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+ - The quest to restore your faith in humanity->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "In the era of clickbait, journalists like to make absurd promises in headlines in hopes of helping them go viral--and one of the most powerful, widely-made, silliest claims is that a listicle, photo, or video will "restore your faith in humanity." Over at Technologizer, I've written a history of the meme (which has been booming for the past two years, although I found a precursor in a razor ad from 1930)."
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+ - After 47 years, Computerworld ceases print publication->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "In June 1967, a weekly newspaper called Computerworld launched. Almost exactly 47 years later, it's calling it quits in print form to focus on its website and other digital editions. The move isn't the least bit surprising, but it's also the end of an era--and I can' t think of any computing publication which had a longer run. Over at Technologizer, I shared some thoughts on what Computerworld meant to the world, to its publisher, IDG, and to me."
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+ - Where Have You Gone, Peter Norton?->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "If you used an PC in the 1980s and 1990s, the chances were very good that you used utility software which came in a box with a picture of Peter Norton on it. The Norton brand still exists, but those packaging photos of Norton himself are long gone--along with the whole classic era of utility software they represented. Over at Technologizer, I paid tribute to this one-time icon of the PC industry."
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+ - 50 Years of BASIC, the Language That Made Computers Personal->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "On May 1, 1964 at 4 a.m. in a computer room at Dartmouth University, the first programs written in BASIC ran on the university's brand-new time-sharing system. With these two innovations, John Kemeny and Thomas Kurtz didn't just make it easier to learn how to program a computer: They offered Dartmouth students a form of interactive, personal computing years before the invention of the PC. Over at TIME.com, I chronicle BASIC's first 50 years with a feature with thoughts from Kurtz, Microsoft's Paul Allen and many others."
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+ - This 1981 BYTE magazine cover explains why we're so bad at tech predictions->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "If you remember the golden age of BYTE magazine, you remember Robert Tinney's wonderful cover paintings. BYTE's April 1981 cover featured an amazing Tinney image of a smartwatch with a tiny text-oriented interface, QWERTY keyboard, and floppy drive. It's hilarious--but 33 years later, it's also a smart visual explanation of why the future of technology so often bears so little resemblance to anyone's predictions. I wrote about this over at TIME.com."
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+ - The inside story of Gmail on its tenth anniversary->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "Google officially--and mischievously--unveiled Gmail on April Fools' Day 2004. That makes this its tenth birthday, which I celebrated by talking to a bunch of the people who created the service for TIME.com. It's an amazing story: The service was in the works for almost three years before the announcement, and faced so much opposition from within Google that it wasn't clear it would ever reach consumers."
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+ - Tim Berners-Lee's amazing 1989 proposal for the web->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "It's well known that the World Wide Web originated in Tim Berners-Lee's 1989 proposal for an information-management system for his employer, CERN. That document turns 25 today, and there's no better way to celebrate the web's birthday than to celebrate it. What Berners-Lee proposed was simple, expandable, social, compatible and distributed — so smart an approach to sharing information that it's easy to envision it going strong generations from now. Over at TIME.com, I posted an appreciation."
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+ - Project Ara: Inside Google's modular smartphones->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "Google is releasing more details on Project Ara, its effort — originally spearheaded by Motorola — to reinvent the smartphone in a form made up of hot-swappable modules that consumers can configure as they choose, then upgrade later as new technologies emerge. Over at TIME, I have an in-depth report on the product, which Google is aiming to release about a year from now."
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+ - LinkedIn kills controversial Intro service for iPhone->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "Back in October, LinkedIn unveiled Intro, which inserted contact info into the iPhone's Mail — even though that app has no mechanism for plugins. Intro worked by serving as a middleman between your e-mail account and your phone, and injecting HTML, a technique which got it lots of extremely negative feedback from the blogosphere.

And now LinkedIn is discontinuing Intro, though it's being vague about why it's giving up after slightly over three months. People who are using it will need to go through several steps to get rid of it, or their mail won't work as of March 7."

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+ - the story of tech, as told by Google Books Ngram Viewer->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "Google's Ngram Viewer is a fascinating way to chart the ups and downs of different phrases over time. I plugged a bunch of tech-related terms in, and cranked out graphs which succinctly show the story of browsers, operating systems, electronics retailers and other rivals over the past few decades. The results are over at TIME.com."
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+ - The $100 3D-Printed Artificial Limb-> 1

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "In 2012, TIME wrote about Daniel Omar, a 14-year-old in South Sudan who lost both arms to a bomb dropped by his own government. Mick Ebeling of Not Impossible Labs read the story, was moved — and went to Sudan, where he set up a 3D printing lab which can produce an artificial arm for $100. Omar and others have received them, and Ebeling hopes that other organizations around the world will adopt his open-source design to help amputees, many of whom will never receive more conventional prosthetics."
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+ - The 47 dumbest moments of 2013->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "Over at TIME.com, I rounded up the year's dumbest moments in technology. Yes, the launch of Healthcare.gov is included, as are Edward Snowden's revelations. But so are a bunch of people embarrassing themselves on Twitter, both BlackBerry and Lenovo hiring celebrities to (supposedly) design products, the release of glitchy products ranging from OS X 10.9 Mavericks to the new Yahoo Mail, and much more."
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+ - Grace Hopper's job recommendation for my friend Ann's dad->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "In 1953, Dr. Grace Hopper — at the time, the creator of the Univac 1's compiler, and now remembered as one of computer science's most legendary figures — provided a job recommendation for Second Lieutenant Herb Finnie. She wrote Finnie about it, and decades later, his daughter, my friend Ann Finnie, discovered that charming piece of correspondence in her father's foot locker. Google's Google Doodle yesterday celebrating the 107th anniversary of Hopper's birth inspired Ann to share the letter, which I've published and written about at TIME.com."
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+ - Microsoft compliments Chromebooks by attacking them->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "The latest round in Microsoft's "Scroogled" campaign against Google is a simulated episode of PAWN STARS in which the pawn shop rejects a Chromebook. Over at Time.com, I assess it — and conclude that by making fun of Chromebooks, even though their market share is tiny, Microsoft is acknowledging that they do present a threat to Windows."
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+ - For one night only, the Homebrew Computer Club reconvenes->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc (1641347) writes "In the mid-1970s, Silicon Valley's legendary Homebrew Computer Club did as much as any one organization to jumpstart the PC revolution, playing an instrumental role in the creation of Apple and numerous other important companies. On Monday night, dozens of its former members — including Woz himself — attended an amazing reunion that was funded by a successful Kickstarter campaign. I attended and covered it for TIME."
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C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas l'Informatique. -- Bosquet [on seeing the IBM 4341]

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