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Comment: Re:Still pretty affordable (Score 1) 386

by hackertourist (#47934923) Attached to: Is the Tesla Model 3 Actually Going To Cost $50,000?

Why go to the lengths of having a second official meter and a second address? That strikes me as more expensive than it needs to be, I'd have wired an unofficial meter in the circuit from the main breaker panel to the garage, that way you'd be able to monitor usage without all the overhead.

Comment: Re:Well, we really should be at that stage by now. (Score 1) 486

by hackertourist (#47878689) Attached to: To Really Cut Emissions, We Need Electric Buses, Not Just Electric Cars

There were a lot of factors that made NS Savannah economically unviable.
- it was built for individual cargo crates, just when crates were being replaced by ISO containers.
- it was small and had a streamlined hull, which meant very limited cargo capacity.
- it had a lot of space dedicated to passengers, just when passenger ships were being replaced by the jet airliner
- it was built at a time when diesel was very cheap
- the reactor personnel demanded similar wages to power station personnel, which worked out to a higher salary than the ship's officers. The labor dispute kept it out of service for a year.

Just a few years after the ship was decommissioned, increasing fuel prices meant conventional ships became as expensive to operate as Savannah.

Comment: Safe choice? The CST-100 has never flown (Score 4, Interesting) 123

by hackertourist (#47874269) Attached to: SpaceX and Boeing Battle For US Manned Spaceflight Contracts

It's peculiar that TFA labels the Boeing design the 'safe choice' when it hasn't flown yet, despite $0.5B of investment from NASA. And the Atlas V launch vehicle may have flown a lot of missions, but it isn't man-rated yet.
The SpaceX Dragon has flown several times, and has spent months in orbit docked to the ISS. Now I realize the manned Dragon has many new systems, but it seems to me SpaceX is a lot closer to a man-rated capsule than Boeing.

+ - More than twice as much mercury in environment as thought->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "The most comprehensive estimate of mercury released into the environment is putting a new spotlight on the potent neurotoxin. By accounting for mercury in consumer products, such as thermostats, and released by industrial processes, the calculations more than double previous tallies of the amount of mercury that has entered the environment since 1850. The analysis also reveals a previously unknown spike in mercury emissions during the 1970s, caused largely by the use of mercury in latex paint."
Link to Original Source

Comment: What really happened with Exocet (Score 3, Interesting) 448

The French gave the British potentially valuable information on the Exocet's capabilities and limitations, and details on how it operated (e.g. its radar frequency, which you need to know if you want to use jamming).
Despite this, 4 of the 5 Exocets launched were hits, and damaged or sank British ships.

+ - The Sims 4 pixellates pirate copies->

Submitted by UgLyPuNk
UgLyPuNk (1166251) writes "The Sims franchise has always been a favourite among software pirates, so it's no surprise that Maxis has tucked a little something special into The Sims 4. Rather than simply locking pirates out of the game, or implementing digital rights management that causes more problems than it fixes, the studio's opted for a more creative approach.

Read more from Player Attack: http://www.playerattack.com.au..."

Link to Original Source

+ - How IKEA turn to CG for its catalog - only 25% of pics are real-> 1

Submitted by advid.net
advid.net (595837) writes "Have you ever wondered why the furniture look so beautiful in the catalog, but not that much once in your home?

In the IKEA catalog 75% of the pictures are computer generated, only 25% are shots of real scenes with real products.

CG Society interviewed Martin Enthed and his team about how they managed to switch from traditional shooting to CG:

[...] the real turning point for us was when, in 2009, they called us and said, “You have to stop using CG. I’ve got 200 product images and they’re just terrible. You guys need to practice more.” So we looked at all the images they said weren’t good enough and the two or three they said were great, and the ones they didn’t like were photography and the good ones were all CG!

The article stress many advantages CG have over traditional shooting, and points out that even the kitchen, the most expensive shooting, has its layout localized to the targeted country (big white sink or small stainless sink, more drawers, ...)."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:F1 is no longer screaming at 15k (Score 2) 116

by hackertourist (#47823595) Attached to: The Quiet Revolution of Formula E Electric Car Racing

For sound, I've found the best venue is tractor pulling. All kinds of motive power in a single meet, from RR Griffons to high-strung V8 to helicopter turbines to methanol two-stage turbo engines. Because speeds are relatively low you can get really close to the track, it also means more immersion in the sound compared to having cars whizz by at 200+ km/h.

Comment: Re:It's worse than you think (Score 4, Insightful) 108

by hackertourist (#47741977) Attached to: Air Force Requests Info For Replacement Atlas 5 Engine

Bullshit.

The Atlas V was designed at a time when the Soviet Union was crumbling. Using Russian engines was an American ploy to ensure world stability by keeping Russian rocket designers gainfully employed instead of leaving them fend for themselves, building God knows what for the highest bidder.

Did that work? Well, I haven't seen much progess in rocket technology by people crazy enough to start wars.

Has this tactic outlived its usefulness? Yes, in view of recent developments, it's time for a new arrangement. Oh, look, that's just what they're doing.

Comment: Re:Only 6 pairs? (Score 3, Informative) 135

They use optical amplifiers. The signal stays in optical form, and is guided through a special section of fiber. A laser pumps energy into that fiber section, some of that energy ends up amplifying the signal. So it still needs power to drive the laser.

I never cheated an honest man, only rascals. They wanted something for nothing. I gave them nothing for something. -- Joseph "Yellow Kid" Weil

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