Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:SSL/TLS may not help if you use Cloudflare (Score 2) 105

by hawguy (#48225043) Attached to: Researcher Finds Tor Exit Node Adding Malware To Downloads

There is no cloud service provider that is approved for handling credit card information at this time. That is not an accident.

It's not clear which flavor of "cloud" you're referring to.

If you mean IaaS, Amazon AWS is PCI certified:

https://aws.amazon.com/complia...

If you mean PaaS, WIndows Azure is certified:

http://azure.microsoft.com/blo...

If you mean SaaS, Stripe is certified:

https://stripe.com/help/securi...

Of course, even if the service provider is certified, it's up to the customer to ensure that their own implementation is compliant - the service provider certification is just one checkmark in the requirements.

Comment: Re:Who wants a gigabit cellular network? (Score 2) 52

by hawguy (#48182709) Attached to: Gigabit Cellular Networks Could Happen, With 24GHz Spectrum

All a gigabit cellular network would do is give you the ability to hit your data limit in less than a minute. I would prefer to take time to savor the precious data I've paid through the nose for and my provider has so thoughtfully allocated to me.

Well. I guess that's one way to take a shit on technology before it even materializes.

And I thought I was a pessimist.

Oh, and by the way, anytime people want to start actually enforcing these things called anti-monopoly laws so you might have a fucking choice in the matter ...

As long as the current duopolies keep feeding legislators with money, there's not going to be any real anti-trust enforcement.

Comment: Re:Blades (Score 1) 56

by hawguy (#48170049) Attached to: Making Best Use of Data Center Space: Density Vs. Isolation

You don't really need two separate filers, you just need a two headed filer to prevent any single point of failure

Til you lose the site...

I'm pretty sure that it goes without saying that single-site redundancy means that if you lose the site, you lose everything. Though if you have a segmented datacenter, Netapp will let you separate the heads by up to 500 meters. Likewise, you can separate the disk trays so you can lose an entire datacenter segment without losing data.

If you want replication across sites, Netapp will be more than happy to help you out with a variety of synchronous and asynchronous replication options. For a price, of course.

Comment: Re:Blades (Score 1) 56

by hawguy (#48168795) Attached to: Making Best Use of Data Center Space: Density Vs. Isolation

You should have your VM images on some storage system like a NetApp

Nope. That's a single point of failure. You need two of those, too.

Basically you need to have two racks in different DCs with replication between their filers

Or you need to accept that you can't guarantee uptime

You don't really need two separate filers, you just need a two headed filer to prevent any single point of failure. You can lose anything (even a controller on a disk shelf) and not even notice until the replacement is fedexed to you tomorrow.

Comment: we need a new NSA (Score 1) 106

by hawguy (#48161513) Attached to: FBI Warns Industry of Chinese Cyber Campaign

The USA should have an agency (maybe call it the NSA+) that's tasked with helping companies shore up cyber defenses... Maybe even doing code reviews and penetration testing of common software to look for vulnerabilities. Instead we have an NSA that exploits vulnerabilities and creates new backdoors into software and networks with no real oversight or accountability

Comment: Total Isolation? (Score 4, Informative) 139

by hawguy (#48155065) Attached to: HBO To Offer Online Streaming Without TV Subscription

By now, everyone not living in total isolation knows that HBO has announced plans to offer content streaming in 2015 with no TV subscription requirements.

I like to think that I'm not in total isolation, I read online news (including Slashdot), occasionally check in to Facebook and Twitter, but I never heard this before.

I heard that all the cool kids are on Snapchat now - I suppose that's where this news broke?

Comment: Re:Take the money and run (Score 1) 54

by hawguy (#48154817) Attached to: Tech Workers Oppose Settlement They Reached In Silicon Valley Hiring Case

When the settlement was first announced (works out to $1-2K/defendant) I sent a complaint about the small amount to the generic email address at the plaintiff's law firm. Much to my surprise, one of the lawyers on the case contacted me back. He pointed out the defendant's legal budgets are essentially infinite, and they are more than willing to fight the case to the supreme court. Once you get there, a victory by the plaintiffs are not assured. Remember, these are the guys who handed down Citizen's United.

Do you want a new TV now, or a very(!) small chance to get a new car 5-10 years from now? That's what it comes down to.

As someone who works in Silicon Valley and is paid one of the insane salaries earned by tech workers here, $1K or even $5K ($600 - $3K after taxes?) of "found money" is just not that much money. I'd gladly gamble it on continued litigation just to make sure that the companies involved actually felt some pain, even if there wasn't the prospect of a 10X higher settlement in the future. $300M is barely a slap on the risk to a company that has billions in the bank.

Though I can see why the lawyers were happy to settle and get their cut of a $300M payout rather than risk years of litigation with no payout.

