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Comment: Re:Getting screwed in both directions (Score 5, Informative) 443

by infamous_blah (#33242432) Attached to: Microsoft May Back Off of<nobr> <wbr></nobr>.NET Languages

Thank you for this, PInvoke is probably my biggest reason in prefering .Net (mainly C#) over Java.

You can do this in Java with Java Native Access (JNA). From the JNA site:

JNA provides Java programs easy access to native shared libraries (DLLs on Windows) without writing anything but Java code—no JNI or native code is required. This functionality is comparable to Windows' Platform/Invoke and Python's ctypes. Access is dynamic at runtime without code generation.

Comment: Re:Google shouldn't worry (Score 1) 418

by infamous_blah (#32293532) Attached to: Google's Streetview Privacy Snafu Prompts Lawsuit
Leaving your door unlocked might be stupid, but it doesn't make it legal for someone to come into your home and take your stuff.

If the same 80yr old lady had a break in with the locks bolted on vs unlocked, her insurance company sure an't gona pay shit (and I sure wouldn't feel bad for her) because she DIDN'T SECURE HER DAMN HOME!!! Her data is to be handled the same damn way.

Here is a big difference between what happened and the break-in analogy. Intent does matter and since it appears to be accidental collection that makes it a lot different than Google intentionally collecting all that traffic.

Uh yeah, boooo corporate America for saying they made a mistake they had NO reason to tell anyone other than they actually do care. Which is why they pulled the project from going forward till this useless data was expunged (never used for anything). This whole thing is big non-issue to people who understand what happened. At worst their system captured a network name, and a couple useless frames of data that mean jack shit.

Comment: Re:The Second, If Not Both (Score 1) 466

by infamous_blah (#30670684) Attached to: Which Math For Programmers?

But he's definitely correct. The second is going to give you practical skills in programming -- a wide array of practical skills. The first is most likely going to give you some automata theory for computers but unless you're going into theoretical research, the second is the obvious answer. Graphics and games are all vectors, the web is becoming even more so with new browser rendering technologies. Rendering is all euclidean space transposed onto a two dimensional plane (screen) using points (pixels). Differentials are huge in the vision and image processing world and again, in graphics.

I strongly disagree with your suggested order. Algorithms are the heart of Computer Science and our representations are discrete. The first course is absolutely essential and has a lot more practical application; you must be able to understand the complexity of an algorithm and choose appropriate structures to write efficient code.

If OP is going into graphics, physics simulation or the like, then the second course is also necessary, but not in lieu of the first. The mathematical equation at hand may be continuous, but the computer model is discrete (e.g. pixels are discrete points).

However, as you said, taking both is really the best option.

Comment: Background Reading (Score 1) 720

by infamous_blah (#30052054) Attached to: Whistleblower Claims IEA Is Downplaying Peak Oil
You can find some good background reading here: What You Need to Know about Peak Oil.

There seems to be a lot of dispute over when world-wide peak oil will occur (or if it has already). On the other hand, there is consensus that US peak oil has already happened (and that's accounting for shale, Alaska, etc).

Comment: Re:Sales taxes are not 'regressive' (Score 1) 681

by infamous_blah (#29519073) Attached to: Microsoft Tax Dodge At Issue In Washington State
Roughly 10% of states have sales tax on food when you include those that have it on the county/city level. However, the statement "they are effectively only taxed on their bad habits, EG booze and ciggs" is hardly fair. There are tons of necessary items that sales tax applies to, e.g. clothes, school/office supplies, basic household items like tissue/toilet paper, etc

Comment: Re:Yep (Score 1) 835

by infamous_blah (#29357315) Attached to: Does Your College Or University Support Linux?

Pray tell, if I have sudo, how do I not have root?

hint: What is the result of

sudo su root
password:

That depends on the sudoers configuration for your user. sudo is not all or nothing, you can be restricted to a subset of commands and further restricted on arguments and whether or not the commands themselves are allowed to execute other commands. Read the man page for sudoers for the specifics.

Comment: MyLimb.com (Score 1) 295

by infamous_blah (#28683071) Attached to: Hackers' Next Target &mdash; Your Brain?

Who has MyLimb.com parked and is willing to deal?

Don't know if he's willing to deal but...

Registrant:
William Orr
5707 Mountain Oak Drive
Braselton, Georgia 30517
United States

Registered through: GoDaddy.com, Inc. (http://www.godaddy.com)
Domain Name: MYLIMB.COM
Created on: 08-Nov-06
Expires on: 08-Nov-10
Last Updated on: 09-Nov-08

Comment: Re:CapsLock (Score 2, Insightful) 806

by infamous_blah (#28336541) Attached to: Fifteen Classic PC Design Mistakes

I do not recall ever having used the CapsLock key (except out of curiousity to see whether it actually does anything.) ... CapsLock was useful once upon a time, when there was no \section{} or \textbf{}, and when pressing `shift' actually required strenght. But those days are gone.

As a programmer, I use it all the time. It's common convention in many programming languages for CONSTANT_VARIABLES to be in all caps. It may not take much for one press of the Shift key, but having to hold it down while typing words with letters from both sides of the keyboard multiplied by the number of times I need to do that in a day will cause strain in my hands.

Comment: Re:Python is just a fad. (Score 2, Insightful) 794

by infamous_blah (#28292791) Attached to: Should Undergraduates Be Taught Fortran?

Unlike Pascal, Prolog, Smalltalk and the rest of the fad languages, Fortran is still here, and it will still be here when Python is long-forgotten.

I would suggest teaching them C, but it may be too complex for a first language.

Python will be 20 years old soon and is used in many, many contexts. Whatever your opinion of FORTRAN or Python's applicability for engineering students in particular, calling Python a fad is disingenuous.

Comment: Re:No malloc( )s (Score 1) 587

It keeps track of the references to objects that have been instantiated. When the counter reaches zero, the object is automagically removed from memory without explicit programming required.

Garbage collection in Java does NOT use reference counting. Although there are various GC implementations, they are all tracing collectors. When the collector runs, it traces objects reachable from the rootset. Anything not reachable is garbage and eligible for collection.

Quark! Quark! Beware the quantum duck!

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