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Study Says Software Engineers Have the Best US Jobs 337

Posted by Soulskill
from the i'm-sure-you're-all-totally-on-board-with-this dept.
D H NG writes "According to a new study by CareerCast.com, software engineers have the best jobs of 2011 in the United States, based on factors such as income, working environment, stress, physical demands and job outlook, using Labor Department and Census data. Mid-level software engineers make between $87,000 and $132,000 a year, putting them in the top 25% of the 200 professions studied by income. Software engineers beat out last year's number one job, actuary, which came in third, behind mathematician."

Comment: Re:Shatters Confidence of Control (Score 1) 411

by hao3 (#33534440) Attached to: WikiLeaks Set To Release Unpublished Iraq War Docs

He promised more openness and accountability. Not absolute openness and accountability. He implemented it in some areas, and not so much in others. He may even have done the opposite in some area. Maybe when Americans, 'thinking' or otherwise, stop having wild expectations of their politicians, and, regardless of who they elect, criticise them (not constructively) whether they actually do what they say or not, then maybe the politicians wouldn't be so much stuck in between a rock and a hard place and would be more realistic and straightforward with their voters. So much for 'alternative views'.

People get the government they deserve. Nowhere is that more self-evident than in the US.

Comment: Re:NO! (Score 3, Insightful) 411

by hao3 (#33534284) Attached to: WikiLeaks Set To Release Unpublished Iraq War Docs

A 'representative republic' is a democracy. It may not be a 'pure democracy' but it's a democracy nonetheless. No country is a 'pure democracy'. It's just ludicrous word-games masquerading as intelligent analysis and fabricated history. It's part of the problem.

There's no panacea to fix all the world's problems in one fell sweep either. Or even just to fix the USA's problems.

Try reading less demagogic opinion and more actual analysis.

Comment: Dubai (Score 1) 107

by hao3 (#33518572) Attached to: The Gaping Holes In the UAE's Net Firewall

I lived in Dubai for four years (2001-2005) and just used a HTTP proxy. Everyone knew about them. I've gone back since then and Etisalat (the telecoms monopoly, they now have 'competitors' but they're all state owned too through a bunch of holding companies, so it amounts to the same thing) seems to have blocked them but when I was there last summer I managed to use Tor to get around it.

Comment: Re:Nice trolling there, kdawson (Score 1) 150

by hao3 (#32898698) Attached to: Italian Draft Wiretapping Law Under Fire

the issue with wiretapping here it's that in the current law (the one being proposed) it's misguided - it targets journalists while the fault lies in judges and their collaborators, who like to "spread" news even before investigations are complete. This is mostly a problem for people outside investigations, that are by chance talking with the plaintiffs. Sometimes personal details (completely irrelevant to the matter) make it to the newspapers, tarnishing reputations.

ah, 'tarnishing reputations' and 'corrupt' judges, the excuse for tyrants everywhere to censor and suppress freedom. I'd trust a judge over a politician almost all of the time.

Comment: Re:Silvio Berlusconi (Score 1) 150

by hao3 (#32897744) Attached to: Italian Draft Wiretapping Law Under Fire

The "Legal scandals" ended up with exonerations (more than once), there is not a single case that has been proven in tribunal. Show me a single case that has merit.

Actually, no. He was convicted for corrupting the judges in the Mondadori case, but saved by the Italian equivalent of the "Statute of Limitations", i.e. after stalling the trial as long as he could, eventually we reached the stage where facts were too old to be considered. Same for illegal party funding in the first All-Iberian case, and illegal funds used to buy a footballer.
He was also convicted of lying to judges and using illegal funds to buy land, but was saved by generalized amnesty.
A couple of other trials were nullified by laws he passed (All-Iberian 2, SME-Ariosto 2). He's still awaiting judgement on a trial where his then-lawyer was convicted of corruption, again coming out of All-Iberian.

It's all on Wikipedia, among other places, but you're probably not interested in facts. Keep voting whatever you want, I've left the country for good, only come back every few years to be a tourist -- lovely food, shame for people constantly complaining about the shit economy and crap society.

Quite right, he gets away with it by passing laws and amnesties, and statutes of limitations. Hardly an 'exoneration', he just makes himself look more and more guilty with his blatant lies and nepotism.

Comment: Re:Silvio Berlusconi (Score 2, Informative) 150

by hao3 (#32897696) Attached to: Italian Draft Wiretapping Law Under Fire

Opposing the government is bad?

Just a few of the countless allegations Berlusconi has faced would be enough to cause someone to resign in most other developed countries, never mind lengthy court cases or 'exonerations'. Sadly, Italy is on the lower end of the scale for the first world when it comes to corruption and transparency.

http://www.transparency.org/content/download/47601/761851/CPI+2009+Regional+Highlights+EU+and+Western+Europe_en.pdf

Italy gets 4.3, only slightly less corrupt than Bulgaria, Greece and Romania. Greece is the only other Western European Country that's worse, and look where they are now. Slovenia, Hungary, Poland, Czech Republic and Slovakia are all less corrupt than Italy, and they're much less developed. Globally, Namibia, South Africa and Oman are some of the countries with a better ranking than Italy, which ranks 63rd, just above Saudi Arabia and Tunisia. ( http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/cpi/2009/cpi_2009_table ).

Italy comes joint 17th with Brazil on the Bribe Payers Index, again below South Africa and just above India, Mexico, China and Russia. ( http://www.transparency.org/news_room/latest_news/press_releases/2008/bpi_2008_en )

http://www.transparency.org/content/download/43788/701097

69% of respondents think the current government's actions to fight corruption are ineffective. Political parties get 4.1 out of 5 as an index of corruption.

I suppose that's all the opposition left-wing's fault?

Comment: Re:Silvio Berlusconi (Score 1) 150

by hao3 (#32897470) Attached to: Italian Draft Wiretapping Law Under Fire

we vote for berlusconi because there are no alternatives, the commies had their chance a few years ago and their government blew up after less than 2 years because they couldn't agree on anything even if they were allied

he might not be the best option ever, but it's the best we have right now

I have a hard time believing anyone could be worse than Berlusconi.

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