Comment: Re:Systemic abuse can only be handled one way (Score 5, Insightful) 54

by hawguy (#48153603) Attached to: Tech Workers Oppose Settlement They Reached In Silicon Valley Hiring Case

That sounds great and all... but court decisions that bankrupt companies result in pretty much the same thing every time. The company goes bankrupt and, at best, the lawyers get paid. Then the company reopens with all the same people that made the decision in charge but under new ownership and the debt gets written off. The old owners would be all those same employees that had their retirement in stock which is now worthless. The people in charge are long retired and don't care.

I agree that it's not fair, but there simply doesn't exist the legal mechanisms to make managers that made these decisions over a decade ago pay. The primary culprit seemed to be Steve Jobs and God took care of him.

Somehow I don't think a multibillion dollar settlement is going to force Google or Apple into bankruptcy:

http://www.bizjournals.com/san...

Apple Inc.'s $158.8 billion cash stockpile more than triples the $48.5 billion currently in the coffers of the U.S. government, according to a new report.
Microsoft Corp. and Google Inc. also have also posted cash and cash equivalents worth more than the total U.S. Treasury at roughly $84 billion and $58 billion, respectively, according to U.S. Trust data cited by British newspaper the Telegraph.

Part of the reason they have these multi billion dollar cash reserves is by illegally colluding to keep employee turnover down and reduce wages.

Comment: Re:That's not the reason you're being ignored. (Score 1) 405

by hawguy (#48151199) Attached to: Flight Attendants Want Stricter Gadget Rules Reinstated

They don't want people looking at their devices with their headphones in when the captain says "brace for impact" a moment before you're supposed to land normally. It's not that hard to just be ready for an important announcement before takeoff and landing. And they're right that you want everything stowed away for those two phases of the flight.

I'll take my chances that even if I did brace for impact it wouldn't make a significant difference in my survival or chance of injury. And whether I'm looking at my kindle, staring out the window, even staring right at the flight attendant in the jump seat, I don't think it's going to affect my reaction time at all. Even with headphones on I can hear cabin announcements (I sure wish I couldn't, so I could sleep while the captain points out that we're crossing over the Rocky Mountains).

I don't remember ever being asked to stow a book, and my kindle is smaller and lighter than most hardcover books (even many paperbacks). Besides, I've seen the overhead compartments come unlatched during severe turbulence, so in the event of a real crash, a loose kindle is the least of anyone's worries.

The problem isn't whether you brace or not but if that kindle you're holding flies out of your hand and moves fast enough to hurt someone due to heavy turbulence, for example, or an actual crash. Not all crashes kill everyone on board and it would suck if someone who would have lived instead died from having your kindle halfway through their noggin.

But they are ok with the 2 lb book I'm carrying or the can of coke (or bottle of wine/whiskey) that the flight attendant just sold me knocking them in the head or the 300 lb beverage cart ending up in their lap? Airlines still let infants travel on their parent's lap, surely if they were worried about my Kindle hitting someone in the head, they'd be worried about the child becoming a projectile.

Sure, I understand that loose items are dangerous in a crash,but if that's a significant risk, the solution to that is to ban *all* of the items, not just the ones that happen to have a battery.

Comment: Re:That's not the reason you're being ignored. (Score 1) 405

by hawguy (#48142753) Attached to: Flight Attendants Want Stricter Gadget Rules Reinstated

She might do better to give everyone a lecture on the perils of obesity, and go all Richard Simmons on them, get everyone up out of their seats and doing calisthenics. Might save more lives doing that instead.

For that matter, requiring passengers to sit through driver training exercises on flights would do a lot more to keep them safe than making them put down an iPad during takeoff/landing given that they are *far* more likely to die in a car than a plane.

Comment: Re:Do it like a virgin (Score 1) 405

by hawguy (#48141145) Attached to: Flight Attendants Want Stricter Gadget Rules Reinstated

Virgin Airlines has a video instead of flight attendants do the safety spiel.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

Time for other airlines to get with the times.

United has a new "humorous" preflight briefing, and if I hadn't already been through hundreds of preflight briefings, I'm not sure that I'd understand exactly what I'm supposed to do based on this video. I can't believe the FAA ever approved it.

Comment: Re:That's not the reason you're being ignored. (Score 5, Interesting) 405

by hawguy (#48141091) Attached to: Flight Attendants Want Stricter Gadget Rules Reinstated

They don't want people looking at their devices with their headphones in when the captain says "brace for impact" a moment before you're supposed to land normally. It's not that hard to just be ready for an important announcement before takeoff and landing. And they're right that you want everything stowed away for those two phases of the flight.

I'll take my chances that even if I did brace for impact it wouldn't make a significant difference in my survival or chance of injury. And whether I'm looking at my kindle, staring out the window, even staring right at the flight attendant in the jump seat, I don't think it's going to affect my reaction time at all. Even with headphones on I can hear cabin announcements (I sure wish I couldn't, so I could sleep while the captain points out that we're crossing over the Rocky Mountains).

I don't remember ever being asked to stow a book, and my kindle is smaller and lighter than most hardcover books (even many paperbacks). Besides, I've seen the overhead compartments come unlatched during severe turbulence, so in the event of a real crash, a loose kindle is the least of anyone's worries.

This screen intentionally left blank.

Working...