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Submission + - MST3K Kickstarter about to break record (

the_Bionic_lemming writes: Recently Joel Hodgson, the creator of Mystery Science 3000 that had a successful run of over 197 shows has after 15 years launched a kickstarter to relaunch the series. Previous MST3K Is Kickstarting Back To Life, MST3K Successfully Crowdsources Its Comeback.
In just over two weeks Joel has been wildly successful in not only having over 25000 fans contribute, but actually scoring the second highest show kickstarter on record — he has just under two weeks to shoot past the Number 1 kickstarter, Veronica Mars.

Additionally , Joel had an eight year old girl write in during the long series run , and they did her letter on the air (something the fans loved — having their mail on the air) . A few days ago, Freezepop's Ashley (who was that 8 year old girl) sang a wonderful tribute with Joel for the Kickstarter .

Comment And I bet everything seemed hunky-dory in Rome.... (Score 1) 197

...before it was sacked. Some folks see weakness and irresolution growing in the western world. They see barbarians like ISIS rising up to fill the vacuum left by the west's loss of confidence- and they see dark ages coming again. If nothing is done, the new dark age may be 50 years out, or they may be 20 years out. (And certainly dark times have arrived for real in parts of the middle east.)

Civilizations rise because they have insights, standards and practices that are superior to those around them. Those civilizations fall when they take their position for granted, and think those standards and practices are 'mean' or 'outmoded.'

Comment Depends if you want to support it (Score 4, Informative) 313

That really is the big issue with a self build: If something goes wrong, you have to track it down and handle all the support. If you get a pre-built from a good vendor, they'll handle it all. Say what you want about Dell, but all you have to do is run their diags (baked in to the UEFI) and call them with the code, they'll send a dude with the parts needed.

So that should be the major thing you think about. If you don't want to do support, then buy it from a vendor that will provide you with support to the level you require. I tend to recommend Dell because their hardware is reasonable and they have support available everywhere. They subcontract it, but it all works well. We use it at work all the time.

If you are willing to do support yourself, then building it gets you precisely what you want. I build my system at home because I have very exacting requirements for what I'm after and nobody has that kind of thing for sale. Like I don't want a "good large power supply", I want a Seasonic Platinum 1000, nothing else.

Also you'll find that generally at the higher end of things you save money building a system. For more consumer/office range stuff it usually is a wash: They build the mass market systems around as cheap as you could afford to. However when you start talking higher end gaming stuff, you can pay a large premium for things.

As an example I just built a system for a good friend of mine. He wanted some very, very high end hardware and pretty specific requirements. Origin PC would get him what he wanted... for about $9,000. I put it together for around $6,000. The gamer stuff often commands a hefty premium.

Comment Re:Duh (Score 1) 754

This lets the desktop environments have more advanced features then they would with init systems that don't do this delegation.

First, is it the regular user account or the DE itself which essentially gets its privileges escalated? Either way, that sounds inherently dangerous -- if you want the DE to be all powerfull, just login as root (there are good reasons not to login as root of course, but if systemD is doing it for you anyway, why even bother with the distinction between root and user accounts).

Comment Huh? (Score 1) 108

"And now, ongoing research [...] looks poised to deliver the first practical device by the end of this decade."

So up until now the multibillion-dollar industry has been founded entirely on impractical devices? Or if they mean the first practical vacuum tube of that particular type it might be useful if the summary gave some kind of brief explanation about what makes it different from/better than other vacuum tubes.

(The TFA probably explains it, but the site is blocked for me.)

Comment Re:I'll believe it when I see it (Score 1) 50

And yet for all your misdirected Windows whining DirectX for Windows is the only area that AMD cards perform well. Their Linux drivers blow, as noted by other posts here, and that is because AMD can't write OpenGL drivers to save their life.

nVidia, on the other hand, has extremely fast and solid drivers for Linux.

Comment Well of course, because Linux is OpenGL (Score 1) 50

And AMD can't handle OpenGL. I don't know why, I'm not sure what's so hard, I'm not sure if there's a monster that guards the OpenGL specs in the AMD office or something, but they have sucked at GL for over a decade, and show no signs of getting any better. They can't claim it is because of an API limitation either. For whatever you want to say about the mess that is OpenGL, nVidia makes their GL drivers dead even with their DX drivers. You can use either rendering path and can't tell the difference in features or speed.

That is also why I'm real skeptical that Vulkan is going to do anything for AMD. While they are heavily involved in the development, they are involved with OpenGL's development too (ATi was a voting member on the ARB and is a promoter with Khronos Group). Given that Vulkan is heavily GL based, originally being named glNext, I worry that AMD will suck at performance with it as well.

Comment I'll believe it when I see it (Score 2, Insightful) 50

Not the driver, that's out, but that they are going to change how they do drivers. They've said that numerous times before, and always the situation is the same. They are very slow at getting actual release drivers out (they are forever beta versions) and their OpenGL performance and support is garbage (to the point that HFSS would fail to run on systems with AMD cards).

So AMD: Less talk, more good drivers. I want to support you, I really do, but I've been burned too many times.

Comment Re:FUD at least sort of. (Score 5, Insightful) 199

#1 It's a spokesman for Nest saying that it isn't transmitting when you think you've turned it off.

#2 If the device is already hardwired to allow it to shut down the LED without shutting down the camera then it's only one software update/hack away from transmitting while it appears to be off. (Assuming that such a "feature" hasn't already been included and is just waiting for a signal to activate.)

I don't think i tend towards excessive paranoia, but having a camera attached to the internet with a power switch which doesn't actually power it down seems a bit sketchy to me. Even if Nest/Google the corporation has fully honorable intentions the situation still seems liable to potential abuse.

Comment And what does that cost for gigabit routing? (Score 1) 112

The problem PFSense has as compared to consumer routers is that running on normal Intel CPUs it needs more CPU power (and thus cost) to be able to forward a given amount of traffic. Plus all the NICs and such are separate silicon. Boradcom makes little all-in-one chips that have a couple of ARM cores that have acceleration for routing and so on. Also they have things like an ethernet switch and ethernet PHYs on the chip so they needn't be added. Have a look at a BCM4709A for an example that is popular in routers.

PFSense is good but it is not the most economical thing if you are talking features matching a consumer router, meaning gig routing, multiple ports, and wifi, you can have your costs go up a fair bit. Particularly if you also then want it to be fairly small and low power. If you hop over to PFSense's site it would cost about $575 for a SG-2440 with WiFi which would give features roughly on par with a consumer router.

While I'd much rather have that over a consumer router, a consumer router is in fact what I have because I didn't want to spend a ton of money for a home router.

All Finagle Laws may be bypassed by learning the simple art of doing without thinking.