading posts like this. I live in South Africa. The quality of service we get from our fixed line provider means that I rarely get more than 384 Kbps on a 2 Mbps DSL connection. The fact that you need a way to make your home network about 3000 times faster instead of just 1800 times faster than my connection makes me want to cry. What makes it worse is that I pay about $50 USD a month for the "service".

Comment: Re:What a great man (Score 1) 311

by jbrown.za (#45618253) Attached to: Nelson Mandela Dead At 95

What you need to remember is that at the time the Soviet Union was very active in Africa, with particularly close relations with Angola. South Africa was a counter point to this ... The enemy of my enemy is my friend. South Africa also had vast mineral resources. It was producing about half the worlds gold along with many other minerals such as platinum, vanadium, manganese and uranium. It is also very well situated strategically.

Comment: Protect the rights of others (Score 2) 306

by jbrown.za (#45618139) Attached to: Obama Praises NSA But Promises To Rein It In

By accepting that the NSA is allowed to spy on anyone who is not American, without any limitations, the American people have let the genie out the bottle. This allows the NSA to gain access and capabilities that are then turned inwards to spy on Americans as well.

“Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves.” - Abraham Lincoln

Comment: Put the shoe on the other foot (Score 2) 260

by jbrown.za (#44947165) Attached to: President of Brazil Lashes Out At NSA Espionage Programs In Speech To UN

When looking at contracts, in many cases a good test of fairness is to swap the names on the contracts and see if both parties are still happy. I think this test would work well here as well:

United States president, Barack Obama, has launched a blistering attack on Brazilian espionage at the UN general assembly, accusing the ABIN of violating international law by its indiscriminate collection of personal information of US citizens and economic espionage targeted on the country's strategic industries.

Sounds pretty reasonable to me

Comment: The system was broken to start with (Score 1) 286

by jbrown.za (#44922463) Attached to: Letter to "Extended Family" Assures That NSA Will "Weather This Storm"
What amazes me is that the "line" has been communication between US citizens should be untouched, but anything involving foreigners is fair game. Placing the rights of Americans above the rights of everyone else has created the gap. If you have a system that protects everyone’s privacy. Where any access to information or monitoring must be substantiated and require a warrant or something similar, the system is far less open to abuse. Freedom is lost one piece at a time. The failure to stand up for the rights of others means that you are one step closer to giving up your own. “Give to every other human being every right that you claim for yourself - that is my doctrine.” Thomas Paine

Comment: ... and in other news (Score 2) 95

by jbrown.za (#44900613) Attached to: Internet of Things Demands New Social Contract To Protect Privacy
And to demonstrate European commitment to privacy, the plane of Bolivian President Evo Morales was refused permission to fly through the airspace of Spain, France, Portugal and Italy. The plane was later grounded for 13 hours and searched by Austrian police in Vienna. All in pursuit of that terrorist Edward Snowden. Clearly these were the first steps towards "the creation of a whole new social contract to enshrine the right to privacy and prevent the creation of technology-fueled Orwellian surveillance states in which individual privacy protections take a back seat to security and control."

"Well, if you can't believe what you read in a comic book, what *can* you believe?!" -- Bullwinkle J. Moose

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