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Comment: Re: Finally (Score 1) 62

by hawguy (#48933087) Attached to: Amazon Takes On Microsoft, Google With WorkMail For Businesses

> Rackspace

In general yes they're great, but when we used Rackspace, we used their proprietary garbage Microsoft Exchange product. That is probably what the GP was talking about. It is complete and utter garbage. It constantly loses email. After switching to running our own server (a ten year-old Dell with CentOS, Postfix, SquirrelMal, etc., all pretty easy to setup and all free), the amount of mail from customers more than tripled, and we had to hire new people. It saved our business. Because Microsoft is so embarrassed by that Exchange product, they can't release source code so Rackspace can't fix any of the problems. Exchange is a nightmare, but trying to do it at the scale of Rackspace is hell. There is a reason, for example, the forty person team at Microsoft I worked for from 2002-2007 had over $200k worth of hardware to run mail very poorly. We spent about $6k per user in just hardware! When you overspec hardware by that much, Exchange doesn't lose email as often, but even that massive kit would lose messages if someone attached a file sent to the entire team. Then Exchange would thrash for several minutes and lose all other incoming mail.

I managed exchange 2007 for 500 users and we had about $14K of hardware, including the replicated Exchange server in the remote data center (but not including the AD servers and the tape backup hardware). We lost the primary site a few times due to power failure, and we had a RAID controller failure in the remote node that brought it down, and we never lost any email or had any significant unscheduled downtime. We did have to restore a few deleted employee mailboxes from backup tape due to a lawsuit, but that wasn't a problem either. It was not trivial to set it up properly, but we paid a consulting company to come in for a day and validate our configuration.

If MS spent $6K per person on hardware, it's because they wanted to, not because they had to, we did it for $33/user in hardware costs.

I left the company as we were setting up the 2010 servers on brand new hardware (virtualized on VMWare, so it's hard to pin down the hardware costs). I'm no fan of Exchange, I think it's too difficult to set up properly and requires more hardware than it should, but when set up properly, it does run well. Paying professional services fees was well worth it to make sure we had it set up correctly.

Comment: Re:Privacy (Score 1) 62

by hawguy (#48929297) Attached to: Amazon Takes On Microsoft, Google With WorkMail For Businesses

Though you have to trust AWS with the plain text at some time since every mail server and client has to hand the message over in plain text (it may come in over an encrypted tunnel, but it needs to be decrypted by their mailservers).

No, it doesn't. S/MIME, PGP-mail, etc. Of course that only works if the party you're e-mailing can also use client-side e-mail encryption.

And how close to you think the internet is to ubiquitous client side encryption? Oh, right.

You might as well speculate how secure mail would be if it were personally delivered by unicorns.

I'll add that the OP could use S/MIME and/or PGP right now with any mail provider (as I said in my original reply), at the expense of server side searching (which is one of the best things about Gmail -- I can search years of mail archives instantly)... all he has to do is convince everyone he corresponds with to do the same. Oh, and zealously protect his private key.

Comment: Re:Privacy (Score 1) 62

by hawguy (#48929279) Attached to: Amazon Takes On Microsoft, Google With WorkMail For Businesses

Though you have to trust AWS with the plain text at some time since every mail server and client has to hand the message over in plain text (it may come in over an encrypted tunnel, but it needs to be decrypted by their mailservers).

No, it doesn't. S/MIME, PGP-mail, etc. Of course that only works if the party you're e-mailing can also use client-side e-mail encryption.

And how close to you think the internet is to ubiquitous client side encryption? Oh, right.

You might as well speculate how secure mail would be if it were personally delivered by unicorns.

Comment: Re:Finally (Score 3, Insightful) 62

by hawguy (#48928975) Attached to: Amazon Takes On Microsoft, Google With WorkMail For Businesses

Another Kloud Service. At last my company can have its email scanned and delivered to my competitors. Just what I needed.

Most small businesses are better off entrusting their mail to a cloud provider than to try to run their own email service and trying to keep it secure and highly available.

Comment: Re:Privacy (Score 3, Informative) 62

by hawguy (#48928967) Attached to: Amazon Takes On Microsoft, Google With WorkMail For Businesses

My top priorities for email service are quality of spam filtering, support for unlimited aliases, search, and rules. I think labels work better than folders for categorization. I have not found any Amazon documentation which addresses these issues.

My top priority is privacy.

Does their service have built-in encryption, such that they cannot decrypt the message contents?

Not if you want server side search. Though you have to trust AWS with the plain text at some time since every mail server and client has to hand the message over in plain text (it may come in over an encrypted tunnel, but it needs to be decrypted by their mailservers).

If you really don't trust anyone with your email, tell everyone that emails you to encrypt everything with your public key, then you can decrypt the messages on an airgapped computer when you're ready to read them.

Comment: Non sequitor (Score 3, Insightful) 420

by hawguy (#48924357) Attached to: Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'

"We understand the value of encryption and the importance of security,"

I do not think that phrase means what he thinks that means when the government's position is that all encryption needs a back door - NSA analysts have already shown that they'll use their access to data to invade privacy (i.e. looking up data of ex- girlfriends).

Though I'm pretty sure this is just posturing by the government to give everyone a false sense of security, and that Google, Apple and others have provided secret back doors that they aren't allowed to talk about.

Comment: Re:No fuck off (Score 1) 461

by hawguy (#48909053) Attached to: Police Organization Wants Cop-Spotting Dropped From Waze App

Every time I see a cop doing something useless like sitting at the side of the road I want to see their budget cut. They do that crap instead of helping with real crimes. And don't say "but the traffic cops are the same cops that would be investigating crimes" because it's all under one budget.

