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Comment: Here we go (Score 1) 558 558

I just went through an upgrade / refresh cycle, so normally I'm not this up-to-date with my hardware

== Laptop ==
2012 Macbook Air, 2 GHz i7, 8 GB RAM, 256 SSD

I wanted to buy the new retina Macbook Air, but the situation with ports, processor, etc was enough to keep me on this thing for the time being.

== Home desktop ==
i5-4690K, 16 GB RAM, 512 SSD
Motherboard = I don't remember, one of the ones that works well with OS X (at some point I'll hackintosh it)
GPU GTX 970
Went with the 970 b/c it's way cheaper than the 980 (and apparently has way less RAM...which was annoying to find out after the fact)
I went with the K because at some point I'll goof around with overclocking

== Workstation 1 ==
i7-4820K, 32 GB RAM, 512 SSD
Motherboard = I don't remember, something about 4 channel RAM...
GPU Titan Black
I went with the i7 to test hyper threading performance. This machine also has very good single threaded performance (it shuts down the other cores and ups the clock on one of them).
This machine is due for a PCIe SSD upgrade (for testing performance where 32 GB RAM isn't enough)
The Titan is for double precision CUDA work.
I went with the K because at some point I'll goof around with overclocking

== Workstation 2 ==
Dual Xeon E5-2660 v2 (top says I have 40 threads), 28 GB RAM, 1 TB spinning disk (it was lying around...)
Motherboard = I don't remember, it has two sockets...
GPU GTX 980
The 980 works _very_ well for real time rendering.

I plan to switch to 4k monitors on the workstations relatively soon (I want a reasonably priced IPS panel to show up).

+ - Tails reaches 1.3 -- the Linux distro that Edward Snowden used gets major update->

BrianFagioli writes: If you have nothing to hide, you shouldn't care if the government spies on you, right? Wrong. No stupider words can ever be spoken. Your privacy should be very valuable to you, even if you only do squeaky-clean things. If someone was to snoop on my computer, they wouldn't find much; some family photos, a few games and other nonsense. Guess what? It is my nonsense, and I'll do whatever it takes to secure it. If you want to cover your tracks, however, the best way is to use a CD or DVD-based operating system, as there is no hard drive access — everything is run from the read-only medium. Edward Snowden took this approach when he wanted to hide from the NSA. His OS of choice? The Linux-based Tails. Today, it hits version 1.3 and many security issues have been fixed.
Link to Original Source

Comment: Compute per watt (Score 2) 82 82

Until we reach a point where compute per watt stabilizes, it is highly unlikely that anyone would be interested in using old components to build a cluster. The fact that the parts would all be slightly different would be a headache too.
Older gear typically uses more power / FLOP, and is slower, so your time-to-solution takes a hit too.
If we get to the point where the power usage / FLOP for an N+1 device is basically the same as N, then you might see people do this, so long as they are okay with waiting longer for a result. Until then, don't hold your breath

Comment: Re:Netflix / Google's argument is surely valid (Score 1) 109 109

Interesting. I didn't realize it was the tariff that was the issue (for the moment at least). To be honest, I am OK with a tax of something like $1 / month that goes toward producing Canadian content. And something like an on-demand model, where my vote is recorded based on what I watch, seems like a decent way of deciding which content is supported. I agree with you that this current business has less to do with supporting Canadian content, and more to do with the fact that incumbents are scared by Netflix. I don't have a cable subscription and never will. Most of my friends are in the same boat. Paying for low quality content mixed with commercials feels like having a newspaper delivered to my doorstep every morning. Fun if you're pretending it is 1972, but otherwise pretty silly. Unfortunately, the CRTC, historically the place that former media executives go to retire, is unlikely to see it this way. They are basically in charge of regulating their old buddies.

Comment: Re:Netflix / Google's argument is surely valid (Score 2) 109 109

In Canada it is a bit more complicated. We have a policy here which mandates that a certain percentage of all broadcast media be Canadian content (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_content).

It means that radio stations have to play Canadian music, and that television networks must show Canadian shows.

As you can imagine, there are strong opinions about this. For example, what constitutes Canadian content? If it is an American made show that is shot on Canadian soil (Toronto playing the role of Big-American-City), should that count? Or if the writers are Canadian, but the show is produced in the US, how should it be counted? What about a celebrity gossip show, primarily about Hollywood stars, that is hosted by Canadians? I'm not making these examples up by the way.

In radio, Can-con can lead to odd things too: when there is a new Canadian band, airwaves become oversaturated with their music quite quickly, to the point where the domestic audience gets tired of them. DJs want to play popular music (mostly of US origin), but must also meet Can-con rules. A new, popular Canadian band can actually be hurt by too much exposure in a short period of time.

So the CRTC here isn't just about issuing licenses for limited airwaves. It is also about enforcing rules on the content.

My personal opinion is that Can-con (mandating some % of material be broadcast) is probably not the best approach to supporting Canadian artists. I don't think it makes sense for TV, radio, or internet.

That said, it is pretty clear to me that under the current rules, Netflix and Youtube should fall under the same umbrella. I don't see an argument how the government has the authority to set rules about radio and TV but not the internet. I suppose you could claim that wireless spectrum is a public space, therefore within the purview of the government. But that arguement falls apart since most people have cable anyway. To give you a sense of how inconsistent things currently are, if you have a cable modem, part of the signal (TV) is subject to Can-con, but if you stream (internet) it is not.

Again, I'm not coming out in favour (note the u :) of Can-con on any media provider, but the current case against Netflix etc is consistent with the law as it is written.

Comment: Eye tracking + swipe? (Score 1) 552 552

On my android phone, I can type words by swiping between letters, rather than simply poking at them with my fingers. I'm amazed how well this tech works and how fast I can write with it.

I know that eye trackers exist (and that one can select letters by hovering over them) but does eye tracking + swipe exist? If it doesn't, it would be straightforward to prototype it easily (originally you had to buy it, but now it seems to be part of the main OS. http://www.swype.com/

...actually, after a bit of googling it looks like others have thought of this: http://sciencenordic.com/texti...

Other human computer interaction options would be the various brain wave headsets which are now appearing (e.g. from google I see http://neurosky.com/ http://interaxon.ca/ etc). They tend to be less accurate, but are probably useful for things like controlling the environment (lights on and off) etc. It wouldn't be difficult to interface them with some basic home automation hardware.

I would think that finding a mix off input devices would be ideal in terms of preventing fatigue.

Once a bit of time has passed, you might consider spending some time looking through the faculty pages at your local University's CS Department. Get in contact with them. There is a lot of work (and funds) going on into HCI right now. This seems like the type of project that would get a lot of support from graduate students and faculty.

Please come back to us with a follow-up post. Don't forget to include a fundraising link for equipment costs. I would certainly contribute.

Unix: Some say the learning curve is steep, but you only have to climb it once. -- Karl Lehenbauer

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