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Comment: Re:A backwards step (Score 1) 81

by hande1 (#29533909) Attached to: New OLPC Laptop 1.5 Dual-Boots Sugar, Gnome Desktop
It's a massive backwards step in power consumption for one - and a muddled mess of user focus.

I don't understand how moving to an underpowered generic piss-poor central hardware framework does not constitute a step backwards.

Geode was a crime of necessity that fit the schema at the time. We've moved on, and the options WERE out there this time. If Geode was a crime, then C7-M is a travesty.

Comment: A backwards step (Score 5, Insightful) 81

by hande1 (#29531383) Attached to: New OLPC Laptop 1.5 Dual-Boots Sugar, Gnome Desktop
All the innovation is slowly being peeled back. Look at the OLPC now and you see a stripped back, diluted netbook. The VIA C7-M architecture is about 4-5 years old. To say the core of this hardware is pushing the boundaries is laughable. Once upon a time the OLPC team would take a leap and risk their necks on an interesting HW choice - now they're tied to X86 so they can suckle off MS. I sincerely hope that V2 brings the design back to its low power roots by embracing ARM although the way Negroponte is shacking up with the Windows brigade does not look hopeful. Kids don't need 720p playback (The screen for one isn't suitable). Looking at the OLPC now just makes me sad, and a little angry that this revision is going to be lauded so much. My Dell Mini 10 is more innovative...

Comment: Re:There is no silver bullet (Score 1) 438

by hande1 (#29444875) Attached to: (Near) Constant Internet While RV'ing?
Sorry... formatting FAIL.

This is a problem I have been faced with in several projects in and the message is...there is no silver bullet.

You cannot magically construct backhaul where there is zero infrastructure. It's just not possible.

The only thing you can feasibly do is work within the confines of available technologies, and maximise the usability of these. For example, I am using a home-made gateway in my most recent project, using Squid + Cellular dongle (HSPA/EDGE/GPRS). However, in this case the difference is that several users are using the network, thus a caching proxy makes perfect sense because my users are using separate terminals to access the same data.

As someone else has mentioned, you can also pick devices that give you the best chance of getting a signal. in my experience, cable loss on most devices is such that unless you plan on taking directional equipment with you and spending a few mins aiming it, this is pointless. Make sure your adapter supports receive diversity as many of the cheap Huawei models vendors like to give out just don't.

Going back to SW approaches... you can maximise speed by utilising server side compression at your ISP end (mostly enforced on you though to be honest). This way you're pulling down as little as possible - and really that is the key. Alternatively I floated a concept I disgustingly labelled 'cloud caching'. Basically the premise of using a VPS or dedicated server to do this content compression using FOSS, and then using the VPS as a gateway - http://up-stream.co.uk/2009/05/rabbit-web-proxy/

Before I cut away from that point, if you don't fancy rolling your own, and you don't know if your operator has any data compression you can hook onto Opera Turbo, which does the same thing but you're at the mercy of their servers - http://up-stream.co.uk/2009/05/opera-turbo-testing/

I can only speak for cellular, and not for satellite. Other /.'ers will be able to help there, but what little experience I do have leads me to believe your connection will be a bigger running cost than the petrol you put in your RV... easily.

Also, sorry for using links to my own work. By all mean look for other resources RE the stuff I have pointed out. Google is our friend.

Comment: There is no silver bullet (Score 1) 438

by hande1 (#29444783) Attached to: (Near) Constant Internet While RV'ing?
This is a problem I have been faced with in several projects in and the message is...there is no silver bullet. You cannot magically construct backhaul where there is zero infrastructure. It's just not possible. The only thing you can feasibly do is work within the confines of available technologies, and maximise the usability of these. For example, I am using a home-made gateway in my most recent project, using Squid + Cellular dongle (HSPA/EDGE/GPRS). However, in this case the difference is that several users are using the network, thus a caching proxy makes perfect sense because my users are using separate terminals to access the same data. As someone else has mentioned, you can also pick devices that give you the best chance of getting a signal. in my experience, cable loss on most devices is such that unless you plan on taking directional equipment with you and spending a few mins aiming it, this is pointless. Make sure your adapter supports receive diversity as many of the cheap Huawei models vendors like to give out just don't. Going back to SW approaches... you can maximise speed by utilising server side compression at your ISP end (mostly enforced on you though to be honest). This way you're pulling down as little as possible - and really that is the key. Alternatively I floated a concept I disgustingly labelled 'cloud caching'. Basically the premise of using a VPS or dedicated server to do this content compression using FOSS, and then using the VPS as a gateway - http://up-stream.co.uk/2009/05/rabbit-web-proxy/ Before I cut away from that point, if you don't fancy rolling your own, and you don't know if your operator has any data compression you can hook onto Opera Turbo, which does the same thing but you're at the mercy of their servers - http://up-stream.co.uk/2009/05/opera-turbo-testing/ I can only speak for cellular, and not for satellite. Other /.'ers will be able to help there, but what little experience I do have leads me to believe your connection will be a bigger running cost than the petrol you put in your RV... easily. Also, sorry for using links to my own work. By all mean look for other resources RE the stuff I have pointed out. Google is our friend.

Comment: Couldn't care less about the monopoly aspect... (Score 1) 74

by hande1 (#29365535) Attached to: In the UK, T-Mobile and Orange To Merge
The EU tend to be vicious these days with mobile operators, so I'm not really worried about the monopoly aspect. What I'm pleased about is what this could potentially do to HSPA coverage on our fair Isle. T-Mobile & Huchinson are already in bed till 2031 in a UMTS Network sharing agreement. Add Orange into the mix and Voda (with their handful of 14.4Mbps coverage spots) don't really look too hot...
Software

+ - Open Source Cyber Cafe Management

Submitted by hande1
hande1 (1619561) writes "A buddy just called me to see if I'd be interested in setting up a small cyber cafe for some family friends. Immediately thoughts of FOSS ran through my head and as a network engineer I was lost in a daze of PFSense and similar projects for that side of things. I presumed that there would also be an absolute wealth of Open Source cyber cafe management and monitoring solutions out there but that does not seem to be the case. Even popular projects like Cybera appear to have stalled, and I'm left wondering how the hell we minimise costs in that area by finding some kind of FOSS solution. Using Vista is a necessary evil unfortunately and so any management platform must be compatible with that. Have any slashdotters had any experience in this area? Where would you recommend I go from here?"

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