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Comment: Re:LOL ... w00t? (Score 1) 291

by gzuckier (#48663869) Attached to: Amazon "Suppresses" Book With Too Many Hyphens

Propose such a "simple" perl script.

Here are some cases it should know how to deal with:

Between numbers (note that slashdot eats some of these characters; the numbers below all have different dashes or related symbols between "555" and "1000"): "Pages 555–1000 discuss this matter" (this should be an internumeral dash, which is typically an en dash, U+2013). "Her phone number is 5551000" (this should be a figure dash, U+2012). "There were actually a lot more of them than the estimated 555—1000, to be precise" (this should be an em dash, U+2014). "The teacher asked me to solve 5551000. I told him negative 455 was the answer." (this should be a minus sign, U+2212)

Between letters/words you have a similar problem: even if you know it shouldn't be a minus sign (which symbolic algebra makes tough to know for sure, but suppose you could surmount that), you generally have no idea what kind of dash or hyphen it should be turned into.

I say they're all - and I say to hell with them all.

Comment: Re:Precious Snowflake (Score 1) 323

by gzuckier (#48663751) Attached to: Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline
The main lesson spanking and other punishments done on an interpersonal basis teaches, is that "it's you vs me, kid, and I have the advantage of size and strength". The kid learns to behave, when in your sight and within your reach. If you want the kid to learn the consequences of behavior, you need to convince him/her that those consequences occur even when you aren't around. The only time that kind of direct interpersonal punishment is appropriate is when the behavior is actually interpersonally bad, like when the kid tries to hit you. You don't smack the kid back, necessarily, you can just pick him/her up and stick him wherever for a time out. Most healthy kids will attempt to assume dominance now and then; that's not the same thing as trying to do something despite knowing you don't want them to, and needs to be addressed as such. If the rest of your child rearing is going well, you're generally convincing the kid that you are wise and your advice is generally the best option, and to obey you because that's what works best in the world; this in your face stuff is where the "i'm your parent and that's that" is appropriate.

Comment: Re:Precious Snowflake (Score 1) 323

by gzuckier (#48663663) Attached to: Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline
While she was in the kitchen? She couldn't keep the kid from climbing the gate, heading to the stove and planting his hands on the open oven door? That situation needs more to fix it than spanking the kid. And if spanking the kid would teach him to not plant his hands on the open oven door, then the minute she wasn't in the kitchen, what do you think the kid would do? Spanking is useful sometimes, not as a punishment, but to break a kid's focus from some undesirable behavior; the childhood equivalent of that slapping the hysterical person thing. "Thanks, I needed that!". It's not spanking in the sense of painful punishment, it's as you say, a swat on the rear, not even painful but enough to get their attention. Not clear how it would have worked in this situation you describe. But if you were holding the kid, and he was actively struggling trying to get away and completely focused on planting his hands onto the oven door, then that's when a swat on the rear to break his focus would be appropriate, so you could reach his brain again.

Comment: Re:Precious Snowflake (Score 1) 323

by gzuckier (#48663567) Attached to: Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

It probably has more to do with torturing people, blowing up innocent women and children via drones, 100+ years of interference in other governments (including supporting drug smugglers, funding violent overthrow of democratically elected leaders, funding oppressive regimes, funding death squads), domestic police murdering people, and generally being a dick that sees no wrong with itself.

How many people do you know that actually do that? Small number right? How many people do you know that just go along with that and don't question anything? Large number right? That last group is the "everyone's a winner" crowd.

And all the people who neither do that, nor just go along with it, but in fact vociferously support it in comments columns and editorials and TV "news", vote for politicians who approve it, fight any attempt to prosecute it; that apparent 50% of the population are the "everyone's a winner" crowd? Not the "small government, lower taxes, Obama's a socialist" crowd?

Comment: Re:Precious Snowflake (Score 1) 323

by gzuckier (#48663541) Attached to: Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

I don't think the reason large portions of the world don't "like us" is because "everyone's a winner". It probably has more to do with torturing people, blowing up innocent women and children via drones, 100+ years of interference in other governments (including supporting drug smugglers, funding violent overthrow of democratically elected leaders, funding oppressive regimes, funding death squads), domestic police murdering people, and generally being a dick that sees no wrong with itself.

Now, stop whining or I'll give you something to cry about!

Why do you hate America? Terrorist!

Comment: Re:Precious Snowflake (Score 1) 323

by gzuckier (#48663525) Attached to: Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

Don't know why so many people on slashdot are misunderstanding the gist of this article as sheltering or babying kids and instead are in favor of making kids suffer for the sake of suffering. Perhaps these are people who suffered so much as kids themselves and are defending this as a way to justify their own upbringing?

Because today's rightwing is all about bullying and hurting people. The government can't be trusted to regulate the environment, but they're to be trusted with the ability to lock you up and/or kill you. Sending foreign aid is a waste of money, conducting foreign wars is necessary. Sometimes prisoners need torturing, if they're innocent, bad luck. And, clearly, the authors of this piece are "liberals" and thus their point of view is just WRONG.

