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Comment: Re:Fuck Canadian content welfare system (Score 1) 316

by jader3rd (#47949965) Attached to: Canadian Regulator Threatens To Impose New Netflix Regulation

It is not a government's job to educate its citizens about values that it wants to promote.

I can see that being a good thing. Citizens with experience have a better chance at knowing which values are sustainable and those which are self destructive feel that it's worthwhile to find multiple ways to inform the populace of that experience. So if they want to government to do that they can. But if the idea is to create entertainment to educate the citizens, that entertainment needs to compete with existing entertainment.

Comment: Re:why does the CRTC need this list? (Score 1) 316

by jader3rd (#47949943) Attached to: Canadian Regulator Threatens To Impose New Netflix Regulation

One of the CRTC jobs is to ensure Canadian TV content gets created and we are not stuck with 100% American programming and Canadian culture disappears entirely. If everyone starts watching all their TV on Netflex and similar services, Canadian TV could all but disappear.

So if Canada got rid of the CRTC they could pay less in taxes, and get to watch what they want to watch? Dear me, whatever shall we do?

Comment: Re:why does the CRTC need this list? (Score 1) 316

by jader3rd (#47949913) Attached to: Canadian Regulator Threatens To Impose New Netflix Regulation

Then why did they appear before the Commission at all? If they truly do not operate in Canada, then nothing the CRTC does affects them and they could blow off the whole thing with impunity.

Because they have Canadian customers (both subscribers and producers of shows), and if a deal could be worked out by talking, they might as well try to talk.

Comment: Re:why does the CRTC need this list? (Score 1) 316

by jader3rd (#47949895) Attached to: Canadian Regulator Threatens To Impose New Netflix Regulation

It's not about favouring Canadian production companies so much as encouraging Canadian content for cultural reasons. Being so close to the USA leaves us vulnerable to sort of being swamped, culturally.

Given that the only show I'm watching right now is Continuum (and via Netflix) should I be feeling culturally swamped by Canada right now?

Comment: Re:Not of i*Devices (Score 1) 421

by jader3rd (#47892737) Attached to: Windows Tax Shot Down In Italy

The vendor is a different party. Hence you cannot buy a "HP" or "Sony" or "Samsung" or "Asus" computer without Windows on it.

Wait, what? Every single last vendor you mentioned there sells devices that run OS's which are competitors to Windows. All of those vendors sells devices with Android, some sell Chromebooks, and some even sells computers with Linux.

Comment: Re:Separate hardware from software (Score 1) 421

by jader3rd (#47892159) Attached to: Windows Tax Shot Down In Italy

Most people do not. Keep trolling for Microsoft.

Really? How many people do you know (who don't read Slashdot) go shopping for Cellular service without also purchasing a phone from the Cellular provider at the same time? How many people do you know expect an ISP to provide a modem when they order 'internet' service. I would love to make it illegal to prevent the same companies from providing both the service and the device to access the service, but that never flies. When something goes both the device manufacturer and the service provider will blame the other one for why your experience isn't working.

I'm aware that there are no technical limitations preventing swapping out hardware to interface with different services, but that's not what the voting public wants.

Comment: Re:Separate hardware from software (Score 1) 421

by jader3rd (#47892115) Attached to: Windows Tax Shot Down In Italy

You mean we can't have a check-box on the PC vendor's web page where we configure our device, which lists several operating systems?

You can. But people will freak out when that checkbox would say "Linux + $80". They would think "But Linux is free". While it is a free OS, the OEM wouldn't get subsidies from bloatware providers which help subsidies the cost of the computer.

Comment: Re:Separate hardware from software (Score 1) 421

by jader3rd (#47890173) Attached to: Windows Tax Shot Down In Italy

A law that forbids selling hardware and software together would increase innovation. Consumers would only be able to buy hardware and software separately. That way, hardware vendors are encouraged to document the hardware and software vendors will compete on quality. Installation procedures would become very easy very quickly due to market pressure.

Normal people don't like that though. Let's say that you try and sell product A to somebody that requires product B to function. This person has neither used nor ever had interest in A or B. Most people aren't interested in one or the other. Normal people want an A+B product where somebody else has worked out all of the compatibility problems.

Comment: Re:Many languages and... (Score 1) 729

Two reasons not to do that. First, "2." in at least some of those is a floating-point 2, so "i = 2." by itself would be ambiguous: does this assign an integer 2 and end the statement, or assign a floating-point 2. (and writing 2.0 doesn't really clarify, but rather raises the question of whether the 0 starts another statement). Second, all the old COBOL programmers who escaped that ecosystem would have something like anti-LSD-style flashbacks, and that can be dangerous.

That's still workable. A period followed by an end of line, or whitespace is the end of statement. A period that's between two numbers is a floating point number. A period surrounded by non-numbers and non-whitespace is a compilation error. I realize that the ship might have sailed as far as this is concerned, but if done originally I think it would have helped a lot of people ramp up on how to code.

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