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Comment: This doesn't compute...or does it (Score 4, Interesting) 112

by jbmartin6 (#47750867) Attached to: Is Dong Nguyen Trolling Gamers With "Swing Copters"?
At first I thought, "years of hard work"? How can this be when clones fill up the store in a matter of days? Doesn't seem like it is that much work. Then I thought, well perhaps designer spends years designing a game with all sorts of clever ideas then copiers use them all a few days after release. I have to ask, though, is this what happens? Surely a game must spend some time before becoming popular enough to copy, during which it builds a following and has first mover advantage. Copiers can't copy those advantages. It seems like it is still worth doing to many since folks are still making games for these platforms.

Comment: Re:If he sold phyiscal copies (Score 1) 462

by jbmartin6 (#47731653) Attached to: 33 Months In Prison For Recording a Movie In a Theater
Yes, that is my point. The current business model is not the only one. Who knows, maybe they would finance the things with different merchandising deals. No single person is capable of knowing everything that is or isn't possible. How much of the cost goes into the actors salaries? I don't know, but I'll bet there is a whole lot of wiggle room there.

Comment: Re:If he sold phyiscal copies (Score 1) 462

by jbmartin6 (#47729811) Attached to: 33 Months In Prison For Recording a Movie In a Theater

removing all copy protection would require movies as we currently know them to cease to exist

"as we currently know them" is the key phrase here. No one in the current production chain has any right to keep their job at everyone else's expense, any more than blacksmiths and farriers did. Now, would movies, good and bad, still get made if copying was perfectly legal? Yes, although the field would no doubt be very different than what we currently know.

Prototype designs always work. -- Don Vonada

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