How do you know they are doing something useless and aren't sitting there filling out paperwork while keeping on eye on the road looking for the more egregious violations? You may argue that filling out paperwork is a useless waste of their time, but no police officer has ever said "Gee, I sure wish I had more mandatory paperwork to do!" A single felony arrest can result in several hours of paperwork to complete, and If it's not all filed perfectly, that may let the suspect go free.

Comment: Re:The solution is obvious (Score 1) 577

Google has stopped patching Android 4.3 and lower. Instead they want you to upgrade the OS, and they don't give a rat's ass whether that is actually possible. How is that not worse than pulling an XP,

Even if they released a patch, they can't force phone manufacturers to release it, and they probably won't.

considering that Android 4.3 was the latest version just seven months ago?

4.4 was announced in Sept 2013 and shipping in Oct 2013, so 4.3 hasn't been the latest version for about 14 months.

Comment: Re: In after somebody says don't run Windows. (Score 2, Informative) 467

by hawguy (#48891111) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best Anti-Virus Software In 2015? Free Or Paid?

Any active AV software worth 5 seconds of attention watches the resident virtual memory ranges of all processes on the computer, they pick up virus signatures in both local processes and things running inside VMs unless you're running some kind of cheap AV software from the 90s that simply scans your non-volatile memory systems.

I've never heard of AV software scanning all memory pages of all processes. It seems like that would be hugely expensive in terms of CPU resources because a VM can easily touch many gigabytes of RAM in a very short term, and somehow the AV software has to compare this entire dirty page set against a database containing hundreds of thousands, if not millions of potential virus signatures. Without help from the hypervisor, it seems like this would be even harder since when it sees a dirty page, it has no idea where it came from, how it got there, or what it's doing, so it has to scan every block of data just in case it happened to be executable data.

When I was testing AV software, I played with a number of real and test viruses in my disposable VM, yet the host system never alerted on any of them.

Comment: Re:What It Is Made Of (Score 1) 211

by hawguy (#48890887) Attached to: At Oxford, a Battery That's Lasted 175 Years -- So Far

Researchers would love to know what the battery is made of [...] It's made of what's called a "dry pile," [...] They use alternating discs of silver, zinc, sulfur, and other materials to generate low currents of electricity.

Well.. that answers that question.

Yeah, just gotta get me some of them other materials and I can build one of my own! Maybe Amazon sells them.

Comment: Re:Neighbors, (Score 1) 85

by hawguy (#48890747) Attached to: 'Never Miss Another Delivery' - if You Have a TrackPIN (Video)

Really? This needs to be said?

For people that live in an urban environment - you have this thing called NEIGHBORS. I bet you $100 there is a stay at home person within 2 blocks of anyone living in a city. Befriend them. Be nice to them. Chances are they are bored. It's the ethical thing to do. They will gladly accept your package.

For people that live in a rural environment. Leave it on the back porch. If you don't have a neighbor to receive it, then that means likely there is no one to steal it.

Isn't that person going to get tired of accepting packages for every neighbor in a 2 block radios?

I get so many packages from Amazon that i wouldn't even as a friend to accept them all, let alone a neighbor down the block. What happens with this friendly neighbor when UPS says she signed for 3 packages, but she only gives you two, and your $600 iPhone is the one that's missing. Now you're out $600 because UPS has a signed delivery receipt.

My next door neighbor does work from home, but she usually doesn't bother to accept her own packages (they leave them on her front porch) because she's *working*.

Comment: Isn't that how the transporter works? (Score 2) 162

by hawguy (#48880379) Attached to: Researchers Moot "Teleportation" Via Destructive 3D Printing

Isn't that exactly how the transporter works? Surely they don't actually disassemble the body atom-by-atom, convert it to energy, then stream it to the remote site.

I figured they used a high-resolution scanner to scan the body, then send an energy beam to the remote site to reconstruct an exact replica of the person being transported. After the copy is complete, the original body is no longer needed and is disintegrated.

Comment: Re:Jurassic Park (Score 1) 130

by hawguy (#48879381) Attached to: New Advance Confines GMOs To the Lab Instead of Living In the Wild

The lysine contingency is intended to prevent the spread of the animals in case they ever get off the island. Dr. Wu inserted a gene that makes a single faulty enzyme in protein metabolism. The animals can't manufacture the amino acid lysine. Unless they're continually supplied with lysine by us, they'll slip into a coma and die.

"...This spring, in the Ismaloya section, which is to the north, some unknown animals ate the crops in a very peculiar manner. They moved each day, in a straight line-almost as straight as an arrow-from the coast, into the mountains, into the jungle."
Grant sat upright.
"Like a migration," Guitierrez said. "Wouldn't you say?"
"What crops?" Grant said.
"Well, it was odd. They would only eat agama beans and soy, and sometimes chickens."
Grant said, "Foods rich in lysine..."

Comment: Re:Nope (Score 1) 790

by hawguy (#48878409) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Sounds We Don't Hear Any More?

Stability Control is a superset of Traction Control. You can have Traction Control without Stability Control

Those two statements contradict each other. Do you mean SC is a subset of TC? If SC is a superset of TC, then you can have SC without TC, but not TC without SC.

Since I can't draw an image here, imagine a circle around the standard car (standard as in "normal", not "manual transmission") below that encompases only itself, then another circle around Standard+TC (since you can't have Traction Control without a standard car), then finally a big circle around all three:

Standard -> TC -> SC

SC contains many other possible components (active suspension, independent braking, etc), (afaik, it always includes TC) so you'll have other components next to TC that are included in the SC set.

So you can peel back the layers, remove the SC layer and you can still have a standard car with or without TC.

Thus, SC is a superset that encompasses TC and other components.

Today's scientific question is: What in the world is electricity? And where does it go after it leaves the toaster? -- Dave Barry, "What is Electricity?"

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