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Comment: Re:Why not push toward collapse? (Score 3, Informative) 237

by amorsen (#48619129) Attached to: In Breakthrough, US and Cuba To Resume Diplomatic Relations

Well, Iraq was pushed to collapse. That did not go so well. Syria was pushed to collapse. Not ideal either.

Burma/Myanmar was not pushed to collapse, and instead relations were softened. That is going fairly well.

I am not sure the push-to-collapse strategy has any successes to its name. Well possibly Germany 1945.

Comment: Re:been there, done that (Score 2) 255

by grcumb (#48614815) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Should a Liberal Arts Major Get Into STEM?

You're not a liberal arts major, by any chance, are you? 'Cuz one thing STEM tries to do is kill the belief that an anecdote counters data.

Why yes, I am a liberal arts major, who studied classical logic, among other things. I was responding to the assertion that 'most' liberal arts majors ended up as lowly restaurant workers. I countered that by asserting a) that restaurant workers are not so lowly as characterised; b) that drawing general conclusions about people's prospects based on their education does not bear out, particularly where some of the more respected and influential jobs are concerned; and c) that in a number of cases, a liberal arts education is a precursor to the kind of work that most people can only dream about.

You see, I was actually not making a positive argument so much as rebutting (and refuting) someone else's crass, inaccurate and unsubstantiated assertion that a liberal arts degree is valueless. Shocking, isn't it, to see a STEM major failing so badly at applying basic logic?

But yeah, the plural of anecdote is not always data.

P.S. For the humour-impaired: I'm a keyboard monkey, too. A liberal arts educated keyboard monkey.

Comment: Re:been there, done that (Score 4, Funny) 255

by grcumb (#48612745) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Should a Liberal Arts Major Get Into STEM?

I second this comment. besides teaching college which will probably involve a graduate degree, most of thejobs with a liberal arts degree involve asking "Do you want fries with that?"

Two things:

First - I supported myself for a decade working in bars and restaurants. There are more interesting people living interesting lives employed in that sector than just about any other.

Second - Ridley Scott went to art college. Peter Jackson was self-taught. James Cameron was a truck driver. The people who have done more to shape your vision than you're likely able to realise followed no discernible pattern of behaviour. I'd advise you to save your derision until someone's earned it.

Case in point: One 'liberal arts' friend of mine plays the king of the White Walkers on GoT. Another works on The Daily Show. How's your job look now, keyboard monkey?

Comment: Re:been there, done that (Score 1) 255

by grcumb (#48612645) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Should a Liberal Arts Major Get Into STEM?

Have an English degree, found it useless. went back got my BSEE, been employed as such ever since. short version, go back and get your degree.

Did a double major in Theatre and English Literature. After 20 years of gainful employment in systems software development and consulting, I'm now CTO at an international think tank. I also know the value of capitalisation and punctuation.

Short version: It's horses for courses; reflect carefully, then do what you feel is best. If you're smart, the real determining factor is how hard you're willing to work, and how well you continue to learn.

Comment: I should point out that WA has stronger privacy (Score 2) 420

by WillAffleckUW (#48610255) Attached to: Federal Court Nixes Weeks of Warrantless Video Surveillance

I should point out that citizens of Washington State have a State Constitution which specifically gives us stronger privacy rights than most Americans.

You can't even use GPS trackers on our cars without a specific court order, even though you can do this in most states.

Same goes for our cell phone data.

Same goes for our front yards.

Now turn off your cop cam you're recording my lawn illegally, copper!

Comment: Maps are limited by the cartographic method (Score 1) 141

A map by territory shows places that are pretty empty but have a common language.

A map by population has problems handling multiple languages in use in one location.

A map by language density using vertical bars or color shading to imply pop density might work, if dithered properly.

+ - Linking drought and climate change: difficult to do->

Submitted by Geoffrey.landis
Geoffrey.landis (926948) writes "An article about the current California drought on 538 points out that even though global climate warming may exacerbate droughts, it's nearly impossible to attribute any particular drought to climate warming: The complex, dynamic nature of our atmosphere and oceans makes it extremely difficult to link any particular weather event to climate change. That’s because of the intermingling of natural variations with human-caused ones. http://fivethirtyeight.com/fea... They also cite a Nature editorial pointing out the same thing about extreme weather: http://www.nature.com/news/ext..."
Link to Original Source

+ - The GPLv2 goes to court->

Submitted by Jason Baker
Jason Baker (3502325) writes "Despite its importance, the GPLv2 has been the subject of very few court decisions, and virtually all of the most important terms of the GPLv2 have not been interpreted by courts. This lack of court decisions is about to change due to the five interrelated cases arising from a dispute between Versata Software, Inc. ("Versata") (its parent company, Trilogy Development Corporation, is also involved, but Versata is taking the lead) and Ameriprise Financial, Inc. ("Ameriprise"). The courts in two separate cases issued decisions on November 25, just before Thanksgiving.

These cases are dealing with four important terms in the GPLv2: 1) What are the remedies for breach of the terms of the GPLv2? 2) What is a "distribution" under the GPLv2 that triggers the obligations under the GPLv2? 3) Does the GPLv2 include a patent license? 4) What type of integration between proprietary code and GPLv2 licensed code will result in creating a “derivative work” and subject such proprietary code to the terms of the GPLv2?"

Link to Original Source

+ - Shellshock Worm Exploiting Unpatched QNAP NAS Devices->

Submitted by msm1267
msm1267 (2804139) writes "A worm exploiting network attached storage devices vulnerable to the Bash flaw is scanning the Internet for more victims.

The worm opens a backdoor on QNAP devices, but to date it appears the attackers are using the exploit to run a click-fraud scam, in addition to maintaining persistence on owned boxes.

“The goal appears to be to backdoor the system, so an attacker could come back later to install additional malware,” said Johannes Ullrich, head of the Internet Storm Center at the SANS Institute.

QNAP of Taiwan released a patch in October for the Bash vulnerability in its Turbo NAS products. Like many other vulnerable products and devices, owners may not be aware that Bash is present and exposed. Bash was among a litany of Internet-wide vulnerabilities uncovered this year; the flaw in Bash, or Bourne Again Shell, affects Linux and UNIX distributions primarily, but also Windows in some cases. Bash is accessed, often quietly, by any number of functions which makes comprehensive patching difficult even though all major Linux distributions and most vendors have issued patches."

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