Comment: Re:Precious Snowflake (Score 1) 323

by gzuckier (#48663449) Attached to: Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

Exactly. Far too many children are coddled and protected far too much growing up. Kids need to learn that not every day is happy sunshine fun land while they're kids. Yeah, it's no fun being punished/disciplined for screwing up, or failing at something, but when you're a kid the stakes are low. I see far too many young people where I work (college) that are on their own for the first time and have never worked at anything in their whole life, never had someone not holding their hand and wiping their nose. What happens? They fall flat on their face and then howl that it's not fair. Better to learn early how to struggle and persevere and succeed than to coast into failure later.

Kids today! When I was a kid, your parents would shoot at you just for fun! And we loved it!

Comment: Re:I don't even... (Score 1) 323

by gzuckier (#48663419) Attached to: Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

I think what they really want are children who are so unruly that their parents can't control them, and they can't function in society. They make for perfect lemmings fully dependent on the government.

If you honestly think it's a government conspiracy then you are at least a little bit "broken, psychotic, or socially maladjusted".

It's an interesting theory. Since the folks running this thing are obviously "liberal", i.e. don't want to hurt people, even their own children, then they must be secretly plotting for socialist takeover; therefore, working backwards from this conclusion, the mechanism must be that rebellious people are more easily controlled by the government. On the other hand, if they were teaching the kids not to play with guns, then the mechanism would be that compliant people are more easily controlled by the government. Either way, Benghazi! That darn Obama, am I right?

Comment: Re:I don't even... (Score 1) 323

by gzuckier (#48663363) Attached to: Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline
Kids, and mammals in general, are capable of learning basic laws of nature on their own; such as the law of gravity, and what it feels like when you try to violate it. The trick in parenting is to convince the kid (or other mammal) that what you want to teach it is a law of nature, and not a law of you. Because kids (and mammals in general) will only obey your laws under threat of duress, and that engenders rebellion and resentment to a large or small degree, and not belief in the rule you are trying to teach them. This requires you to be smarter than the kid (or other mammal), which is surprisingly rare even in the case of the other mammals. The people who spend half an hour chasing their kid or dog around while screaming "come here! come here right now!" and finally when they catch him/her/it, punish it, for instance. (See also the current national inability to understand that if police have a slight tendency to kill certain segments of the population when they apprehend them, members of that segment will attempt to avoid apprehension.) Sometimes you have to pick your battles, obviously. It's better to ignore the kid running wildly than to try to capture him/her/it and demonstrate your inability to do so. So the being smarter than the kid requires you to have enough forethought to not get into that situation in the first place. You teach things gradually, at a pace where the kid will learn successfully and not get frustrated and doubt that it's possible to learn stuff, and don't give the kid anything they can't handle. That's how you create a kid with a good attitude and confidence and the ability to regulate behavior without building up resentment. However, the other side of being smarter than the kid is knowing what is actually good for the kid; obviously raising a little psychopath is not good (although that may be more genetic than anything you do), but on the other hand it's not entirely clear that raising a kid who is so well behaved that you never have any difficulties as a parent results in a kid who is optimally equipped to compete in society.

Comment: Re:I don't even... (Score 1) 323

by gzuckier (#48663205) Attached to: Putting Time Out In Time Out: The Science of Discipline

I felt the exact same way. "Oh, okay, so no spanking, no time outs. What should I do?" And finally at the end of the article they say something about teachable moments.

Ummmm...so what do I do when my 2 year old hits the cat? Most of the time he's loving and playful with the cat. But then sometimes for no reason he throws a toy truck at the poor cat. So I yell at him "NO!" and send him for a time out. Then I explain what he did was wrong, and make him apologize to the cat, and then explain that we only love and pet our kitty.

What the fuck is wrong with that? What else am I supposed to do? Let him go right on doing it and wait for some teachable moment about not hitting the cat? TFA says "what you're doing is wrong" with little explanation why and then fails to tell you what to do instead except some hippy crap about talking to your kids.

What Would Garfield Do?

Comment: Re:And who will collect the trash? (Score 1) 439

by gzuckier (#48661695) Attached to: How Venture Capitalist Peter Thiel Plans To Live 120 Years

So, Metro City, the movie version.

or "L. Bob Rife's Raft, a flotilla of ships circulating the in the pacific, bringing immigrants in search of a better life from the Third World to the California coast. These immigrants are known as Refus. The Raft is a lawless, sprawling, entangled mess of boats of all sizes, all connected eventually to the aircraft carrier piloted by L. Bob. Rife himself, which has only a tangential influence on the actual navigation of the Raft." https://mslinder.wikispaces.co... Crash by Neal Stephenson-Plot Summary-The Raft

After any salary raise, you will have less money at the end of the month than you did before.

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