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Feed Techdirt: Guy Who Won Original Right To Be Forgotten Case Loses His Attempt To Have New Story About His Past Forgotten (

The whole right to be forgotten thing over in Europe continues to get more and more bizarre. Not too long ago, we wrote about one Thomas Goolnik, who had succeeded in getting an old NY Times story about him "delinked" from his name in Europe. The NY Times then wrote about that delinking, and we wrote about the NY Times article. Mr. Goolnik then succeeded in having our article about his successful right to be forgotten attempt also forgotten by Google. So we wrote about that too. And, once again, Goolnik succeeded in having that story forgotten. As of yet, it appears our final story on Goolnik has remained accessible on European searches for Goolnik's name, but we have no idea if it's because Google has realized that it should remain up or if Goolnik just hasn't made a request.

Meanwhile, it appears that the guy who first convinced the European Court of Justice to enforce this right to be forgotten, Mario Costeja Gonzalez, may have run into a similar situation. As you probably remember, Costeja brought the original case that argued that Google should no longer show results on searches for his name that linked to some stories in the late 90s about his being forced to sell some land to cover debts. The Court eventually decided that since this information was no longer "relevant," that under the data protection directive, it should be "delinked" in Google's database as a "privacy" measure.

Of course, as many people pointed out, in bringing that very case, the details of Costeja's financial transactions suddenly became relevant again. And, apparently that resulted in more people commenting on Costeja, including an article entitled "The unforgettable story of the seizure to the defaulter Mario Costeja Gonzalez that happened in 1998." And, as you might imagine, he wasn't too happy about some of the comments, and with this newfound power that he helped create in hand, he demanded that Google also take down links to such comments (most likely including that article linked in this paragraph).

And here's where it gets fun: Google refused. And so Costeja went to the Spanish Data Protection Authority to complain... and the Spanish DPA rejected his claim, noting that this information is now relevant in part because Costeja himself made it relevant again.

Now the DPA finds that there is indeed a preponderant interest of the public in the comments about the famous case that gave rise to the CJEU judgment of May 13, 2014 – and expressly reminds that the claimant itself went public about the details.
So, yes, the right to be forgotten has now made the story that was "successfully" forgotten originally so newsworthy that it may no longer be forgotten, and in fact is much more widely known. I think we've heard of some term for that before...

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Comment Re:Over what time interval? (Score 1) 528

I know this is the internet, but wow. You could have just told you disagreed but instead you went the "I'll be an absolute fucking asshole to a stranger because he posted a fact I deem incorrect."

Either your mother messed you up bad or you were massively bullied in school and are still hung up on that and now take it out on some guy in a comment section. Either way, I'd say you should consider talking to someone about it.

Comment Re:Not a surprise, but is it just one ingredient? (Score 1) 422

Carbonation is an acid. The effect on teeth is three-fold. The sugar is bad (Feeds the bacteria). The acid level rise damages teeth directly. The acid level rise is beneficial for the bacteria. The bacteria raise the acid level, and the acid ends up eating the enamel.

Incorrect. COLA is acidic. CO2 in your bloodstream may cause a respiratory or metabolic alkalosis but not from drinking club soda. COLA affects teeth. COLA may contribute to bacterial overgrowth.

Seltzer does none of those things.

Comment Could actually be good (Score 2) 137

This *could* actually be good if they treat it like the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie. That movie simply made a Good Pirate film, not really tying it to the ride at all (that being said I recently went to Disney World and it's interesting that they've retcon'd the ride into being all about the Depp films).

I can easily see them making an Indiana Jones-type sci-fi film where there is one small scene involving an alien puzzle that sort-of resembles a Tetris puzzle. The protagonist lines up some block line in Tetris, a door opens and the movie continues. 30 seconds of reference to the game while otherwise being an independent sci-fi film.

Also, that's why I had high hopes for Battleship. It had a competent director and all he had to do was use a decent Navy/boat script - that's all. They weren't confined to any sort of plot at all. Too bad they messed it up (and, to be fair, I have to admit that the climactic scene with the anchor/flipping the boat around was pretty neat).

Comment Re:Periscopes (Score 1) 470

Why has hollywood butchered the reality periscopes in submarines? Answer that and you will have the answer to space battles depiction.

Interesting comment. Please explain to this non-Navy/submarine-ignoramus here...

Comment Re:good (Score 4, Interesting) 364

This is what happened.

When Friends and Big Bang cast members decide to unite for higher paychecks, the executives cave. A few years ago, some of the minor stars on CSI tried to do the same and were canned immediately.

I think they were trying to set a precedent for 2nd/3rd tiet actors/participants in a show that such actions will result in a 100% paycut. I can't totally blame them either.

Computers can figure out all kinds of problems, except the things in the world that just don't add up.